New to OA Collecting, Advice, tips?
20 20

892 posts in this topic

2,287 posts
On 9/8/2019 at 4:57 PM, Mike R V said:

I've made these thick black foam board coverings that block out most of the light, if not all. There might be a tiny bit of refracted light getting in from somewhere, but not much. The top images, frames were too big so I didn't have a chance yet to make side closures like the bottom image, so those would be the ones to get minimal light if any. Is that enough protection or should I go ahead and add those sides in?

20190907_224250.jpg

20190908_153914.jpg

Honestly, I am paranoid about the damage which natural sunlight can do, and I am not technically trained to answer your question. I would simply not keep them anywhere near natural light, if only to avoid yellowing over time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,044 posts
On 9/8/2019 at 4:31 PM, Rick2you2 said:

Artifical light (except for "artificial sunlight" bulbs) is not a potential source of harm. 

This is 100% untrue. 

Any light will cause harm. All to varying degrees. Artificial lights are not all created equal.

After something like a full-spectrum UV bulb (which most people never have at home, barring some kind of terrarium or fish tank) the worst common bulbs are Fluorescents. They are the absolute worst. Followed by various incandescent bulbs. The least damaging light source are LED bulbs, as they carry the most limited spectrum light, and are the least harmful to art. That said, not even all LEDs are the same. It’s worth doing a little research and giving care to what you light the room/house with.

I switched our whole house over to LEDs a couple years ago now. Wouldn’t go back.

The Smithsonian limits light exposure to the Star Spangled Banner and the Declaration of Independence every day. The lighting is super dim for a reason.

Watercolor and marker are the most likely to feel the effects of fade. That said, a copic marker commission of Nightcrawler or a modern art page are hardly the Declaration of Independence. I’ve happily had several watercolors hanging in my home 2 decades, with no discernible effects. Any fading that may have happened (indistinguishable at a glance) is well worth 20 years of every day enjoyment.

I keep these pieces on walls that get no direct sunlight. Beyond that, no weirdo contraptions. No super light blocking curtains. No over the top protections. They are in my hallway. I pass them every day. Every day. Just happy to see them every time I walk past. It’s been what, 7300+ days?

I’d rather enjoy them than have them be archival pristine and have only seen them 1/10th as often or less.  

But that’s just me.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5,214 posts
35 minutes ago, ESeffinga said:

The Smithsonian limits light exposure to the Star Spangled Banner and the Declaration of Independence every day. The lighting is super dim for a reason.

This reminds me of those early John Harris paintings done with highly fugitive inks. The recommendation is to store them in flat file and only look at them occasionally in low light. As much as I'd love to own a number of those images, but up on my wall, I've stuck with the reproductions in his books instead. Those can be looked at all day every day, and when the book wears out I can replace that too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,044 posts

I’ve talked about how much I cut my collection back, and how rigidly I try and control and curate it.

The knock on effect to that, is that there is a LOT of art that I greatly enjoy seeing, but just physically, mentally or financially can never own and/or manage. My outlet for this has been art books. I have a room full of them. I really love a great art book day. Is it as much fun as a new original art day? Honestly sometimes it can be. And more importantly, it is a brilliant solution to many issues. The only one it doesn’t solve is space.  Boy those books sure do add up quick. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,287 posts
11 hours ago, ESeffinga said:

This is 100% untrue. 

Any light will cause harm. All to varying degrees. Artificial lights are not all created equal.

After something like a full-spectrum UV bulb (which most people never have at home, barring some kind of terrarium or fish tank) the worst common bulbs are Fluorescents. They are the absolute worst. Followed by various incandescent bulbs. The least damaging light source are LED bulbs, as they carry the most limited spectrum light, and are the least harmful to art. That said, not even all LEDs are the same. It’s worth doing a little research and giving care to what you light the room/house with.

I switched our whole house over to LEDs a couple years ago now. Wouldn’t go back.

The Smithsonian limits light exposure to the Star Spangled Banner and the Declaration of Independence every day. The lighting is super dim for a reason.

Watercolor and marker are the most likely to feel the effects of fade. That said, a copic marker commission of Nightcrawler or a modern art page are hardly the Declaration of Independence. I’ve happily had several watercolors hanging in my home 2 decades, with no discernible effects. Any fading that may have happened (indistinguishable at a glance) is well worth 20 years of every day enjoyment.

I keep these pieces on walls that get no direct sunlight. Beyond that, no weirdo contraptions. No super light blocking curtains. No over the top protections. They are in my hallway. I pass them every day. Every day. Just happy to see them every time I walk past. It’s been what, 7300+ days?

I’d rather enjoy them than have them be archival pristine and have only seen them 1/10th as often or less.  

But that’s just me.

 

You clearly know more than I do. I stand corrected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
371 posts

If you got things professionally framed and what not. Only thing I would say to help also prevent light to fade things beyond keeping it out of direct light is to have those uv glass/museum glass in your frame.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3,947 posts
On 9/10/2019 at 3:04 AM, ESeffinga said:

I’ve talked about how much I cut my collection back, and how rigidly I try and control and curate it.

The knock on effect to that, is that there is a LOT of art that I greatly enjoy seeing, but just physically, mentally or financially can never own and/or manage. My outlet for this has been art books. I have a room full of them. I really love a great art book day. Is it as much fun as a new original art day? Honestly sometimes it can be. And more importantly, it is a brilliant solution to many issues. The only one it doesn’t solve is space.  Boy those books sure do add up quick. :)

Books are a menace! Art books, comic history books, biographies, reprints, etc. A space eating menace!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5,214 posts
10 minutes ago, alxjhnsn said:

Books are a menace! Art books, comic history books, biographies, reprints, etc. A space eating menace!

100% correct. But the alternative is digital on a screen...NO THANK YOU.

I'm sticking with physical objects :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3,947 posts
2 hours ago, vodou said:

100% correct. But the alternative is digital on a screen...NO THANK YOU.

I'm sticking with physical objects :)

Me, too. The exception for me is what I call "airplane fodder." The stuff I read on planes and don't want to physically carry or keep forever.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 posts

Which medium fades more quickly? pencil-only art or inked art? Everything from my collection is from 2010, onward, so I imagine most of the artists were using archival quality inks and materials, but I'm not sure their life-expectancy. How quickly have some of your pieces faded when exposed to minimal light, and once they start, does the fading get exponentially worse despite whatever you do?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,709 posts
On 10/31/2019 at 12:40 PM, Mike R V said:

Which medium fades more quickly? pencil-only art or inked art? Everything from my collection is from 2010, onward, so I imagine most of the artists were using archival quality inks and materials, but I'm not sure their life-expectancy. How quickly have some of your pieces faded when exposed to minimal light, and once they start, does the fading get exponentially worse despite whatever you do?

Graphite particles don't really "fade". Inks would be more likely to, but are certainly more resistant than color. Based on all of the examples, I think the first thing you will see with a B&W inked piece is paper tanning. Modern acid-free Bristol is certainly more archival than older materials, but sun damage is still a concern. Rotate your wall pieces every few months or at least keep them out of direct sunlight and use museum plexi.

Edited by BCarter27

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
213 posts
On 10/31/2019 at 1:40 PM, BCarter27 said:

Graphite particles don't really "fade". Inks would be more likely too, but are certainly more resistant than color. Based on all of the examples, I think the first thing you will see with a B&W inked piece is paper tanning. Modern acid-free Bristol is certainly more archival than older materials, but sun damage is still a concern. Rotate your wall pieces every few months or at least keep them out of direct sunlight and use museum plexi.

How long does it take before damage is noticeable?

I think like I have a good set up, but paranoia often gets the best of me. My art on display is all framed with archival material and museum glass (or glass with equivalent light protection. The room the art is in has black out curtains and I have a dehumidifier running in the room most days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
145 posts

I'd like to to learn more about the aesthetic qualities of comic oa, things the artist is doing on the page, learn why I like the work I like and gain a better appreciation for what goes into the craft of comics. Does anyone know of any good resources for learning more about this, books or websites or anything else that have been helpful? What terms would I even search for to find more info about this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5,214 posts
38 minutes ago, NewCollector101 said:

Does anyone know of any good resources for learning more about this, books or websites or anything else that have been helpful? What terms would I even search for to find more info about this?

http://scottmccloud.com/2-print/1-uc/index.html

http://scottmccloud.com/2-print/3-mc/index.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,248 posts

Dave Gibbons' book, How Comics Work, provides a fun and educational look at his artistic process. Lots of illustrations to help explain things, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,709 posts

 

13 hours ago, NewCollector101 said:

I'd like to to learn more about the aesthetic qualities of comic oa, things the artist is doing on the page, learn why I like the work I like and gain a better appreciation for what goes into the craft of comics. Does anyone know of any good resources for learning more about this, books or websites or anything else that have been helpful? What terms would I even search for to find more info about this?

Cross-posting my reply from the other thread...

 

3 hours ago, ESeffinga said:

Understanding Comics by Scott McCloud is a great book, done in a simple and easy to follow way. It's more fun than a textbook, using the very medium he is discussing. Gary Martin and Steve Rude's Understanding Inking is a solid book as well, for understanding some of the nuts and bolts of how inking is not just a form of drawing outlines for a pencil piece, but the dynamic changes it can make to a single image. There are countless books on general art composition, theory and philosophy. I like Molly Bang's book How Pictures Work, if you want to get into a real understanding of composition

McCloud and Martin's books are great! I have to check out the Molly Bang book.

36 minutes ago, NewCollector101 said:

I think I'm gonna start with the Scott McCloud book and go from there.

I'd also add Terry Moore's drawing book as well as the magazines from Two Morrows. Rough Stuff, iirc, had a great column by Bob McLeod where he would break down sample pages and show you how to rework them. It was fascinating. And of course, their Comic Artist and Modern Masters series are just gold through and through!

https://twomorrows.com/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
20 20