Tales from the Island of Serendip
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19,534 posts

GUSTAVE DORE

 

Illustration for title page to The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by S.T. Coleridge (Hamilton Adams, and the Dore gallery, 1876)

 

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RICHARD DOYLE

 

'Triumphal march of the Elf King. This important personage, nearly related to the Goblin family, is conspicuous for the length of his hair, which on state occasions it requires four pages to support. Fairies in waiting strew flowers in his path, and in his train are many of the most distinguished Trolls, Kobolds, Nixies, Pixies, Wood-Sprites, birds, butterflies, and other inhabitants of the kingdom.' From In Fairyland, a poem by William Allingham with a series of pictures from the Elf-World (Longmans, Green, Reader & Dyer, 1870).

 

 

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SIDNEY SIME

 

'The sudden discovery of that infamous den, that renowned and impregnable stronghold, the fear and envy of universal wizardry, not only drowned my memory of the quest - it involved me in perilous side issues. The malevolence underlying the Pophofgf's hospitable greeting passed unheeded by me, absorbed as I was, for how long I know not, in a profound and fatal curiosity.' Original drawing for The Fantasy of Life, a series of drawings to unknown tales. For The Tatler, 28th August, 1901

 

 

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RENE BULL

 

Come fill, the cup, and in the Fire of Spring

The Winter Garment of Repentance fling:

The Bird of Time has but a little way

To fly - and Lo! The bird is on the wing.

From Quatrain VII of The Ruba'iyat of Omar Kayyam,

translated by Edward Fitzgerald (Hodder & Stoughton, 1913)

 

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RENE BULL

 

Ah Love! could thou and I with fate conspire

To grasp this sorry scheme of Things entire,

Would not w shatter it to bits - and then

Re-mould it nearer to the Heart's Desire.

 

From Quatrain L X XII of The Ruba'iyat of Omar Kayyam,

translated by Edward Fitzgerald (Hodder & Stoughton, 1913)

 

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EDMUND DULAC

 

Original watercolour for frontispiece illustration to Princess Badoura, A tale from the Arabian Nights, retold by Lawrence Housman ( Hodder & Stoughton, 1913)

 

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EDMUND DULAC

 

'The Princess burns the Elfrite to death', original for illustration to The Story of the Three Calendars from Sinbad the Sailor and other stories from the Arabian Nights (Hodder & Stoughton, 1914)

 

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EDMUND DULAC

 

'The cup of wine which she gives him each night contains a sleeping draft' Original illustration to The Story of the King of the Ebony Isles from Stories from the Arabian Nights, retold by Lawrence Housman ( Hodder & Stoughton, 1913)

 

 

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KAY NIELSEN

 

'And this time she whisked off the wig, and there lay the lad, so lovely, and white and red, just as the Princess had seen him in the morning sun' Illustration for The Widow's Son from East of the Sun and West of the Moon, Old Tales of the North by P.C. Asbjornsen and J.I. Moe (Hodder & Stoughton, 1914)

 

 

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linky: http://nielsen.artpassions.net/

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KAY NIELSEN

 

 

' " Your soul - ! My soul - !" they kept saying in hollow tones, according as they won or lost.' Illustration to John and the Ghosts from In Powder and Crinoline, Old Fairy Tales, retold by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch (Hodder & Stoughton, 1913)

 

 

 

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KAY NIELSEN

 

 

'This good fairy placed her own baby in the cradle of roses and gave command to the zephyrs to carry him to the tower.' Illustration to Felicia from In Powder and Crinoline, Old Fairy Tales, retold by Sir Arthur Quiller-Couch (Hodder & Stoughton, 1913)

 

 

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