10centcomics

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About 10centcomics

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    Learning the Ropes

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  1. This looks like a classic VG to me.
  2. Dull blade or rat chew? I'd put this in the G range.
  3. Tape on the book means no higher than VG!
  4. Agree with others that this is in the FN range. As for rationale, I think the recessed staples + general spine wear keep it squarely out of the VF range. But there aren't enough defects to bump the grade any lower to VG.
  5. Agree with others that this is in the GD range due to the spine splitting and spine wear. There also appears to be some cover fading (the reds appear somewhat orange-ish now). I would advise against getting this pressed. Not only will it not improve the grade, but also you risk damaging and splitting the spine further.
  6. Thanks for doing this experiment, I think it's valuable information for collectors to know about when figuring out the right price to pay for books with slight restoration. That being said (and maybe this is an unpopular opinion), I don't think I can support doing further damage to a book to remove restoration. The CT scraping on the spine doesn't bother me too much (presumably it is just reverting the book back to its pre-CT days). On the other hand, purposely chipping off a section of the book with CT is something I think we should avoid. Maybe attitudes towards restoration will continue to evolve (some things that used to be considered restoration are now filed under conservation). For my personal collecting, I don't mind slight color touch if it is honestly disclosed and priced appropriately. I guess part of the reason for these practices is because we view the purple label with a stigma (PLOD), but I don't think it should lead to damaging a book to eek out a blue label and some potential financial gain.
  7. I think FN is okay if it were just a tape pull but it's actually a hole in the cover? I would think that bumps it down to VG range.
  8. I think 2.0 might be a little too harsh. The cover is attached; there aren't missing pieces from the cover; there doesn't appear to be any spine splits. Based on the spine wear, an accumulation of color breaking creases, and the interior page damage, I'd put this around 3.0
  9. A missing ad page (even if non-story) automatically knocks the grade to 0.5 (incomplete). If you are wondering what the "qualified" grade would be, I think we would need to see more pictures. I'm not quite sure what is going on in the 2nd pic (is that a spine split or a detached cover?)
  10. If you are thinking about buying this book, I would advise against it. I'd pick up a low-grade copy with creases but good color strike over a faded cover. I think moderately faded books ends up in the VG range and severely faded books (like this one) would be in the G range.
  11. I'm leaning towards the FN range for this book. The bottom right corner and edge are pretty rough with the color-breaking creases to be considered VF I think.
  12. +1 to this; this is my experience as well with 6.0 being the max grade for cover detached at 1 staple
  13. I'd say this is a 4.0 at best. The writing to me is excessive (this isn't just a date stamp, initials, or name neatly written in a corner). Paul wrote his name 4 times and there's a circle around Hulk's hand and Silver Surfer's board. So while it might be technically a VG grade, I don't know if your average collector would pay VG prices for it due to the major hit on eye appeal.
  14. Yeah I think the guide isn't very useful for GA books. For common things like Silver Age Marvels, it can be a useful guideline. For GA, I'm sure all of us would love to pay guide prices for Timely Captain Americas...
  15. I think it's because major events, villains, and first appearances in Batman and Superman lore generally happened in their respective anthology titles (Action, Detective) or dedicated books (Superman, Batman). WF feels like supplemental material by comparison. That being said, I really like the WWII-era WF covers.