Collectors of baseball cards striking out
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Prophetic :(

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probably not as much. baseball has been on the decline as far as i can remember. kids these days have so many more comic-related cartoons and movies. i'd be worried about digital taking over print more than a complete lack of interest.

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It could, if all we had was the front and back covers, and a character only "played" a couple years, maybe ten if we were lucky. I was into cards when I was younger, because I was into the sport. I played park district ball, and high school ball, and watched games religiously, but kids now only want to play on the computer and video games.

 

The stories of comics will always be important, and if we have good story-telling, the medium should continue.

Edited by jaster-mereel

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When was the last time you saw a sports card movie? I think the hobbies are completely different and they have different drivers. I would consider pop culture of comics to be more relevant to books that are also pop culture/cult classics.

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There are some comparisons that come out of that, but for the most part it's still apples to oranges. I do see that happening over the longer term, but comics aren't nearly as abundant as cards and have more appeal than just nostalgia.

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Boy that card show looked depressing! Think NYCC or SDCC will ever look like that?

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The scary part of that video was, it said that the baseball card market has priced out the kids and only for adults now. Prophetic?

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The scary part of that video was, it said that the baseball card market has priced out the kids and only for adults now. Prophetic?

Haven't professional sports priced out just about everyone? It could be that with all the other alternative sports that actually have some action in them, that kids could care less about a bunch of fat guys spitting for three hours, while nothing happens, let alone, collecting their photos and stats. zzz

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When I stop getting out bid on eBay and missing some great deals here on the boards. Then will I think comic book collecting is slowing down!!!

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To me it has to do with heroes. Kids can still look to spiderman, batman, captain america, superman, etc. to be heroes. There aren't any left in baseball. Who wants to collect a card of some nobody who gets overpaid to play and you don't care about. I actually remember when I stopped buying cards to buy Batman the animated series action figures. Best decision ever.

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I wish it would hurry upand die so I can start buying the comics I love for pennies in the dollar.

 

 

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I wish it would hurry upand die so I can start buying the comics I love for pennies in the dollar.

 

(worship)

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Kids today have more today to keep their time occupied than they did. Take a 12 year old kid for example in say 1965. How do you keep him quiet and keep from being bored? Read comics, go see a movie at the theater, collect baseball cards, play sports, ride a bike, watch TV, get a paper route. Compare that same 12 year old to the year 2012 and how do you keep him busy? Go online, play PS3/Xbox, text his friends on his iphone, watch a movie on his parents HD 120 inch TV. Much more now to hold his attention than watching a bunch of overpaid, juiced up cry babies.

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There are some comparisons that come out of that, but for the most part it's still apples to oranges. I do see that happening over the longer term, but comics aren't nearly as abundant as cards and have more appeal than just nostalgia.

 

+1

 

The news piece was dead-on about the baseball card hobby. I was a huge collector back in the 70s and 80s, and then got back in during the early 2000s. I soon recognized that the hobby was not the same, for many of the same reasons identified in this broadcast.

 

I then got back into comics in 2003 and I'm still here. It really is apples and oranges, though there are some relevant comparisons.

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I remember the 1991 National Sports Collectors Convention in Anaheim. It took me seven hours to get in the front door. I sold 12 cents worth of football cards for $300 to pay for my hotel room and gas. It was down hill for sports card from that high point. Card companies started packaging used sports memorabilia with cards in a lottery-like system. Card packs cost more than a comic book. I feel sorry for all those amateur investors who were expecting to send their kids to college with all the sports card that they bought.

 

 

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The person they were interviewing (grey shirt, glasses) is also a regular at the comic shows in the area. I see him all the time.

 

Baseball cards are pretty different from comics. I can't count how many people I know (myself included) in their 20s who collect comics. With movies, TV, video games and other media mixing with comics, it seems that a bubble like the baseball card one won't happen anytime soon.

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