Working with Creators and Signings
1 1

92 posts in this topic

NYCC '10: SATURDAY.

 

An artist I approached about 1:30PM, who was sitting in artist alley skectching, refused to sign 1 book because he was "on a schedule". He was not going to sign any items till sometime in the evening, even though he was sitting in artist alley. Lame. :eyeroll:

 

If you can't sign a book, why sit in artist alley?? ???

Link to post
Share on other sites

Some artists choose not to open the floodgates one way or another (sketches/sigs) or when sketching, don't like to be disturbed.

 

People like Dave Finch understand their lines are long and I've seen Dave stop working on a sketch several times just to sign small groups of books for fans. He then picks up where he leaves off. Seems to work out pretty well.

 

Others like Michael Golden prefer to only sketch during certain times and sign during others. This means that he can stick to a schedule, effectively finish his sketch list, and meet hordes of fans during the designated signing time without having his attention diverted by the sketch in his hand. To each his own. By the way, Michael Golden cut off his long ponytail. I almost didn't recognize him this weekend.

 

I will say that I strongly encourage artists who have set signing times to post them on the table. It helps to avoid having awkward exchanges regarding having a single books signed. :eek:

Link to post
Share on other sites
NYCC '10: SATURDAY.

 

An artist I approached about 1:30PM, who was sitting in artist alley skectching, refused to sign 1 book because he was "on a schedule". He was not going to sign any items till sometime in the evening, even though he was sitting in artist alley. Lame. :eyeroll:

 

If you can't sign a book, why sit in artist alley?? ???

 

 

 

Because it's not called "Autograph Alley"? (shrug)

Link to post
Share on other sites
NYCC '10: SATURDAY.

 

An artist I approached about 1:30PM, who was sitting in artist alley skectching, refused to sign 1 book because he was "on a schedule". He was not going to sign any items till sometime in the evening, even though he was sitting in artist alley. Lame. :eyeroll:

 

If you can't sign a book, why sit in artist alley?? ???

 

 

Did he have a sign out saying when he would sign next?

Link to post
Share on other sites
NYCC '10: SATURDAY.

 

An artist I approached about 1:30PM, who was sitting in artist alley skectching, refused to sign 1 book because he was "on a schedule". He was not going to sign any items till sometime in the evening, even though he was sitting in artist alley. Lame. :eyeroll:

 

If you can't sign a book, why sit in artist alley?? ???

 

 

Seriously though, you have to alter your perspective slightly to understand how your opinion may not be entirely justified.

 

If an artist takes a sketch list, that means every single person on that list made it to the table before you did. Imagine them standing in front of you. They were there first, some camped out outside before the doors opened.

 

If all those people on the sketch list were standing there waiting in line in front of you would you jump the line and get your books signed? Of course not.

 

When an artist makes an appearance he has to carefully balance the demands of his public. Some want sketches, some want photos, some want sigs. It's impossible to make everyone happy, all you can ask is that the creator make a concerted effort to try.

 

If you come up to an artist's table and he's sketching and he has a sign stating that he's sketching now, or a time when his next signing will be, and there is no one standing there waiting for a signature, that doesn't mean he's not busy, all that means is that everyone else took the time to read the signs and respect what the creator has organized as a means to make as many people as happy as possible.

 

Sometimes imagining what things are like on the other side of the table can help a lot.

Link to post
Share on other sites
NYCC '10: SATURDAY.

 

An artist I approached about 1:30PM, who was sitting in artist alley skectching, refused to sign 1 book because he was "on a schedule". He was not going to sign any items till sometime in the evening, even though he was sitting in artist alley. Lame. :eyeroll:

 

If you can't sign a book, why sit in artist alley?? ???

 

 

Seriously though, you have to alter your perspective slightly to understand how your opinion may not be entirely justified.

 

If an artist takes a sketch list, that means every single person on that list made it to the table before you did. Imagine them standing in front of you. They were there first, some camped out outside before the doors opened.

 

If all those people on the sketch list were standing there waiting in line in front of you would you jump the line and get your books signed? Of course not.

 

When an artist makes an appearance he has to carefully balance the demands of his public. Some want sketches, some want photos, some want sigs. It's impossible to make everyone happy, all you can ask is that the creator make a concerted effort to try.

 

If you come up to an artist's table and he's sketching and he has a sign stating that he's sketching now, or a time when his next signing will be, and there is no one standing there waiting for a signature, that doesn't mean he's not busy, all that means is that everyone else took the time to read the signs and respect what the creator has organized as a means to make as many people as happy as possible.

 

Sometimes imagining what things are like on the other side of the table can help a lot.

 

Yes, he did indicate he'd be signing in the evening. Perhaps you are right. I did not look at it that way.

Link to post
Share on other sites
NYCC '10: SATURDAY.

 

An artist I approached about 1:30PM, who was sitting in artist alley skectching, refused to sign 1 book because he was "on a schedule". He was not going to sign any items till sometime in the evening, even though he was sitting in artist alley. Lame. :eyeroll:

 

If you can't sign a book, why sit in artist alley?? ???

 

 

Seriously though, you have to alter your perspective slightly to understand how your opinion may not be entirely justified.

 

If an artist takes a sketch list, that means every single person on that list made it to the table before you did. Imagine them standing in front of you. They were there first, some camped out outside before the doors opened.

 

If all those people on the sketch list were standing there waiting in line in front of you would you jump the line and get your books signed? Of course not.

 

When an artist makes an appearance he has to carefully balance the demands of his public. Some want sketches, some want photos, some want sigs. It's impossible to make everyone happy, all you can ask is that the creator make a concerted effort to try.

 

If you come up to an artist's table and he's sketching and he has a sign stating that he's sketching now, or a time when his next signing will be, and there is no one standing there waiting for a signature, that doesn't mean he's not busy, all that means is that everyone else took the time to read the signs and respect what the creator has organized as a means to make as many people as happy as possible.

 

Sometimes imagining what things are like on the other side of the table can help a lot.

 

1+ Well said

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like this thread.. has some great info on how to approach and view the creators at conventions.. the one thing I had a question about was what about dealing with creators in the real world?

 

I recently found out that one of my neighbors is a comic artist. She has done a ton of covers for Marvel, Dark Horse, and some Anime stuff. I found out by ordering a print from her and when I gave her my address she thought I was joking. So of course I would like to try and get some sketches or a commission from her. I would think that just shooting her an e-mail and seeing what she says it probably the best answer but I wanted to throw it out there to see if anyone else has had this kind of experience.

Link to post
Share on other sites
I like this thread.. has some great info on how to approach and view the creators at conventions.. the one thing I had a question about was what about dealing with creators in the real world?

 

I recently found out that one of my neighbors is a comic artist. She has done a ton of covers for Marvel, Dark Horse, and some Anime stuff. I found out by ordering a print from her and when I gave her my address she thought I was joking. So of course I would like to try and get some sketches or a commission from her. I would think that just shooting her an e-mail and seeing what she says it probably the best answer but I wanted to throw it out there to see if anyone else has had this kind of experience.

 

is your neighbor Jo Chen?

Link to post
Share on other sites
lol i used my detective skills. I know she lives in VA and shes the very few that does anime style. And the Dark horse kinda gave it away :) Thats a pretty cool neighbor to have! Mine is a Pastor and the other tunes pianos :blush:
Link to post
Share on other sites

Working with Creators and Signings:

 

It’s Ok to bring some presents to the actor/artist/writer that it’s going to sign your book, Vitamins, Coke or ... it’s Ok.

 

You may get a nicer sketch or a “worst place signature”

its roulette.

 

Princess_Layover_by_AdamHughes.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

When you are trying to get a sketch on a blank cover, do people usually give it to the artist raw or prepped like it would be for a S/S but with a much bigger window??

Link to post
Share on other sites
When you are trying to get a sketch on a blank cover, do people usually give it to the artist raw or prepped like it would be for a S/S but with a much bigger window??

 

Yes

Link to post
Share on other sites

Cutting into a plastic top loader to keep the back of the book from being scuffed up helps too, unless you dont care about the book grade & only about the sketch. Then some artists also take the books out of the bag to sketch on too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Best response I ever got from a creator was David Finch about 4 years ago at WW Chicago (back when Wizard actually had DC and Marvel AT their cons and in a booth) It was Thursday night and only VIPS were on the floor. Finch got handed his name tag, which was just a pin, and got distraught because he didn't want a pinhole in his favorite t-shirt.

 

I had an extra lanyard and gave it to him and he was just tickled. Signed a bunch of stuff and did two small head sketches and a full body Spidey for me. Moral of story... pay attention and try to help.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
1 1