New to OA Collecting, Advice, tips?
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Does anyone use dessicant bags when storing art? 

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On 9/8/2019 at 4:57 PM, Mike R V said:

I've made these thick black foam board coverings that block out most of the light, if not all. There might be a tiny bit of refracted light getting in from somewhere, but not much. The top images, frames were too big so I didn't have a chance yet to make side closures like the bottom image, so those would be the ones to get minimal light if any. Is that enough protection or should I go ahead and add those sides in?

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Honestly, I am paranoid about the damage which natural sunlight can do, and I am not technically trained to answer your question. I would simply not keep them anywhere near natural light, if only to avoid yellowing over time.

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On 9/8/2019 at 4:31 PM, Rick2you2 said:

Artifical light (except for "artificial sunlight" bulbs) is not a potential source of harm. 

This is 100% untrue. 

Any light will cause harm. All to varying degrees. Artificial lights are not all created equal.

After something like a full-spectrum UV bulb (which most people never have at home, barring some kind of terrarium or fish tank) the worst common bulbs are Fluorescents. They are the absolute worst. Followed by various incandescent bulbs. The least damaging light source are LED bulbs, as they carry the most limited spectrum light, and are the least harmful to art. That said, not even all LEDs are the same. It’s worth doing a little research and giving care to what you light the room/house with.

I switched our whole house over to LEDs a couple years ago now. Wouldn’t go back.

The Smithsonian limits light exposure to the Star Spangled Banner and the Declaration of Independence every day. The lighting is super dim for a reason.

Watercolor and marker are the most likely to feel the effects of fade. That said, a copic marker commission of Nightcrawler or a modern art page are hardly the Declaration of Independence. I’ve happily had several watercolors hanging in my home 2 decades, with no discernible effects. Any fading that may have happened (indistinguishable at a glance) is well worth 20 years of every day enjoyment.

I keep these pieces on walls that get no direct sunlight. Beyond that, no weirdo contraptions. No super light blocking curtains. No over the top protections. They are in my hallway. I pass them every day. Every day. Just happy to see them every time I walk past. It’s been what, 7300+ days?

I’d rather enjoy them than have them be archival pristine and have only seen them 1/10th as often or less.  

But that’s just me.

 

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35 minutes ago, ESeffinga said:

The Smithsonian limits light exposure to the Star Spangled Banner and the Declaration of Independence every day. The lighting is super dim for a reason.

This reminds me of those early John Harris paintings done with highly fugitive inks. The recommendation is to store them in flat file and only look at them occasionally in low light. As much as I'd love to own a number of those images, but up on my wall, I've stuck with the reproductions in his books instead. Those can be looked at all day every day, and when the book wears out I can replace that too.

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I’ve talked about how much I cut my collection back, and how rigidly I try and control and curate it.

The knock on effect to that, is that there is a LOT of art that I greatly enjoy seeing, but just physically, mentally or financially can never own and/or manage. My outlet for this has been art books. I have a room full of them. I really love a great art book day. Is it as much fun as a new original art day? Honestly sometimes it can be. And more importantly, it is a brilliant solution to many issues. The only one it doesn’t solve is space.  Boy those books sure do add up quick. :)

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11 hours ago, ESeffinga said:

This is 100% untrue. 

Any light will cause harm. All to varying degrees. Artificial lights are not all created equal.

After something like a full-spectrum UV bulb (which most people never have at home, barring some kind of terrarium or fish tank) the worst common bulbs are Fluorescents. They are the absolute worst. Followed by various incandescent bulbs. The least damaging light source are LED bulbs, as they carry the most limited spectrum light, and are the least harmful to art. That said, not even all LEDs are the same. It’s worth doing a little research and giving care to what you light the room/house with.

I switched our whole house over to LEDs a couple years ago now. Wouldn’t go back.

The Smithsonian limits light exposure to the Star Spangled Banner and the Declaration of Independence every day. The lighting is super dim for a reason.

Watercolor and marker are the most likely to feel the effects of fade. That said, a copic marker commission of Nightcrawler or a modern art page are hardly the Declaration of Independence. I’ve happily had several watercolors hanging in my home 2 decades, with no discernible effects. Any fading that may have happened (indistinguishable at a glance) is well worth 20 years of every day enjoyment.

I keep these pieces on walls that get no direct sunlight. Beyond that, no weirdo contraptions. No super light blocking curtains. No over the top protections. They are in my hallway. I pass them every day. Every day. Just happy to see them every time I walk past. It’s been what, 7300+ days?

I’d rather enjoy them than have them be archival pristine and have only seen them 1/10th as often or less.  

But that’s just me.

 

You clearly know more than I do. I stand corrected.

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If you got things professionally framed and what not. Only thing I would say to help also prevent light to fade things beyond keeping it out of direct light is to have those uv glass/museum glass in your frame.

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On 9/10/2019 at 3:04 AM, ESeffinga said:

I’ve talked about how much I cut my collection back, and how rigidly I try and control and curate it.

The knock on effect to that, is that there is a LOT of art that I greatly enjoy seeing, but just physically, mentally or financially can never own and/or manage. My outlet for this has been art books. I have a room full of them. I really love a great art book day. Is it as much fun as a new original art day? Honestly sometimes it can be. And more importantly, it is a brilliant solution to many issues. The only one it doesn’t solve is space.  Boy those books sure do add up quick. :)

Books are a menace! Art books, comic history books, biographies, reprints, etc. A space eating menace!

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10 minutes ago, alxjhnsn said:

Books are a menace! Art books, comic history books, biographies, reprints, etc. A space eating menace!

100% correct. But the alternative is digital on a screen...NO THANK YOU.

I'm sticking with physical objects :)

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2 hours ago, vodou said:

100% correct. But the alternative is digital on a screen...NO THANK YOU.

I'm sticking with physical objects :)

Me, too. The exception for me is what I call "airplane fodder." The stuff I read on planes and don't want to physically carry or keep forever.
 

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Wanted to share a perspective from a fine arts collector that argues— with refreshing logic— that Having Limited Funds Is Actually A Huge Advantage: 

“While that may sound counter-intuitive, collecting on a tight budget forces you to think through every acquisition as if it is your last. My greatest struggle as a collector today is sifting through my wish list of artists. This slower approach, however, naturally helps weed out good works from great ones. Each new piece holds significantly more weight within a small collection because it can completely enhance or alter the context of the other works. Developing the eye of a curator at the onset thus makes for well-thought-out and disciplined collecting behavior.”

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