Ebay Seller: collectors_comics
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29 minutes ago, James J Johnson said:

Thomas Wilson (Collectors_Comics) is Mark Wilson's son. Mark and his brother Matt were restoration professionals of note back in the pre-CGC era.

and just like son, father also shares a dubious past. Apple didn't fall far from the tree.

Edited by Gotham Kid

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4 hours ago, 90sChild said:

This guy had some interesting books today.  Claims 9.6 grade on a raw silver age... yeah right I'll believe it when I see it graded.. otherwise this would be a $250 book.  If he has experience with CGC why isn't he submitting his books for grade?  Clearly he would make alot more than $50...

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Doctor-Strange-172-NEAR-MINT-9-6-NM-MARVEL-1968-Master-of-The-Mystic-Arts/352850172768?autorefresh=true

He didn't submit that book because he's full of crapola on the grade.

Looking at the front cover and forgetting about the waviness evident on the bottom edge of the book......and the damage along the top edge of the book and at the top right corner.......just flip the book over and look at the top staple on the back cover scan (see the close up I posted below).  The damage there alone means this book has zero chance at a 9.6 grade.

Staple.jpg.a795358a630d339c763613719ff24b3b.jpg

 

 

Edited by Domo Arigato

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2 hours ago, Gotham Kid said:

and just like son, father also shares a dubious past. Apple didn't fall far from the tree.

And it's very comforting to know that Mark Wilson now works for Heritage.

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Larryw7 said:

And it's very comforting to know that Mark Wilson now works for Heritage.

 

 

 

 

Funny, I don't feel the comfort....

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9 hours ago, Larryw7 said:

And it's very comforting to know that Mark Wilson now works for Heritage.

 

 

 

 

I don't understand why anyone trusts a company that is allowed to bid on their auctions.

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13 hours ago, Domo Arigato said:

He didn't submit that book because he's full of crapola on the grade.

Looking at the front cover and forgetting about the waviness evident on the bottom edge of the book......and the damage along the top edge of the book and at the top right corner.......just flip the book over and look at the top staple on the back cover scan (see the close up I posted below).  The damage there alone means this book has zero chance at a 9.6 grade.

Staple.jpg.a795358a630d339c763613719ff24b3b.jpg

 

 

That staple kept me away, along with the fact the rest of it all looked a little too tidy.  Not going to say it was restored but if there was anything like small color touch it certainly wouldn't have shown in the photos.

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10 hours ago, D84 said:

I don't understand why anyone trusts a company that is allowed to bid on their auctions.

Heritage is completely transparent. Who can bid is all fully explained in their governing guidelines and there is full accordance with Texas state law.  :gossip:

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44 minutes ago, James J Johnson said:

Heritage is completely transparent. Who can bid is all fully explained in their governing guidelines and there is full accordance with Texas state law.  :gossip:

It might be legal in Texas, but it isn't moral. And since they are so kindly transparent, we can decide for ourselves if we want to do business with them or not. For many, it's "not".

 :)



-slym

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44 minutes ago, slym2none said:

It might be legal in Texas, but it isn't moral. And since they are so kindly transparent, we can decide for ourselves if we want to do business with them or not. For many, it's "not".

 :)



-slym

Point I was making is that the bidding particulars are all clearly spelled out. All is revealed by Heritage in their auction particulars. If you're a stickler for thoroughly reading and understanding the rules before you participate in any auctions, you will have a clear understanding of how their system works.You will know beforehand that you may well end up bidding against "the house". The biggest disadvantage to winning against the house is that you can't see the exact amount of each and every bid they place, but the house can see the exact amount of your bid, thus know how much proxy headroom there is over your adjusted leading bid and your maximum bid!

But this is true of any auctioneer in Texas. Statewide, they all have the flexibility of what the state will allow.

The benefit of Heritage being clear in stating the Texas auction rules that they follow, is that you know beforehand (if you read the rules) thus IMO, no dishonesty in the equation. You can either choose not to bid under those Texas rules, or bid accordingly. Set a limit, bid an amount you'd like to pay for an item, and see where the chips fall.

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It's even worse when you live bid against an auctioneer, I've dealt with that twice. Once when it was the guy calling the auction the second was the one holding the item, both times I thought it was pre-bid..............

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11 hours ago, James J Johnson said:

Point I was making is that the bidding particulars are all clearly spelled out. All is revealed by Heritage in their auction particulars. If you're a stickler for thoroughly reading and understanding the rules before you participate in any auctions, you will have a clear understanding of how their system works.You will know beforehand that you may well end up bidding against "the house". The biggest disadvantage to winning against the house is that you can't see the exact amount of each and every bid they place, but the house can see the exact amount of your bid, thus know how much proxy headroom there is over your adjusted leading bid and your maximum bid!

But this is true of any auctioneer in Texas. Statewide, they all have the flexibility of what the state will allow.

The benefit of Heritage being clear in stating the Texas auction rules that they follow, is that you know beforehand (if you read the rules) thus IMO, no dishonesty in the equation. You can either choose not to bid under those Texas rules, or bid accordingly. Set a limit, bid an amount you'd like to pay for an item, and see where the chips fall.

Point I am making is that some people don't like it when an auction company bids on itself, and since they know that Heritage does, they don't use them.

No further explanation necessary.

 :)



-slym

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12 hours ago, James J Johnson said:

Point I was making is that the bidding particulars are all clearly spelled out. All is revealed by Heritage in their auction particulars. If you're a stickler for thoroughly reading and understanding the rules before you participate in any auctions, you will have a clear understanding of how their system works.You will know beforehand that you may well end up bidding against "the house". The biggest disadvantage to winning against the house is that you can't see the exact amount of each and every bid they place, but the house can see the exact amount of your bid, thus know how much proxy headroom there is over your adjusted leading bid and your maximum bid!

But this is true of any auctioneer in Texas. Statewide, they all have the flexibility of what the state will allow.

The benefit of Heritage being clear in stating the Texas auction rules that they follow, is that you know beforehand (if you read the rules) thus IMO, no dishonesty in the equation. You can either choose not to bid under those Texas rules, or bid accordingly. Set a limit, bid an amount you'd like to pay for an item, and see where the chips fall.

Which is why I always bid live on their auctions

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10 hours ago, unclezebo said:

It's even worse when you live bid against an auctioneer, I've dealt with that twice. Once when it was the guy calling the auction the second was the one holding the item, both times I thought it was pre-bid..............

Realistically, even in an auction, operating under the impression that the "highest bidder wins" an item will sell for whatever the auctioneer allows it to. Whether a private individual on ebay, or a huge company, if the auctioner will not allow an item to sell for less than what they want or expect to get, there are many ways to deter that from happening, whether in Texas or not, live, online, or through sealed bids.

Anonymous bidders on the phones

Shill bidding or in-house bidding

Auctions that only end once a specified amount of time has elapsed since the last bid, etc.

The only thing you can be sure of when participating in any auction is your own role in it by placing a bid for the amount you are willing to pay. No more, no less. Every other facet of the auction equation you choose to participate in is white noise.

 

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22 minutes ago, James J Johnson said:

. Every other facet of the auction equation you choose to participate in is white noise.

 

That's just, like, your opinion, man.



-slym

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2 hours ago, Nice Face said:

But there's less chance of getting shill bid up if you avoid auction houses from Texas, right?

How about on ebay? Are your chances any slimmer of being shill bid up on ebay, even if you avoided bidding on any items offered by any seller from Texas?

My advice is to bid on items by sellers who you're comfortable with. Sellers you trust. Beyond that..... good luck!  :wishluck:

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7 hours ago, SlabScab said:

Shill bidding is illegal on Ebay because they are in California, so yes. Doesn't matter where the seller is from. Same reason they'll end your listings if you try to recoup your 3% Paypal/CC fee. Doesn't matter if you're in one of the 40 states that allow it, Ebay is not in one of those states.

Based on an article on ebay shill bidding that I read on the net about a year ago, ebay can and does suspend members for shill bidding. There was language in the article about ebay instructing these sellers in one of their tutorials that shill bidding is illegal and that they may be reported to the appropriate authorities and have criminal charges filed against them. Has that changed?

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Help me to understand this...

Shill bidding is illegal in California, and because Ebay is based out of California, it is illegal to shill bid in any of their auctions. However, shill bidding IS NOT illegal in some other states. And if we lived in an alternate universe where Ebay was based out of one of those states, shill bidding would be legal in their auctions (it might not be ok, but it would be legal).

Is that right?

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1 hour ago, SlabScab said:

I hope it hasn't changed since you just reposted what I posted.

I misread your post too quickly as "legal" rather than "illegal", referencing California's legal stance on shill bidding.. By mistakenly reading legal, I thought you were reporting that the most liberal state in the nation had adopted Texas' liberal stance on shill bidding in the past year, thus the reason for my similar post, plagiarism not being the typical mainstay of my posts..

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