Torn about this AF15
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The fee is waived if using CCS (which I wasn't aware of). Again, I am just throwing this out if the presser (whoever it was) had a similar service or disclaimer which puts the burden on the submitter to ensure the book is a good candidate.

 

 

Store credit is nice but it really doesn't 'compensate' the submitter.

 

Bob, my post was only wondering if the presser does screen prior to pressing or has something similar to CCS where the burden for good pressing candidates is on the submitter.

 

Looking back at CCS services, I note that the max value for QuickPress is $200 so this wasn't even an option if that was the service used. My error for throwing this out there.

 

 

Yeah, I can almost guarantee this wasn't a CCS press job. Although I do press some of my own stuff I've used Matt on a couple higher value books that I felt needed his expertise. The submitter would have gotten a call.

 

:/

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This got a lot more interesting...

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Also, :eek:

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Hi All. This book was submitted through CCS. I called Dave, left a voicemail, and also emailed him as of Thursday, so I'm not sure why he made this post only two days ago. The book was not screened before pressing. It was also not previously CGC graded, so there was no definitive way to tell when or how the staples popped. I do check all books before they leave here, but at that point, I would not be able to tell how the cover came loose.

 

The book has a good bit of damage besides the detached staples, so I'm not really sure what effect this had on the grade.

 

This is a good time to reiterate, please PLEASE be cautious about submitting tanned or fragile books, especially if they have weak spines. If you have any doubt, utilize the screening service. Otherwise, it's going to get pressed. There are many times I will reject books during the process, but only if I catch them. And even then there are books that split or pop without warning (like those '60s DC books that have notorious staple pops for no reason).

 

Matt

 

Not to be argumentative, but I'm wondering whether screening before pressing might be thought of as serving two purposes:

 

1. Can defects in this book be improved with a press? (this would be the service people would receive when paying for a screen)

 

2. Is the book too fragile to be pressed?

 

It seems as if 2. is something many submitters would hope to receive feedback on without having to pay for it. Otherwise I'm left wondering whether:

 

a) books are being pressed even though the person doing the pressing realizes there is a significant likelihood of the book being damaged but presses it anyway because the submitter didn't pay for a screen

 

or

 

b) the pressing process is so hurried that the presser isn't bothering to look the book over first to see whether a press is likely to damage it

 

Just my thoughts on this episode.

 

Well said. It seems extremely careless IMO. It leaves me wondering how experienced the person pressing the book can really be? I just don't get how this can happen.

 

Isn't the fee waived since it was submitted as a walkthrough? Why does the box need to be checked if that is the case? Isn't the whole point of waiving the fee because it is a walkthough and a high value book that will be handled with more care and screened anyway?

 

Kudos to Matt for owning up to this here in the thread, I just really think this process needs to be looked at closely and reworked. I know I am not alone with worrying when my high value books are not in my possession and when I send them out I like to feel 100% confident they will be treated with the utmost care.

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Do we know for certain that the book was damaged from pressing and not shipping or handling? (shrug)

The week of 06-16 I received an email from Cynthia Ritchie at CCS that the order had been received safe for what it is worth, no indication of damage to the container. I sent the AF15 and a Tales to Astonish 13 in the same container, in a top loader. The TTA 13 looks to be in exactly the same condition as when it was sent, no tears that were not present when the book was sent to CCS.

 

I'm not saying the book wasn't damaged during pressing. It's very possible that it was.

 

But does Cynthia know what the book looked like before you shipped it? She may have seen it in it's present form after opening the box. (shrug)

 

And I think it's important to state that I think shipping the book in a top loader is probably a big mistake. :foryou:

 

Even if the book is in a bag and board and then in the top loader, if you don't have the book sandwiched in the bag/board to keep it from moving (meaning moving within the bag), that book would slide around in the bag/board combo every single time that package would be jostled. :eek:

 

That why no matter what type of book I'm shipping, if it's in a Mylar or bag / board it is always sandwiched tight between two flat, strong pieces of cardboard.

 

Even though the top loader would prevent damage if the package was bent, that very fragile book sliding around very likely could introduce all sorts of new damage to the book in much the same way that shaking a CGC case might damage a book.

 

I'm really sorry about the damage. I hate it whenever a piece of history gets ruined and I feel for you. It's happened to me.

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Hi All. This book was submitted through CCS. I called Dave, left a voicemail, and also emailed him as of Thursday, so I'm not sure why he made this post only two days ago. The book was not screened before pressing. It was also not previously CGC graded, so there was no definitive way to tell when or how the staples popped. I do check all books before they leave here, but at that point, I would not be able to tell how the cover came loose.

 

The book has a good bit of damage besides the detached staples, so I'm not really sure what effect this had on the grade.

 

This is a good time to reiterate, please PLEASE be cautious about submitting tanned or fragile books, especially if they have weak spines. If you have any doubt, utilize the screening service. Otherwise, it's going to get pressed. There are many times I will reject books during the process, but only if I catch them. And even then there are books that split or pop without warning (like those '60s DC books that have notorious staple pops for no reason).

 

Matt

 

Not to be argumentative, but I'm wondering whether screening before pressing might be thought of as serving two purposes:

 

1. Can defects in this book be improved with a press? (this would be the service people would receive when paying for a screen)

 

2. Is the book too fragile to be pressed?

 

It seems as if 2. is something many submitters would hope to receive feedback on without having to pay for it. Otherwise I'm left wondering whether:

 

a) books are being pressed even though the person doing the pressing realizes there is a significant likelihood of the book being damaged but presses it anyway because the submitter didn't pay for a screen

 

or

 

b) the pressing process is so hurried that the presser isn't bothering to look the book over first to see whether a press is likely to damage it

 

Just my thoughts on this episode.

 

Both 1 and 2 are exactly what the screening is for. I've always offered screening, and a lot of people don't choose it. Regardless, if I come across a book that appears too fragile, I reject it. I never press a book just for a fee if there's a chance of damage. Otherwise I'm left with an unhappy client.

 

But sometimes I determine it's safe, and something happens anyway. Sometimes there are no warnings; the book seems secure on the staples and no sign of tanning.

 

People press a lot of AF #15's because there's substantial value increase in almost every grade. So we get many 2.0's, 3.0's, etc through here, which is not the case with most books we press. Naturally, low grades means more defects to contend with in the pressing process.

 

No one is rushing through press jobs here. I will continue working on books past their deadline if need be to make sure they are done to my satisfaction.

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Hi All. This book was submitted through CCS. I called Dave, left a voicemail, and also emailed him as of Thursday, so I'm not sure why he made this post only two days ago. The book was not screened before pressing. It was also not previously CGC graded, so there was no definitive way to tell when or how the staples popped. I do check all books before they leave here, but at that point, I would not be able to tell how the cover came loose.

 

The book has a good bit of damage besides the detached staples, so I'm not really sure what effect this had on the grade.

 

This is a good time to reiterate, please PLEASE be cautious about submitting tanned or fragile books, especially if they have weak spines. If you have any doubt, utilize the screening service. Otherwise, it's going to get pressed. There are many times I will reject books during the process, but only if I catch them. And even then there are books that split or pop without warning (like those '60s DC books that have notorious staple pops for no reason).

 

Matt

 

No dog in this fight, but the bolded part seems concerning to me… I would think it would be natural to look at a major key like this and for you to be aware of it. I don't know what sort of volume you are doing, but this sends up all sorts of red flags in my mind. I also don't think these comments give anyone reassurance.

 

The CCS/CGC team-up was controversial when it started. I think there are glaring issues here and I think this comment is concerning.

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Hi All. This book was submitted through CCS. I called Dave, left a voicemail, and also emailed him as of Thursday, so I'm not sure why he made this post only two days ago. The book was not screened before pressing. It was also not previously CGC graded, so there was no definitive way to tell when or how the staples popped. I do check all books before they leave here, but at that point, I would not be able to tell how the cover came loose.

 

The book has a good bit of damage besides the detached staples, so I'm not really sure what effect this had on the grade.

 

This is a good time to reiterate, please PLEASE be cautious about submitting tanned or fragile books, especially if they have weak spines. If you have any doubt, utilize the screening service. Otherwise, it's going to get pressed. There are many times I will reject books during the process, but only if I catch them. And even then there are books that split or pop without warning (like those '60s DC books that have notorious staple pops for no reason).

 

Matt

 

Not to be argumentative, but I'm wondering whether screening before pressing might be thought of as serving two purposes:

 

1. Can defects in this book be improved with a press? (this would be the service people would receive when paying for a screen)

 

2. Is the book too fragile to be pressed?

 

It seems as if 2. is something many submitters would hope to receive feedback on without having to pay for it. Otherwise I'm left wondering whether:

 

a) books are being pressed even though the person doing the pressing realizes there is a significant likelihood of the book being damaged but presses it anyway because the submitter didn't pay for a screen

 

or

 

b) the pressing process is so hurried that the presser isn't bothering to look the book over first to see whether a press is likely to damage it

 

Just my thoughts on this episode.

 

Well said. It seems extremely careless IMO. It leaves me wondering how experienced the person pressing the book can really be? I just don't get how this can happen.

 

Isn't the fee waived since it was submitted as a walkthrough? Why does the box need to be checked if that is the case? Isn't the whole point of waiving the fee because it is a walkthough and a high value book that will be handled with more care and screened anyway?

 

Kudos to Matt for owning up to this here in the thread, I just really think this process needs to be looked at closely and reworked. I know I am not alone with worrying when my high value books are not in my possession and when I send them out I like to feel 100% confident they will be treated with the utmost care.

 

No need to worry. It's unfortunate that this book has to be brought up on the boards, while thousands of success jobs go unnoticed. I have by far the most experience pressing high value books in the hobby. Pressing low grade books is simply more of a challenge because of a litany of defects that could be present.

 

You brought up an excellent point...walk-thru screens are waived if the book is pressed. There is still a fee if the book is rejected and sent back to the client.

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Hi All. This book was submitted through CCS. I called Dave, left a voicemail, and also emailed him as of Thursday, so I'm not sure why he made this post only two days ago. The book was not screened before pressing. It was also not previously CGC graded, so there was no definitive way to tell when or how the staples popped. I do check all books before they leave here, but at that point, I would not be able to tell how the cover came loose.

 

The book has a good bit of damage besides the detached staples, so I'm not really sure what effect this had on the grade.

 

This is a good time to reiterate, please PLEASE be cautious about submitting tanned or fragile books, especially if they have weak spines. If you have any doubt, utilize the screening service. Otherwise, it's going to get pressed. There are many times I will reject books during the process, but only if I catch them. And even then there are books that split or pop without warning (like those '60s DC books that have notorious staple pops for no reason).

 

Matt

 

No dog in this fight, but the bolded part seems concerning to me… I would think it would be natural to look at a major key like this and for you to be aware of it. I don't know what sort of volume you are doing, but this sends up all sorts of red flags in my mind. I also don't think these comments give anyone reassurance.

 

The CCS/CGC team-up was controversial when it started. I think there are glaring issues here and I think this comment is concerning.

 

I did look at the book beforehand and determined it was safe to press. The screening service is mainly used for potential upgrade, and is up to the client to choose. But beyond that, I am always rejecting books for tanning, weak spines, chips hanging, etc. If you saw a dozen threads a month popping up, then you should be concerned.

 

the CCS/CGC merger is not the issue. I actually have had much more time to focus on pressing as a service since I got out of dealing.

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Hi All. This book was submitted through CCS. I called Dave, left a voicemail, and also emailed him as of Thursday, so I'm not sure why he made this post only two days ago. The book was not screened before pressing. It was also not previously CGC graded, so there was no definitive way to tell when or how the staples popped. I do check all books before they leave here, but at that point, I would not be able to tell how the cover came loose.

 

The book has a good bit of damage besides the detached staples, so I'm not really sure what effect this had on the grade.

 

This is a good time to reiterate, please PLEASE be cautious about submitting tanned or fragile books, especially if they have weak spines. If you have any doubt, utilize the screening service. Otherwise, it's going to get pressed. There are many times I will reject books during the process, but only if I catch them. And even then there are books that split or pop without warning (like those '60s DC books that have notorious staple pops for no reason).

 

Matt

 

No dog in this fight, but the bolded part seems concerning to me… I would think it would be natural to look at a major key like this and for you to be aware of it. I don't know what sort of volume you are doing, but this sends up all sorts of red flags in my mind. I also don't think these comments give anyone reassurance.

 

The CCS/CGC team-up was controversial when it started. I think there are glaring issues here and I think this comment is concerning.

 

I did look at the book beforehand and determined it was safe to press. The screening service is mainly used for potential upgrade, and is up to the client to choose. But beyond that, I am always rejecting books for tanning, weak spines, chips hanging, etc. If you saw a dozen threads a month popping up, then you should be concerned.

 

the CCS/CGC merger is not the issue. I actually have had much more time to focus on pressing as a service since I got out of dealing.

 

I'm sorry I don't want to split hairs and I have heard good things about your company. However, how can you say in one post the book was not screened and then in another say you did look at the book? That just doesn't make sense…

 

Just my 2c

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Hi All. This book was submitted through CCS. I called Dave, left a voicemail, and also emailed him as of Thursday, so I'm not sure why he made this post only two days ago. The book was not screened before pressing. It was also not previously CGC graded, so there was no definitive way to tell when or how the staples popped. I do check all books before they leave here, but at that point, I would not be able to tell how the cover came loose.

 

The book has a good bit of damage besides the detached staples, so I'm not really sure what effect this had on the grade.

 

This is a good time to reiterate, please PLEASE be cautious about submitting tanned or fragile books, especially if they have weak spines. If you have any doubt, utilize the screening service. Otherwise, it's going to get pressed. There are many times I will reject books during the process, but only if I catch them. And even then there are books that split or pop without warning (like those '60s DC books that have notorious staple pops for no reason).

 

Matt

 

No dog in this fight, but the bolded part seems concerning to me… I would think it would be natural to look at a major key like this and for you to be aware of it. I don't know what sort of volume you are doing, but this sends up all sorts of red flags in my mind. I also don't think these comments give anyone reassurance.

 

The CCS/CGC team-up was controversial when it started. I think there are glaring issues here and I think this comment is concerning.

 

I did look at the book beforehand and determined it was safe to press. The screening service is mainly used for potential upgrade, and is up to the client to choose. But beyond that, I am always rejecting books for tanning, weak spines, chips hanging, etc. If you saw a dozen threads a month popping up, then you should be concerned.

 

the CCS/CGC merger is not the issue. I actually have had much more time to focus on pressing as a service since I got out of dealing.

 

I'm sorry I don't want to split hairs and I have heard good things about your company. However, how can you say in one post the book was not screened and then in another say you did look at the book? That just doesn't make sense…

 

Just my 2c

 

I look at every book going in, but only at a glance. I keep an eye out for fragile books at that point. The screening service people pay for involves an analysis that includes upgrade potential, resto check and safety among other things. Screening is an added layer of identifying fragile books, so if you are in doubt when submitting, just have it screened to be sure.

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I think it's the difference of 'screening' to determine upgrade potential versus 'screening' to determine whether or not the book is going to fall apart.

 

Then again... :shrug:

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Ive used Matt in the past and have only had exceptional work done!

I have no dog in the fight, just trying to understand the process.

 

My question is did the book go through as a "Walk through tier" press and "screening fees" were waved, and the book screened?

 

I would assume being more then $3000 FMV it would have been a walk through and screened for free.

 

So did the book get screened and deemed OK to press and was so pressed?

 

Is there a before and after press analysis performed or quality control procedure when pressing a walk through tiered (or expensive high end) comic?

 

Does the presser check the work he has performed by opening it to see at least if the two major damages that could occur besides spine splits IMHO (detached cover or detached CF) might have occurred?

 

If damage would have occurred would it have been noted by the presser at some point in the pressing or shipping process so a customer could receive some kind of notification on how to proceed?

 

 

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Pressing is a gamble and can cause the grade to drop due to damage. It's a possibility. The OP should have known this and paid for the pre-screening for extra assurance. The business is quite clear about this. I think it's unfortunate, but ultimately this was the OP's fault.

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Hi All. This book was submitted through CCS. I called Dave, left a voicemail, and also emailed him as of Thursday, so I'm not sure why he made this post only two days ago. The book was not screened before pressing. It was also not previously CGC graded, so there was no definitive way to tell when or how the staples popped. I do check all books before they leave here, but at that point, I would not be able to tell how the cover came loose.

 

The book has a good bit of damage besides the detached staples, so I'm not really sure what effect this had on the grade.

 

This is a good time to reiterate, please PLEASE be cautious about submitting tanned or fragile books, especially if they have weak spines. If you have any doubt, utilize the screening service. Otherwise, it's going to get pressed. There are many times I will reject books during the process, but only if I catch them. And even then there are books that split or pop without warning (like those '60s DC books that have notorious staple pops for no reason).

 

Matt

 

No dog in this fight, but the bolded part seems concerning to me… I would think it would be natural to look at a major key like this and for you to be aware of it. I don't know what sort of volume you are doing, but this sends up all sorts of red flags in my mind. I also don't think these comments give anyone reassurance.

 

The CCS/CGC team-up was controversial when it started. I think there are glaring issues here and I think this comment is concerning.

 

I did look at the book beforehand and determined it was safe to press. The screening service is mainly used for potential upgrade, and is up to the client to choose. But beyond that, I am always rejecting books for tanning, weak spines, chips hanging, etc. If you saw a dozen threads a month popping up, then you should be concerned.

the CCS/CGC merger is not the issue. I actually have had much more time to focus on pressing as a service since I got out of dealing.

 

just an FYI this happened to me about a month ago....

 

http://boards.collectors-society.com/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=7714257&fpart=1

 

I understand you may get a lot of books but to many of us they are very important and not just a number on the wall.

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The fee is waived if using CCS (which I wasn't aware of). Again, I am just throwing this out if the presser (whoever it was) had a similar service or disclaimer which puts the burden on the submitter to ensure the book is a good candidate.

 

 

Store credit is nice but it really doesn't 'compensate' the submitter.

 

Bob, my post was only wondering if the presser does screen prior to pressing or has something similar to CCS where the burden for good pressing candidates is on the submitter.

 

Looking back at CCS services, I note that the max value for QuickPress is $200 so this wasn't even an option if that was the service used. My error for throwing this out there.

 

 

Yeah, I can almost guarantee this wasn't a CCS press job. Although I do press some of my own stuff I've used Matt on a couple higher value books that I felt needed his expertise. The submitter would have gotten a call.

 

:/

 

He did say almost

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Ive read enough to realize if I have a low grade high value book. I will either pay for every pre-check on the book I can or use another service.

 

This is such a part of my hobby I want to avoid entirely if I can. It reeks of problems that are murky at best.

 

Edited by Fastballspecial

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The fee is waived if using CCS (which I wasn't aware of). Again, I am just throwing this out if the presser (whoever it was) had a similar service or disclaimer which puts the burden on the submitter to ensure the book is a good candidate.

 

 

Store credit is nice but it really doesn't 'compensate' the submitter.

 

Bob, my post was only wondering if the presser does screen prior to pressing or has something similar to CCS where the burden for good pressing candidates is on the submitter.

 

Looking back at CCS services, I note that the max value for QuickPress is $200 so this wasn't even an option if that was the service used. My error for throwing this out there.

 

 

Yeah, I can almost guarantee this wasn't a CCS press job. Although I do press some of my own stuff I've used Matt on a couple higher value books that I felt needed his expertise. The submitter would have gotten a call.

 

:/

 

He did say almost

 

:eek:

 

I don't think the question is whether or not Matt knows how to work the press. I'm sure there are plenty of guys here that would vouch for that. Most upgrades you won't hear about. The client is too busy counting their money or admiring their favorite books in higher grade.

 

I did say in an even earlier post that I learned the hard way about pressing books with spine splits. More often than not, it doesn't end well. That said, I have total sympathy for the OP. To have this happen on a gem like an AF 15 has to be painful and he seems like a real good guy. I hope he makes his money back double on the next one and doesn't give up on the hobby.

 

In conclusion, even Babe Ruth would strike out, Michael Jordan missed jumpers, Tiger Woods neglected hookers; etc. I'm sure Matt himself would tell you this wasn't his best work. If there wasn't an element of risk and every book came back a 9.6-9.8, our scarcest collectibles would not command the premiums they do in the marketplace today. To put it bluntly, there is no such thing as a sure thing and there is no upside without risk (except one year cd's at .4% and even then only up to $250k).

 

And, yes, I do feel like a schmuck as well.

 

 

 

 

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-Lao Tzu

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