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Jerry Lewis

Adventures of Dean Martin & Jerry Lewis No. 1-40 (National Periodicals Jul-Aug 1952 - Oct 1957) Adventures of Jerry Lewis No. 41-124 (National Periodicals Nov 1957 - May-Jun 1971)Wacky madcap adventures of America's loveable prince of comedy.Some notable issues in the series:3 - I Love Lucy text featurette74 - Photo -c83 - 1st monsters c/s84 - Jerry as a Superhero88 - 1st Witch, Miss Kraft89 - Bob Hope app.92 - Superman cameo93 - Beatles parody97 - Batman & Robin c/s104 - Neal Adams c/s102 - Beatles app., Neal Adams c/a105 - Superman x-over112 - Flash x-over117 - W. Woman x-over

deathlok

deathlok

09/02/2007

Kang the Conquerer

Kang the Conqueror (born Nathaniel Richards and known variously as Iron Lad, Pharaoh Rama-Tut, and the Scarlet Centurion) is a supervillain in Marvel Comics. He is a time traveller from the 30th Century who has frequently travelled to the present day and fought the Avengers. He first appeared in Avengers #8 and was created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. Origin Nathaniel Richards - the man who would become Kang - was born in an alternate timeline. The Earth there had been transformed into a paradise thanks to Mister Fantastic's father, the Nathaniel Richards after whom he was named. However, this younger Nathaniel, a scholar, was restless in this peaceful world, and studied the history of war in his longing for a more savage and driven age. His long-term hospitalization after being severely injured by bullies (and the near-financial ruin of his family as a result) quite probably caused or increased this drive. He discovered time travel technology that one of his ancestors (who may have been Nathaniel Richards[1] or Doctor Doom) had invented. Kang travelled back in time to ancient Egypt and became the Pharaoh Rama-Tut. He had traveled to the past hoping to find En Sabah Nur, the mutant that would be known as Apocalypse, and control him, yet his actions would only succeed in making En Sabah Nur become Apocalypse. Kang ruled until he was driven off by the time-displaced heroes of the 20th century, including the Fantastic Four and the West Coast Avengers. Following that conflict, he left the past and travelled to a post-apocalyptic 40th century and reinvented himself briefly as the Scarlet Centurion before settling on the identity of Kang the Conqueror. From there he created his interstellar, interdimensional and inter-temporal empire that would not only include Earth, but future versions of the Brotherhood of the Badoon, the Shi'ar Empire, and the dimension of Kosmos. On his first foray into the twentieth century, he was thwarted by the Avengers, and they have remained his enemies ever since, having fought him on dozens of occasions. However, due to the diverging of timelines that was caused by his time travelling technology, multiple and sometimes divergent versions of himself were created. Most of them were eventually eliminated by the Council of Kangs, which were set up by one of the multiple Kangs to rid himself of his counterparts.

deathlok

deathlok

03/13/2007

Captain America #25

Iconic superhero Captain America shot dead -- maybe By Belinda Goldsmith Wed Mar 7, 3:56 PM ET NEW YORK (Reuters) - He fought the Nazis. He is revered by other crime-fighters worldwide. But the beloved, shield-carrying superhero, Captain America, has finally met his end -- or has he? ADVERTISEMENT   The winged-hooded Marvel Entertainment Inc. hero created in 1941 is shot dead in New York by a sniper in the latest Captain America issue that hit newsstands on Wednesday, in a sensational comic-book plot twist that had been kept a closely guarded secret. Blood seeps from his red-white-and-blue costume as life ebbs from Steve Rogers, the scrawny student who was transformed into the physically perfect superhero when he volunteered to be injected with "Super Soldier" serum during World War II. But executives at Marvel acknowledged death is not always final in the superhero universe -- and they hope the same is true for flagging comics sales of Captain America, who has lost ground to more contemporary superheroes like Spider-Man. "This is the end of Steve Rogers, the meat and potatoes guy from 1941," Dan Buckley, president and publisher of publishing, Marvel Entertainment, told Reuters. "But Captain America is a costume, and there are other people who could take it over. He is iconic, and we're continuing the comic books," he added. But he declined to speculate who could step into the hero's 66-year-old boots. He said the continuing comic series would initially be focused on the reaction of other characters to Captain America's death. This was similar to the death of Superman in 1993, when the leading superhero of Marvel rival D.C. Comics was killed off after about 55 years -- only to be brought back months later. Captain America has appeared in about 210 million comics in 75 countries, but currently his title sells up to 80,000 copies a month in the United States, down from about 150,000 in their heyday. Unlike other comic heroes such as Spider-Man, Superman, Batman and the Fantastic Four, the Captain has yet to win Hollywood fame, though Buckley said there are plans for a Captain America movie. "He is still popular, but he has not been getting the same attention as Spider-Man and others," said Buckley. "We hope this will make him more popular in the short-term at least." Captain America's assassination secret comes in the aftermath of a seven-issue mini-series, Marvel's civil war, which divided superheroes as the government ordered them to reveal their true identities and register with authorities. This caused a major rift and resulted in two super-powered factions, one led by Captain America, who went underground and formed a resistance movement, the other by Iron Man. In the end, Captain America surrendered to Iron Man's pro-registration forces -- but is shot dead on the steps of New York's Federal Courthouse on his way to face charges. Gerry Gladston, co-owner of Midtown Comics in Manhattan, said Captain America's assassination -- and the fact it had remained such a secret, even to some Marvel staff -- was "pretty Earth-shattering" and had sent sales soaring already. "Captain America is still one of the most relevant comic book characters and the one with the most iconic status in the Marvel Universe who is revered by the others," said Gladston. "I hope they bring him back. I miss him already." Reuters/Nielsen

deathlok

deathlok

03/13/2007

 

Flash 229 CGC 9.6

New addition to Set Just received this beautiful looking book in the mail. From Ebay seller Magentalin. I was a little nervous about bidding because the seller was located in the UK and had only 16 feedbacks. I took the chance and was rewarded with a beaut of a book.   OW-W pages.

deathlok

deathlok

06/08/2005

 

New Registry Entries

Oodles O Noodles With the addition of several new Registry titles, there apepars to be a huge inlfux of collectors entering their sets. One of the more frequent entries seems to be X-men sets. Several high profile collectors, such as Ghost Town and Cpt. Tripps have already amassed a very impressive set to beat.   Kudos to the Registry staff for answering the demand for more sets.

deathlok

deathlok

05/18/2005

 

Comic Websites

A list of comic websites to buy from, that I would recommend. www.pedigreecomics.com www.milehighcomics.com www.metropoliscomics.com www.comiclink.com www.highgradecomics.com www.detective27.com www.colmorecomics.com  

deathlok

deathlok

05/15/2005

 

Comic Book Statues

Starting off slowly. I have never been a big fan of buying comic book characters stateus or busts. I guess I just didn't think the idea of it just sitting on a shelf didn't appeal to me.   For some unknown reason I have become more interested in statues and busts. I suppose the detail of the current crop of figures has vastly been improved over earlier figures.   So far I have 4 in my collection:   1. Deadpool bust (Bowen) 2. Taskmaster bust (Bowen) 3. Nova bust (Bowen) 4. Deathlok (Bowen)  

deathlok

deathlok

05/15/2005