New to OA Collecting, Advice, tips?
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FrankJP   
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Hi,

 

I've recently become very interested in collecting published original art, along with more larger commissions.

 

I did some searching, poorly perhaps, but was just looking for general tips, advice, things that could be a benefit to a newer collector(other than to not start!). Things to stay away from, what to look for, the condition of the OA and how that is handled?

 

I've looked at covers to some more modern books, and not sure if there are any general thoughts on the OA for regular covers vs. variant covers? I've been looking mostly at covers, as I am drawn more to them, but is this a better investment over pages, or is it just based mostly on the content and artist? (While I love the art, at these prices, of course I look at longer term value).

 

How does independent OA compare versus Marvel or DC work, or does that not matter as much?

 

Basically, just wanted to learn from the experts a little, try to avoid any costly mistakes or learn the hard way on things. I've always loved the art, but not something I've ever collected and I've learned enough to know that I could always use a few tips.

 

Thanks for any help,

Frank

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malvin   
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Here is a few simple one, especially if you are just starting.

 

1. Start small, I wouldn't buy a cover as my first purchase.

 

2. Buy what you like and what you can afford, if you like independents over Marvel or DC, buy those. If you like the image of the variant cover vs the regular cover, buy that one.

 

3. Dont buy for "investment" early on. I admit I sometimes buy only because I felt it was a good deal, but if you are just starting, I would learn more about the market,

 

Malvin

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Mephisto   
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I have to disagree. Start with a cover because that is what you want. A cheap panel page will NOT compare to a full size cover and to me are not even comparable. When I sold my collection in college in 2005 I had many panel pages. When I got back into collecting after collegeI realized I didn't like panel pages much at all. Since I got back into collecting I have bought a total 1 panel page of comic book art. It was a page from Kraven's Last Hunt which is my favorite storyline. Even that didn't last long as being a panel page it just didn't do enough for me appearance wise and I used it as partial trade for a painting.

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FrankJP   
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Hi Malvin,

 

Thank you for taking the time to give some advice.

 

I'm looking around, being a bit cautious, and focusing mostly on what I like. I have purchased a cover, but I am very happy with it, but I understand your point.

 

I am not really looking at these items as an investment, as in something to make money on, but it is something I want to be cognizant of as items are not inexpensive.

 

Thanks again, and you are right in that I want to learn more about the market before diving in too much, hence my questions.

 

Thanks again, appreciate it very much!

Edited by FrankJP

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FrankJP   
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Hey Mephisto, thank you for the advice.

 

I did buy a cover as I really liked it and am happy. I haven't purchased any pages yet, but am looking into it, if I find some that are really striking. I've seen a few, some nice splash pages, but haven't pulled triggers yet.

 

I like the covers as they are often, it seems to me, the most visually striking, but of course pricey, so I can see some caution there. I am still trying to figure out what I like...a trip to a convention next year to see some in person is something I am looking forward to.

 

I guess my philosophy as I learn the market and all is to buy things that really hit a chord, only pieces that I really like from artists I really like.

 

Thanks again for taking the time to answer.

 

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mister_not_so_nice   
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but was just looking for general tips, advice, things that could be a benefit to a newer collector(other than to not start!). Things to stay away from, what to look for, the condition of the OA and how that is handled?

 

-Start SLOWLY. When I first figured out I could own an original page from a comic I spent every hour searching and every cent buying these one of a kind gems. Plus random sketches on eBay, whatever. There is more out available out there than you can afford. I remember one board member saying they spent six months "shopping" before buying their first piece. Find the stuff you are interested in, bookmark it and keep looking.

- Stay away from buying every page you "like" or "is cool." You'll be selling these for pennies on the dollar when your OA fund dries up and the piece you "really want" turns up for sale.

 

I've looked at covers to some more modern books, and not sure if there are any general thoughts on the OA for regular covers vs. variant covers?

- I Think the value will be determined more on the differing artists that whether one is a variant or not. There is still only one of each no matter how many books were published.

 

I've been looking mostly at covers, as I am drawn more to them, but is this a better investment over pages, or is it just based mostly on the content and artist? (While I love the art, at these prices, of course I look at longer term value).

- (shrug)

 

How does independent OA compare versus Marvel or DC work, or does that not matter as much?

- How do independent comics compare versus Marvel or DC? Some suck, some are better, some are worse. Is ever MARVEL comic good? Is comic art from every DC comic better than art from every Independent? I think there are way to many variables here.

 

Basically, just wanted to learn from the experts a little, try to avoid any costly mistakes or learn the hard way on things. I've always loved the art, but not something I've ever collected and I've learned enough to know that I could always use a few tips.

 

-I'm not an expert, but I play one on the CGC boards :baiting:

 

Good Luck (thumbs u

and take your time. :preach:

 

 

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FrankJP   
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Thanks again, appreciate it!

 

I wish I could buy everything I thought was cool! I spent a little toouch like that on collecting books and such, so been through that unfortunately. I do have quite the bookmark collection now though, hehe.

 

My question on publishers was I guess more of a general trend, if anything. I understand that good art is good art, but that doesn't always tell the story, or that's my perception.

 

Thanks again, appreciate it!

 

 

 

 

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alxjhnsn   
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My advice:

 

1) Buy what you like.

2) Buy what you can afford

3) Pick a theme and stick to it; it makes the experience more fun

 

Covers, panel pages, commissions, etc. doesn't matter if you follow these rules.

 

 

On the other hand if you are investing here are a few generalities (exceptions can be found):

1) Published beats unpublished

2) Covers beat splashes beat panel pages

3) Artists with a long tenure tend to be more valuable over time especially if they are strong associated with a particular character

 

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Eric Seffinga   
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As mentioned above...

 

1. Put your wallet back in your pocket. Spend several months familiarizing yourself with what is available that interests you and what those prices are like. An informed buyer is a smart buyer. Some of those pieces may sell in the meantime, but at least you will be wiser and happier in the long run.

 

2. When you do decide to buy, buy what you love. Don't worry about what the market likes or you think will make your friends jealous, or because something seems like a bargain. Buy because it kicks you in the gut and you love it. Not like it, but LOVE it. Those are the pieces that will stick with you thick or thin. Other stuff comes and goes, but those real genuine gems, they are much harder to find and you don't want to be caught cash-short when they pop up.

 

3. At the end of the day only your opinion of the piece matters. It's your money and when its all paid for and the con is over, the internet is off, its just you and the piece at home. Who cares about what anyone else thinks of your collection as long as it makes you happy.

 

4. Don't go overboard. It's way too easy to spend too much and there is always something else around the corner.

 

5. Don't buy art as investment. You can think about value of the piece when weighing what to pay or deciding to buy, but don't think it will turn X profit or even retain its value. Buy it because you want to own it and the joy it will give you. The rest should just be gravy.

 

6. Re-read and believe #1. It's soooo important to get your legs under you before the wallet comes out. There is so much variance in pricing that you could get a deal or reamed very easily and knowing the difference can save a lot of money.

 

 

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FrankJP   
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Thanks for the replies, some good information.

 

I'm feeling a bit better in that I've been pretty cautious and have been following the market for awhile, picking up just a cover. I do have several commissions and sketch covers, but I put those in separate categories(pub vs unpub).

 

My commission themes are not the most popular so I care most about what I like, rather than what others do. So, I've been watching pieces that I really like, rather than what might be otherwise popular. I still enjoy going through the commissions and covers I have and often find something new about the art, that's something I don't want to change.

 

I have no plans on making a living out of this, do not thinking of it as an investment. I do factor it in some since we're talking a fair amount of money, but it's not the intent.

 

Thanks again, this has helped with some ideas, reinforced some good practices that I will definitely follow.

 

 

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Rodey   
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Don't buy Mark Bagley New Warriors pages...those are mine! (hahahah...but seriously)

 

I got into OA about two years ago, and went a little overboard. The advice everyone here is giving you is great stuff.

 

The one big advice that took me some time to realize: there is always something else around the corner.

 

 

Edited by Rodey

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FrankJP   
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Thanks, I'm definitely listening and trying to save myself some heartache and $$ as I go forward.

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Bill C   
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I'm no expert, but imo:

 

Pick your main focus, and watch HA/ebay/CAF/comiclink, etc to see what your want list pieces go for, and to determine if they are in your budget

 

Even though the OA world is a lot more open than the comics world in a sense, I still wrote down a master want list/goal sheet of everything I was looking for (artists, titles, etc) so I don't deviate too far off track. You never know when a personal favorite piece will pop up. This also helps keep your collection streamlined with little need to trim the fat

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batman_fan   
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Hi,

 

I've recently become very interested in collecting published original art, along with more larger commissions.

 

I did some searching, poorly perhaps, but was just looking for general tips, advice, things that could be a benefit to a newer collector(other than to not start!). Things to stay away from, what to look for, the condition of the OA and how that is handled?

 

I've looked at covers to some more modern books, and not sure if there are any general thoughts on the OA for regular covers vs. variant covers? I've been looking mostly at covers, as I am drawn more to them, but is this a better investment over pages, or is it just based mostly on the content and artist? (While I love the art, at these prices, of course I look at longer term value).

 

How does independent OA compare versus Marvel or DC work, or does that not matter as much?

 

Basically, just wanted to learn from the experts a little, try to avoid any costly mistakes or learn the hard way on things. I've always loved the art, but not something I've ever collected and I've learned enough to know that I could always use a few tips.

 

Thanks for any help,

Frank

 

I will give you the steps I wished I had go through and have picked up along the way.

 

1. Join ComicArtFan.com This should be the very first thing you do. Once you join, search around to see what people own to get a sense of what sort of art grabs you.

2. Look at what is for sell. Check ComicArtFan, Heritage, Comiclink, Albert Moy, Romitaman, Anthony Synder, etc. There are links to most of the bigger art sellers on ComicArtFan.

3. Look at previous selling prices in the market analysis data section of ComicArtFan. It is pretty good to get a real rough idea of prices.

4. Don't settle, don't buy a piece to buy it. I did this early on and I have sold or am selling everything that fits into this category.

5. Be patient. Don't buy something you like, buy something you love. I haven't bought anything in over a year because I haven't found the right item.

6. When you find something you love, and you think "wow, that is way over priced, I will let it sit a while", don't! Try to negotiate a better price with the seller and buy it. Anytime I took the attitude that something was overpriced, I lost out on it because someone else loved I too and paid the price. (Daredevil 34 splash, still makes me cry today ... doh!).

7. Be nice to people. I have met a lot of great dealers and collectors and they have all been very helpful.

 

 

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chromium   
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7. Be nice to people. I have met a lot of great dealers and collectors and they have all been very helpful.

 

 

+1 :applause:

Even if you don't know anybody in the hobby, it's easy to make friends if you are civil and courteous. And the more people you get to know the more fun (and easier) it is to collect and find certain pieces that just rub you the right way. (thumbs u

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Bronty   
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My 2c to this thread is that go into it knowing that your tastes will 100% change. Whatever it is you covet now, a year from now it will be something else as once you've gained some collecting experience you will see things through very different eyes.

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*paull*   
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Learn the market... don't jump in right away. If there's stuff sitting on CAF or eBay now, for all you know it could have been there for years because it's overpriced. Look at Heritage history, talk to other collectors, and watch what sells on eBay and here.

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Romain   
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Welcome Franck and happy collecting !!!

 

one little advice : one must control himself as OA collecting can be pretty addictive and very much expensive !

:preach:

 

so what cover did you buy ?? :gossip:

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Drewsky   
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1.) Know the difference between blue line pencil and blue line printout.

2.) Find a focus like a charactor or something special to look for, which is great for getting commisons done or even searching for published pages.

3.) Be prepaired for ups and downs in your ability to find a piece and your own mode.

4.) Try to share your art passion with your wife or other, my wife loves the art aspect of comics which surprised me alot and she will go to cons with me now.

5.) Meet the artists at comic cons and know the 99% are great people that charge fair and so great work and that 1% will look at you and only see money or there handlers/managers will see you in that way. I have a few horror stories and so will you if you stick with it.

6.) lastly, know how to take care of your art! exterier walls shift in temp, lighting damages art, do not let it touch the glass and use acid free everything.

 

Good luck! -Drew

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Shemp   
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The greatest thing you'll could ever learn is just say no and walkaway. (with apologies to Nat King Cole)

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