OtherEric

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  1. I think I saw a few of those, but the EC I've really had my eye on a few weeks was a BIN, so I wasn't planning on bidding. The BIN book should be here later this week, though...
  2. if you're going to go big, go BIG: (Just realized that the 2nd one in the spine picture isn't the same as the 2nd issue with the front. The basic "no, these are thick pulps" joke still fits:)
  3. I have very few detective pulps in my collection. Here's a couple, though.
  4. Complete run. Best known for two things: 1) it's the first publication of Arthur C. Clarke's "Sentinel of Eternity", better know simply as "The Sentinel", which formed the starting point for 2001: A Space Odyssey. 2) The editor couldn't count; there are 13 stories in the issue, not 10!
  5. The only non-reprint Kull I have is a poem; published several years after Howard's death. Not what I would normally call a good starting point, but since I scanned the page a while back I can post the whole thing here. It stands on its own well enough:
  6. To answer the original question: I think pulps have exploded the last few years. There was a lull a few years ago, when for whatever reason there was very little interest in pulps from anybody, and some of us were lucky enough to put together the start of very nice collections. But they're definitely jumping in interest, with a lot of comic folks looking at them as an alternative to sky-high comic prices. What we don't know at this point is how big they will become... we could be at the new peak, or we could be nowhere near. I actually suspect this very forum will, if not cause in increase in interest, will speed up the process of people getting interested. There are a lot of collectors here. Pulps may already be the next big thing. But it will probably be a few years before we can look back and say yes, at this point they were.
  7. A trio of digest issues, including what I believe is the first digest issue...
  8. I think this is the only pulp I have with a sports cover...
  9. I can respect your opinion, even if I disagree with large parts of it. Finlay did a LOT more than 1% of the covers, I do like Brundage but will freely grant that her work is in a fairly narrow register and I certainly disagree with those who try to suggest she's the greatest Pulp cover artist. I like a lot of the Bok covers, personally. Freas did quite a few covers late in the run that I like as well. Budget might have gotten in the way of hiring others, I understand that Weird Tales was always more of a niche magazine than a lot of others. It's too bad Gahan Wilson only showed up in time to have interior art in a couple very late issues... I would have loved to see a cover by him on the classic run.
  10. I suspect most of the hero pulps can fit in one generic topic... But Kent Allard and Doc Savage both deserve their own. Since Kent Allard already has his own thread, I figured I would provide one for Doctor Clark Savage, Jr. Most of my issues are near the end of the run, for better or worse:
  11. Well, the last one is actually a bedsheet... and one I badly need. I do not have the Deadline issue. It's high on my want list, but just in general I want to put together a complete run of the Campbell edited Astounding/ Analog run. With that said, it does stand out on my want list because of its historical significance. You could do far worse with Lovecraft than to start with The Shadow Out of Time, I think. I do need to insert my standard disclaimer that, while he's one of my favorite writers, I do fully recognize he's a problematic favorite. The Shadow Out of Time is my favorite of his stories, I remain very happy that that was the first Lovecraft story I got the original publication of. I'm sure others would have good suggestions on where to start with Lovecraft. The one I would warn you away from is Herbert West: Reanimator, which some people unfamiliar with his work track down because they like the movies. It's actually one of his worst written stories by general consensus.
  12. To give some context to this one, in case anybody doesn't already know, here's the front cover.