Best auction site to sell OA - Heritage, ComicLink or ComicConnect
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Or this, the first and only Ditko page to break $100K to date? I think it's also a record for any Silver Age panel page, Kirby included. It compares favorably to any Silver Age result you can find as having sold on Heritage. -Josh

http://www.comiclink.com/itemdetail.asp?id=932967&showprice=1

 

 

FF 55 page @ 155K, right? Not as many panels, but still a panel page.

 

Not to bust your balls though, Heritage takes such a giant bite that I'd tend to sell with C-Link, I think.

 

Thanks :)

I'd consider the FF 55 page a half splash. Heritage did too, as you can see from the title:

 

"Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott Fantastic Four #55 Spectacular Silver Surfer Half-Splash Page 3 Original Art"

 

It's also the best Kirby Surfer image that has ever come to market in a public auction format.

 

Half-splash? Isn't that a contradiction in terms? :preach:

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Or this, the first and only Ditko page to break $100K to date? I think it's also a record for any Silver Age panel page, Kirby included. It compares favorably to any Silver Age result you can find as having sold on Heritage. -Josh

http://www.comiclink.com/itemdetail.asp?id=932967&showprice=1

 

 

FF 55 page @ 155K, right? Not as many panels, but still a panel page.

 

Not to bust your balls though, Heritage takes such a giant bite that I'd tend to sell with C-Link, I think.

 

Thanks :)

I'd consider the FF 55 page a half splash. Heritage did too, as you can see from the title:

 

"Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott Fantastic Four #55 Spectacular Silver Surfer Half-Splash Page 3 Original Art"

 

It's also the best Kirby Surfer image that has ever come to market in a public auction format.

 

Half-splash? Isn't that a contradiction in terms? :preach:

 

It may be, but it's a pretty common contradiction, and they do go for more money.

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Or this, the first and only Ditko page to break $100K to date? I think it's also a record for any Silver Age panel page, Kirby included. It compares favorably to any Silver Age result you can find as having sold on Heritage. -Josh

http://www.comiclink.com/itemdetail.asp?id=932967&showprice=1

 

 

FF 55 page @ 155K, right? Not as many panels, but still a panel page.

 

Not to bust your balls though, Heritage takes such a giant bite that I'd tend to sell with C-Link, I think.

 

Thanks :)

I'd consider the FF 55 page a half splash. Heritage did too, as you can see from the title:

 

"Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott Fantastic Four #55 Spectacular Silver Surfer Half-Splash Page 3 Original Art"

 

It's also the best Kirby Surfer image that has ever come to market in a public auction format.

 

Half-splash? Isn't that a contradiction in terms? :preach:

 

It may be, but it's a pretty common contradiction, and they do go for more money.

 

You got me there! I believe I have myself paid a wee premium here and there for a page with a larger than average panel on it (shrug)

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Or this, the first and only Ditko page to break $100K to date? I think it's also a record for any Silver Age panel page, Kirby included. It compares favorably to any Silver Age result you can find as having sold on Heritage. -Josh

http://www.comiclink.com/itemdetail.asp?id=932967&showprice=1

 

 

FF 55 page @ 155K, right? Not as many panels, but still a panel page.

 

Not to bust your balls though, Heritage takes such a giant bite that I'd tend to sell with C-Link, I think.

 

Thanks :)

I'd consider the FF 55 page a half splash. Heritage did too, as you can see from the title:

 

"Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott Fantastic Four #55 Spectacular Silver Surfer Half-Splash Page 3 Original Art"

 

It's also the best Kirby Surfer image that has ever come to market in a public auction format.

 

Half-splash? Isn't that a contradiction in terms? :preach:

 

It may be, but it's a pretty common contradiction, and they do go for more money.

 

You got me there! I believe I have myself paid a wee premium here and there for a page with a larger than average panel on it (shrug)

 

The Spiderman page would be a 1/3 splash.

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Or this, the first and only Ditko page to break $100K to date? I think it's also a record for any Silver Age panel page, Kirby included. It compares favorably to any Silver Age result you can find as having sold on Heritage. -Josh

http://www.comiclink.com/itemdetail.asp?id=932967&showprice=1

 

 

FF 55 page @ 155K, right? Not as many panels, but still a panel page.

 

Not to bust your balls though, Heritage takes such a giant bite that I'd tend to sell with C-Link, I think.

 

Thanks :)

I'd consider the FF 55 page a half splash. Heritage did too, as you can see from the title:

 

"Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott Fantastic Four #55 Spectacular Silver Surfer Half-Splash Page 3 Original Art"

 

It's also the best Kirby Surfer image that has ever come to market in a public auction format.

 

Half-splash? Isn't that a contradiction in terms? :preach:

 

It may be, but it's a pretty common contradiction, and they do go for more money.

 

You got me there! I believe I have myself paid a wee premium here and there for a page with a larger than average panel on it (shrug)

 

The Spiderman page would be a 1/3 splash.

 

Or a panel page with one long horizontal panel. 6 panels on that page as opposed to 3 large ones on the FF 55 page. Different animal.

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Or this, the first and only Ditko page to break $100K to date? I think it's also a record for any Silver Age panel page, Kirby included. It compares favorably to any Silver Age result you can find as having sold on Heritage. -Josh

http://www.comiclink.com/itemdetail.asp?id=932967&showprice=1

 

 

FF 55 page @ 155K, right? Not as many panels, but still a panel page.

 

Not to bust your balls though, Heritage takes such a giant bite that I'd tend to sell with C-Link, I think.

 

Thanks :)

I'd consider the FF 55 page a half splash. Heritage did too, as you can see from the title:

 

"Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott Fantastic Four #55 Spectacular Silver Surfer Half-Splash Page 3 Original Art"

 

It's also the best Kirby Surfer image that has ever come to market in a public auction format.

 

Half-splash? Isn't that a contradiction in terms? :preach:

 

It may be, but it's a pretty common contradiction, and they do go for more money.

 

You got me there! I believe I have myself paid a wee premium here and there for a page with a larger than average panel on it (shrug)

 

The Spiderman page would be a 1/3 splash.

 

Or a panel page with one long horizontal panel. 6 panels on that page as opposed to 3 large ones on the FF 55 page. Different animal.

 

actually no, 1/3 splash

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I've sold on comiclink once.....got a good price on the art I sold and was paid promptly, i had a freind that sold on heritage and ha to wait over 6 weeks to get paid.I had a very good experience and the fact that Josh is posting here and having a dialogue in regard to his his business is telling in my opinion. Heritage sells all kinds of stuff, comiclink focuses on comics......enogh of my a** kissing :)

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Or this, the first and only Ditko page to break $100K to date? I think it's also a record for any Silver Age panel page, Kirby included. It compares favorably to any Silver Age result you can find as having sold on Heritage. -Josh

http://www.comiclink.com/itemdetail.asp?id=932967&showprice=1

 

 

FF 55 page @ 155K, right? Not as many panels, but still a panel page.

 

Not to bust your balls though, Heritage takes such a giant bite that I'd tend to sell with C-Link, I think.

 

Thanks :)

I'd consider the FF 55 page a half splash. Heritage did too, as you can see from the title:

 

"Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott Fantastic Four #55 Spectacular Silver Surfer Half-Splash Page 3 Original Art"

 

It's also the best Kirby Surfer image that has ever come to market in a public auction format.

 

Half-splash? Isn't that a contradiction in terms? :preach:

 

It may be, but it's a pretty common contradiction, and they do go for more money.

 

You got me there! I believe I have myself paid a wee premium here and there for a page with a larger than average panel on it (shrug)

 

The Spiderman page would be a 1/3 splash.

 

Or a panel page with one long horizontal panel. 6 panels on that page as opposed to 3 large ones on the FF 55 page. Different animal.

 

actually no, 1/3 splash

 

It's true, once you start down that road, why stop? ...Kirby pages with four 1/4 splashes do tend to go for more than the ones with 6 1/6 splashes, all other things being equal. The problem is that people might make fun of you if you offer a 1/3 splash, though I think it might have been tried!

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Or this, the first and only Ditko page to break $100K to date? I think it's also a record for any Silver Age panel page, Kirby included. It compares favorably to any Silver Age result you can find as having sold on Heritage. -Josh

http://www.comiclink.com/itemdetail.asp?id=932967&showprice=1

 

 

FF 55 page @ 155K, right? Not as many panels, but still a panel page.

 

Not to bust your balls though, Heritage takes such a giant bite that I'd tend to sell with C-Link, I think.

 

Thanks :)

I'd consider the FF 55 page a half splash. Heritage did too, as you can see from the title:

 

"Jack Kirby and Joe Sinnott Fantastic Four #55 Spectacular Silver Surfer Half-Splash Page 3 Original Art"

 

It's also the best Kirby Surfer image that has ever come to market in a public auction format.

 

Half-splash? Isn't that a contradiction in terms? :preach:

 

It may be, but it's a pretty common contradiction, and they do go for more money.

 

You got me there! I believe I have myself paid a wee premium here and there for a page with a larger than average panel on it (shrug)

 

The Spiderman page would be a 1/3 splash.

 

Or a panel page with one long horizontal panel. 6 panels on that page as opposed to 3 large ones on the FF 55 page. Different animal.

 

actually no, 1/3 splash

 

It's true, once you start down that road, why stop? ...Kirby pages with four 1/4 splashes do tend to go for more than the ones with 6 1/6 splashes, all other things being equal. The problem is that people might make fun of you if you offer a 1/3 splash, though I think it might have been tried!

 

I have actually seen it several times on advertised pieces, and I agree, a 4 panel can go for more that an 6 panel (assuming equivalent content).

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I'd love ComicLick a LOT more if:

 

1) They had an archive of previous sales

2) They had a watch list facility.

 

I'm scared of tracking bids for fear I'd win it. (Sad, but true).

 

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In other words, half-splash is wildly_fanciful_statement, and we all know it. The FF 55 page was a real good panel page, and part of its goodness was big panels. The Spidey page was a real good panel page also, and part of it's goodness was one pretty big panel. Both auction houses sold the mess out of those pages and realized excellent prices. That said, when I take my 2 panel Kirby page to Comiclink to sell, someday in the far distant future, I hope they call it some kind of splash all day long!

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I'd love ComicLick a LOT more if:

 

1) They had an archive of previous sales

2) They had a watch list facility.

 

I'm scared of tracking bids for fear I'd win it. (Sad, but true).

 

I think there is some sort of watching ability, but you won't see the finished price in your "my comiclink" page after the auction ends

 

Malvin

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I'd love ComicLick a LOT more if:

 

1) They had an archive of previous sales

2) They had a watch list facility.

 

I'm scared of tracking bids for fear I'd win it. (Sad, but true).

Clink needs a site redesign. Very much so. Same as ComicConnect and Hake's. And Spencer. All are painful to navigate and (probably) lose bids/sales on mid-tier and lower value items because of this. Casual collectors...casually move on.

 

C'mon guys...check out the competition, other online OA dealers, other online auction sites with dedicated audiences (not just OA, but all niche-servicing sites). Poll your customers that used to spend with you, but haven't in the last 6-12 months. Ask them what they like about other venues that may be lacking on yours. Grow your business in ways other than fighting over consignments! You're all doing well enough to stay in business and should be able to 'invest' back into your businesses...at least a few grand, right? It can be done and we'll all love you more for it and reward you with more bids :)

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I agree, not having an archive is disappointing

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I think both Heritage and ComicLink can point to certain advantages and past victories. What is undeniable, though, is that the OA hobby as a whole is better off for having two very strong competitors - is there any doubt that Heritage's revised commission scale was a direct result of competition from ComicLink (and ComicConnect to some extent)? Just look at Heritage's Illustration Art auctions, which carry a 25% buyer's premium now as there is no strong #2 player successfully competing, in part, on lower commission rates.

 

I'm a happy client and big supporter of Heritage, but I want to see ComicLink and ComicConnect do well too, as it benefits everyone. 2c

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I agree, not having an archive is disappointing

 

+2

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Heritage's website and catelog's are second to none. C-Link does get some primo consignments as does CC.

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As a buyer, it seems that the best place for people to sell would be HA. I'm an OA addict and hunt/think about this stuff daily, and even though that's the case I barely look at ComicLink or ComicConnect because IMO those sites are such a PITA. I spend time on (and $ with) HA.

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Necromancy bump!

 

Considering consigning a couple of covers soon, probably worth somewhere in the $2500-$4000 range. I've been looking through these old threads, but haven't located a more recent discussion. Some three years later, is there more of a consensus, or anything I should watch for? Most of these discussion seem to indicate that CLink may be the best fit for my needs. Thanks as always!

 

FFF

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In my opinion from experience (full disclosure, I've sold on Comic Link and Heritage on multiple occasions, but not Comic Connect).

 

I think the sellers premiums for consignments is negotiable, but navigate between 5% to 10% generally. I speculate if your consignment is high profile and high dollar, you can negotiate lower fees, especially with Heritage, since they collect their buyers premium fees, so can even go to 0% sellers commissions and still profit, where ComicLink only has the sellers commission as their source of revenue.

 

My ranking and rationale is as follows:

 

#1 = Comic Link

 

PROS

 

* Their client services is second to none. Doug is a stellar executive at Comic Link and their staff supporting their clients have provided that proverbial white glove service and red carpet treatment, fulfilling my needs and requests. They respond to emails promptly with detailed communication. This speaks volumes to me as a seller.

 

* As a buyer, they don't charge a "premium" and as a seller, there's a belief that bidders do calculate their "all-in" totals as they bid, as I personally do. So, a $3,000 bid at Comic Link means the buyer pays $3k (+ shipping). Where a $3k bid at Heritage means the buyer pays a buyer's premium (and if you're unfortunate enough to live in CA, NY, FL or TX, states where you have to pay sales tax), which can add 20-30% to your bid total. In that way, as a seller, if a bidder was willing to pay $4k for your item and did pay that much out of pocket, at ComicLink, let's say at 10% commission you'd net $3,600. At Heritage, the bidder would have to bid around $3,200 and pay $4k after fees factored in and at a 10% commission, you'd net under $3k, so you can see the potential impact. It's all theoretical 'tho assuming both auction houses could earn you the same price.

 

* They do advertise and promote their auctions well with a catalog and are respected in the community/hobby as a source of great material.

 

* They tend to attract buyers of Silver, Copper, Bronze and Modern age artwork. I believe their barometer is a minimum of a $300 value for popular material in their featured auctions, with most averaging $1k+, and anything lower is assigned to their focused auction. In this way, I feel ComicLink has a great assortment of "something for almost everyone" in every budget, which is nice.

 

CONS

 

* There's always that proverbial "what if?" question mark about their format, which allows for last minute bid snipers to win auctions as the clock ticks down to the final second. Whereas, with Heritage, there is that live auction "going once, going twice... wait a minute... not gone yet... we hae another bid..." format which lends itself to encourage and support bidding wars which of course always is in the best interests of a seller.

 

* I'm not a fan of the reserve reveal before the auction ends, having the next bid being where the reserve is, so that the subsequent bidder triggers the reserve to be met. I think it should be left as a mystery and let the bidders tease the bids up 'til one possibly hits it (or not).

 

 

#2 = Heritage

 

PROS

 

* I do like their format which does not allow for sniping in their live auction / floor auction. Their internet auction I believe also has a "refresh" feature that resets the clock once a bid occurs allowing time for those considering to bid, to actually bid. The bidding process is easy through phone, internet or live/in-person. I've done all 3 and never had a system crash or incident that didn't allow me to bid. As a seller, you like to hear that.

 

* Their catalog is great, very robust and professional presentation.

 

* They do promote their auctions well.

 

* They tend to cater to the higher end art collectors, excluding a lot of modern material. I believe their barometer to accept consignments is a minimum estimated value of $3k per piece for their auction. Lower valued material either goes to their internet only bidding section or relegated to their weekly Sunday Internet auction, or even declined.

 

CONS

 

* Their customer service is sub-par from my experience, especially in comparison to ComicLink. Emails were unanswered, not responded to. Items earmarked for the floor live auction were subsequently (without notification or approval) pushed into the less appealing internet only bidding lots.

 

* The buyers premium can be detrimental to the seller for reasons stated above.

 

 

#3 = Comic Connect

 

Since I have no experience with Comic Connect, it would be unfair for me to judge them. I will say my perception is that they're underneath the radar with many collectors being oblivious to their offerings, which as a seller, you don't want to hear.

 

I speculate Comic Connect is probably equal to Heritages efforts on their Sunday Internet Weekly Auctions or Comic Link's Focused Auctions, but can't compete right now against Comic Link's Featured Auction or Heritage's Signature Auctions.

 

#4 = eBay

 

PROS

 

* You control your own listings, including the write ups and pricing.

 

* If you don't sell the item for what you want, you can continue to relist it and test the pricing.

 

* They have both the auction format and the store (buy it now or best offer) option.

 

CONS

 

* The "FleaBay" reputation of being the feeding ground of junk

 

* As a seller, there's the risk of buyer fraud with little recourse or protection.

 

* Customer service for sellers is near non existent.

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