Pat Thomas

Member
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    45
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About Pat Thomas

  • Boards Title
    Hobbyist
  • Birthday 11/14/1966

Personal Information

  • Comic Collecting Interests
    Golden Age
    Silver Age
    Bronze Age
    Copper Age
    Modern Age
  • Occupation
    Retired
  • Hobbies
    Home improvement, car restoration
  • Location
    Alabama, USA

Recent Profile Visitors

319 profile views
  1. USPS lost a longbox I sent to mycomicshop at the end of May. My local branch told me to quit bringing my heavy prepaid boxes into the lobby, and instead drop them in the warehouse. That particular day, I had 2 longboxes and another regular sized box, and the warehouse guy and I loaded all 3 onto a skid. I didn't find out anything was wrong until I tracked them all 2 weeks later. Two were already delivered, and the other one hadn't been scanned into the system yet. It has not turned up yet, and I still don't have confidence that anybody physically looked for my big, heavy, white box. It cost me about $400 in store credit with mycomicshop.com, but I can't prove anything. I'm pretty sure they couldn't care less.
  2. Try pushing the air out with a ruler as you fold the flap over. That will help some. If you don't pull the flap too tight, the rest of the air should come out when you file away in your box.
  3. FYI, mycomicshop.com buys entire collections, too. They have several different options depending on what the collection consists of and how much time you want to spend on it. You can call and talk directly to the owner, Buddy Saunders, and he will tell you whether they are interested in buying the entire collection or not. If they aren't, he will probably give you advice. You can read all the testimonials from sellers on their website. There are thousands of them.
  4. I say buy what you want. It's human nature for others to be envious when someone possesses an item they can't afford, especially if it's more than one. Envy and jealousy are prevalent in society today because everybody needs to be a victim. Ignore them and buy as many copies of any comic you want. It's your collection to shape how you want it.
  5. 2012 I think. The movie hadn't come out yet, though.
  6. I love reading these big success stories. There are a few of you who hit deals that are truly once in a lifetime. I regularly see threads on other boards that prove the books are still out there, so I try to investigate any possible leads to GA and SA comics, and I'm willing to occasionally gamble on a grab bag. The best I've personally done was a grab bag with Avengers 1 as the prize book. The difference in this grab bags and others I've seen is that all the non-winning books were Silver Age Marvel, mostly superhero comics. Some of the titles were JIM/Thor, Tales Of Suspense, Tales To Astonish, Iron Man, ASM, etc. The deal was $15 for 1 random book out of the ones he had pictured, and I bought 20 of them. Most of the books were worth at least $15 anyway, and I didn't own any of them, so I figured I would end up with worthwhile comics anyway. Well, my package came in and I started opening each pack with high anticipation. After 19 packages, I lowered my expectations and prepared to just accept whatever the last book was, and it was the Avengers 1. It was a raw copy, complete with all pages and cover attached. It was definitely rough; maybe 2.0 or 2.5, but I spent $300 to get it along with 19 other Sliver Age Marvels, some of which were valuable. Doesn't hold a candle to some others here, but I'll keep searching until I just can't do it anymore. There are still goldmines hidden out there.
  7. There isn't a good excuse for the lack of communication you've experienced. And there is only so far the pandemic can be blamed. Throughout this nationwide shutdown, I've continued buying from estate auctions and off ebay, and I started buying from several dealers I frequent regularly once they said they were available again. At times, the shipping times were a few days off, but not enough that I considered it unreasonable. The stuff I've bought has come from all areas of the country, too. I don't blame you for losing patience since you can't even get a response. Maybe the time for politeness and understanding has passed for you.
  8. That's way worse than cheating on you. Takes a cold heart.
  9. Look, I like Superman just fine, and I collect Action Comics, Adventure Comics, Superman, and World's Finest, and I plan on eventually owning 90% of each series. But I have a very difficult time actually reading DC Silver Age Superman Comics. I love buying them and flipping through my collection, but most of the stories are downright horrible. The "mysteries" didn't make sense half the time, and the way Superman interacted with his "friends" was sometimes psychotic. But what really gets under my skin is that the many times Superman is transformed into "Superbaby", his speech pattern doesn't become childish; Instead, he sounds like a stupid version of the Savage Hulk (Me do this, Me do that, etc.). You're trying to tell us Stan Lee couldn't write at that level? I was 9 when I read my first comics (in 1975), and I loved Spider-Man and the Avengers. I would sit on the floor at the comic spinner in the drug store at the mall while Mom shopped for clothes and other boring stuff, and occasionally a DC cover would catch my eye. Even at that age, the stories didn't seem to me that they had any depth to them. Every story seemed thrown together just enough to fill the pages it needed, all the heroes talked weird, and continuity didn't matter from one story to the next. I was used to good guys who got into arguments and remembered that they were mad at each other, and they talked more like real people. Stan wrote continued stories and tried to make sure all the Marvel books took place in the same world and affected each other. Most Superman comics had 2 or 3 unrelated stories per issue. I don't see how you could consider the DC stuff from that era superior to Marvel in any way. There's a reason why Marvel was able to take so many readers from DC, until New Teen Titans came out. That was the first DC series I thought read like a Marvel.
  10. OP, in the future, if you want cheap copies of the Claremont X-Men, there was a series called X-Men Classic in the 1980's that reprinted them. None of them should cost any more than $5, and they are very common.
  11. OP, I bought the last 10,000 or so comics from my lcs when they shut down last year, and I've been able to move a ton of it by selling to mycomicshop.com I'm just a collector and don't have any experience selling comics, but this has been one of the easiest ways to make extra money for the last 8 months. Getting the books in order and entered into the database was time-consuming, but now I only have to let the orders build up, then pull and ship them. I opt for store credit, because it pays a little more, and I've been able to add almost $12,000 worth of comics to my personal collection. But there is a cash option. If you've never used their system, it might be worth it to put a portion of your dead stock into the database and monitor it for a couple of weeks. You might be surprised.
  12. Ross Andru drew the Spider-Man I consider "mine" from the 1970's. As good as Romita Sr. IMO.
  13. Dealing with customers is a pain in the . It's best to assume that, for the most part, people are trying to spend as little money as possible on expensive comics. Everybody looks for a bargain, but only some of them actually ask for one, figuring they don't have anything to lose by asking. It's just a trait of someone a little more extroverted than the typical person in the comic business, and I can see where you could mistake that as being headstrong or pushy, but they don't usually have any idea they've made you uncomfortable. Sounds like there was nothing wrong with this guy after all, but there are truly awful people out there. Don't put a minor irritant on ignore since he's proven that he will buy from you. Be nice and maybe occasionally give him a little discount, and he will have only warm fuzzy feelings about buying from you. Block the ones who cause your heart race, but learn to deal with customers who might get on your nerves by being themselves. The way you respond to the first inquiry is going to decide your relationship with these people, so just bite your tongue and make them happy if you can. I assume you would like to have some success.
  14. We have a media that instills panic simply in the way they report things, and the majority of the population will only hear the basics of a story, jump to conclusions without any rational thinking, spread incomplete information like wildfire, and suddenly everybody's in a panic. It's the same from the local weather guy all the way up to a national anchor, and it is irresponsible and pretty unethical.
  15. I love seeing that there are still run collectors here. We are the lifeblood of the hobby (at least until we stop buying new ones). The first time I started collecting with attention to condition and an end goal was back in the 1970's, when I was in grade school. Spidey was still in the 160's back then, and was a little past 200 when I stopped. I had collected 100-up of ASM and 100-up of Avengers (they were all such beautiful copies, too), and set a goal to eventually go back to #1 on each. When I got a little older, especially after I got my car (a 1978 Z28), I kind of just lost interest in comics. Over time, I sold them off, and I don't even remember where the bulk of them went. After a short foray into X-Men in 1985 as a senior in high school (which I sold for college money), I was out of it altogether. I didn't buy another comic until 2010, and only because I had become bored and was curious whether I could still enjoy reading them. I didn't imagine that I'd be back in full swing within 6 months. At first, I decided to finish my childhood ambition of ASM and Avengers. I also started buying the newest issues of those titles, and gradually added more. It took about 5 years to finish them both. Unfortunately, I had to learn to accept lesser than NM comics for the Silver Age and some Bronze Age books. Some of them were just too expensive and also hard to locate. But I'm happy with the standards I set for most of my collection. As of now I own these titles to the current issue with annuals: Amazing Spider-Man (plus Spectacular, Sensational, Web Of, Spider-Man, Peter Parker Spider-Man, Unlimited, Family, Marvel Team Up, Superior & Superior Foes & Team Up, Avenging Spider-Man, and a bunch of minis, shorter titles, and one-shots) Avengers (plus New, West Coast, Mighty, US, All New All Different, Secret, Dark, Initiative, Avengers AI, Avengers Academy, Avengers Arena, plus more) Incredible Hulk - From 102 (plus Indestructible, Totally Awesome, and Hulk(red) ) Iron Man & Invincible Iron Man ( plus a bunch of minis ans one-shots) Captain America - From 100 " " " " Uncanny X-Men - From 94 (plus Giant Size X-Men 1, X-Men/New X-Men/Legacy, Amazing, Astonishing, Unlimited, Blue, Gold, Red, Extraordinary, entire Age Of Apocalypse, and about a long box full of specials and minis) X-Factor X-Force, Uncanny X-Force, Cable & X-Force Cable Alpha Flight Wolverine (plus Origins, First Class, Savage, Weapon X, The Best There Is, Wolverine & The X-Men, plus minis & one-shots) Defenders Exiles Black Panther Deadpool Captain Marvel (Mar-vell, Genis-vell, Carol Danvers) Ms Marvel (Carol Danver & Kamala Khan) Moon Knight Daredevil (After I pay last $500 on #1 at lcs) I'm still working on: Fantastic Four - Need 1, 3, 52, Annual 6 Journey Into Mystery/Thor - Need 84, 85, 89 Incredible Hulk 1-6 That's just some of my Marvel stuff. Have a bunch of shorter titles completed, along with a bunch of DC titles)