The Voord

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About The Voord

  • Boards Title
    Bid more or post more... tough one...

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  • Occupation
    Early retired
  • Location
    United Kingdom

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  1. Well, if it's a 'first appearance' surely they can't "too often" (as you say) do that type of thing? First appearances and regular appearances, to me, are miles apart. If it's a 'first appearance', it's a one-off.
  2. A good cover design is supposed to be intriguing, encapsulating the story that awaits the reader in an image that compels you to want to buy the book. Something that comic-books were once good at doing but along the way they've lost the gist of. During those infrequent times I actually set foot in a comic-book store, nowadays, I look around at the display of titles. Few, if any, of the modern titles catches my eye with a hint of a clever design. I'm seldom intrigued enough by what I see on the basis of the cover images to want to shell-out any money to buy anything. A strong visual hook is needed and, for the most part, I'm not seeing any.
  3. Another JEFF HAWKE 'Survival' daily added to my CAF Gallery. Some nice cross-hatching work on this one:
  4. Link to my JEFF HAWKE CAF gallery, which features 20 dailies (including some further 'Survival' examples). A few more dailies still to add in due course . . . https://www.comicartfans.com/galleryroom.asp?gsub=181724
  5. . . . and on this one some direct Johnny Craig swipes from a VAULT OF HORROR lead-story . . .
  6. Got in five nice original artwork examples from the UK newspaper strip JEFF HAWKE that featured in the 1960 adventure, 'Survival' (a big favourite with me). Although Sydney Jordan was the strip's creator and main artist, for 'Survival' most of the finished art was supplied by his assistant at the time, Colin Andrew. Colin must have been a big fan of the EC comics as you can detect a heavy influence in his artwork (in some cases, direct swipes). Here, on this particular daily, you can see Andrew channelling Wally Wood . . .
  7. Link to the MOVIE POSTER Original Artwork FB group I started a few years ago (now at over 1,500 members): https://www.facebook.com/groups/131047770909401/?ref=bookmarks Currently having a successful run of 'theme' weeks which has brought out a lot of paintings not previously seen. Next week's theme is 'For Sale or Trade' week, so if anyone here ever fancied the idea of owning a piece of original Movie Poster artwork, this could be the one to watch! The FB group is proving to be a good resource, not only for the great paintings that are being shared, but also to snap-up artworks being offered For Sale. I recently bought from another member the back cover painting for THE VIDEO DEAD (1987) German Blu-ray release by Adrian Keindorf at the low price of Euros 175 (about $193). Not exactly a great movie (I think it went straight to video at time of release) but as a Horror painting I thought it was quite effective.
  8. Very early EC cover art (1946, I think), for PICTURE STORIES FROM AMERICAN HISTORY # 2,from when the company was managed by Max Gaines and was called 'Educational' Comics . I also own all of the 54 interior pages . . . along with another complete Educational Comics book from the 1940s (Picture Stories From World History # 1).
  9. I'll do it for $400 a page!
  10. If it's original published art (which I know wasn't part of the OP's question, but it does happen), I'd say you're altering the artwork (no matter how discreet the placement of the personalisation might be). Con drawings, commissions and all that stuff is fine, if you're into that type of thing.
  11. In my honest opinion, you'd be better off affixing prices to the artworks you're looking to sell. Some of us are put off by the 'please enquire' school of selling.
  12. My views on this one, which I've mentioned numerous times in the past (whenever these same type threads re-appear), is that some artists are better than others at re-creating past glories. A lot of these fail badly when the artist tries to hand-letter the art and the end-results are very often clumsily performed, lettering being a real skill in itself. A re-created cover by the original artist (or inker) is painful for me to look at if the lettering is badly done.
  13. This. Not saying this applies to the OP, but receiving low-ball offers is a complete waste of time responding to . . . not even with a simple "lol". Receiving low-ball offers would also qualify as a pet peeve. A lot of collectors try it on . . . and you know they're trying it on.