Tales from the Island of Serendip
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Just now, Flex Mentallo said:

Love it! I definitely need a pet!

If you're looking to start with something smaller and more common,I'd suggest a budgie.Out of the many birds that have come in and out of our flat-kakarikis,ringnecks,amazons,meyers,quakers and more-Bubbalouie,a sky blue fellow we got as a baby was the most incredible.Smart,full of sauce and such a vocabulary.He even could whistle the (British) Antiques Roadshow theme! Many folk don't realize they are highly trainable,especially if you get them very young,give them a bit of extra freedom.I still miss that guy everyday when I walk into the bird room.

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That's Sausage the saucy bugger,albino ringneck,Dante the Kakariki(RIP old age) and my blue boy Bubba on the bottom.

Sorry for the interruption,back to Flex'-I have my own crypt to mess around in!

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These are nice and quiet too,unless they get out,then we just might hear you clear across the water!

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Okay,okay I'm finished lol 

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3 hours ago, Flex Mentallo said:

But do they sing?

Only the crickets they get as food,small,soothing,drive you mad when they get out chirps lol -40C° and it sounds like summer in the flat :cloud9:

Some,like the grey Indian baboon can make a low hissing noise,that's a warning,rubbing their legs together makes the sound.

Edited by porcupine48
Fat fingers hit the comma rather,than,the spacebar 😐

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Himalayas: Photographed by Yoshikazu Shirakawa

Harry N. Abrams, New York, 1971. (12 x 17 inches), 248-full page illustrations in full color and 6 fold-out color plates, 6 maps and diagrams.

 

 

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The first time that the great Himalaya, stretching 3000km from Bhutan to Afghanistan, had been photographed. Considering that several years were spent at extreme altitude in what was then a very remote part of the world with virtually none of the creature comforts that are taken for granted today, it stands as one of the greatest landscape photography achievements of all time.

 

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Edited by Flex Mentallo

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"If we were to try to hit upon a man to obtain a picture of God, it would need to be Shirakawa... This collection of photographs is an immortal, astonishing book." The New York Times

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Over 17" tall, this book is a magnificent publication. It has stood the test of time and is at least the equal of any photography book published since at least in my experience. [NB If these photos give you the urge to get one, make sure it is the first edition from 1971 as later editions are inferior in size and quality.]

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Shirakawa's work encompasses four parts of the Himalaya: Nepal, Punjab (Kashmir), Sikkim, and the Hindu Kush. He describes in his travel narratives the difficulty of creating a photo book encompassing the entirety of the range when there were so many political restrictions on where he could go and what he could photograph in the late 1960s. His perseverance served him well, however, and he got not only access but encouragement in his photography and travel in Nepal during the 1965-1969 ban on foreign visitation to the outlying areas (including the use of the King's private plane and trekking access to Everest, Annapurna, and Kanchenjunga), air access to the Afghan side of the Hindu Kush, and permission to enter Kashmir. He was thwarted, however, in his attempts to enter Garwhal, northern Pakistan, and Bhutan. His need to work on a tight schedule and a tight budget often placed his life in danger, such as trekking to Everest Base Camp without proper acclimatization or flying at dizzying heights with little or no oxygen.

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Edited by Flex Mentallo

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When you consider the quality of the color film stocks available in the late 60's & early 70's, the difficulty of shooting in extreme cold, & the difficulty of preserving the exposed film until development could take place; the end results are even more remarkable.

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