Comics, Pulps, and Paperbacks: Why such a discrepancy in values?
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image.jpg16_zpsjftzl13w.jpg

 

Wow

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me1_zpsf59dd0cb.jpg

 

 

Little Annie Fanny?

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I sold a copy of this Man's Daring September 1963 on ebay in February 2008 for $18.00.

 

Lewis Forro

 

You should tell them some stories about the California Movie Mags...... or that huge paperback collection you recently found....GOD BLESS...

 

-jimbo(a friend of jesus) (thumbs u

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Typically bonkers mad doctor trope (cover by Norm Eastman, who is perhaps the most strongly collected, along with Norman Saunders):

 

Are you aware of any semi-comprehensive listing of the sweats with artist credits included?

 

http://www.philsp.com/mfi2.html

 

Great stuff! Thank you.

 

(thumbs u

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TrueMenJuly1962_zpsb687aed1.jpg

 

Another one that catches the eye/

 

Oh man! There are so many! And the inside pages were loaded with great illustrations too.

 

When I first heard the term "pulps" in the context of collectible magazines, I actually thought the reference was to these sweat magazines. When I found out otherwise, I couldn't understand why the pulp magazines were more highly prized than the sweats. The cover art on the pulps was pallid in comparison to that of the sweats, and the sweats also had plenty of great interior art unlike the pulps which had basically no interior art.

 

Plus the sweats had far more useful how-to and human interest features of course....

 

Once again, I think the pulps might have been bought and read by older kids in the twenties, thirties and forties. Therefore once these kids grew up and the warm glow of nostalgia for their younger days set in, the pulps became collectible.

 

By the sixties, however, titty mags had cropped up on the stands and these provided much more of a lure for young boys graduating from comic mags than did the sweats. Speaking from my own personal experience, in 1964 I was buying DC comic mags, Mad, Drag Cartoons, Creepy and Eerie started drawing my interest in 1965 and Playboy and other titty mags became my rags of choice in 1967. The sweats I just viewed as a curiousity, something that might be bought by older working class men.

 

So I never bought the sweats even as a young teen. Ergo nostalgia just didn't come into play for me when it came to the sweats.

 

(shrug)

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