Centaur Comics
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'Centaur Comics" sort of have their own little niche. There is some sort of mystical allure to them. Tough to get, this scarcity holds back, in my view, demand. Centaurs actually started in March 1938. For the longest time other books were called Centaurs altho published by Chesler (Star Comics, Star Ranger Comics) or by Cook/Mahon or Ultem (Comic Magazine/Funny Pages, Dectective Picture Stories, Funny Picture Stories, Western Picture Stories).

 

The pre-Centaurs were as ground breaking - if not more so- than pre-Superman DCs. The hardcore Centaur titles are notable for the work of the Jacquet Funnies Inc artists- Burgos, Everett, Gustavson, Thompson, etc- who would produce all the early Timely work. I will start a thread of these incredible books....I apologize if this has been done before. But I believe "seeing leads to believing" and a source of knowledge of these foundational titles....Enjoy

 

First up is the Phantom of the Fair by the UNDERRATED GA artist Paul Gustavson

 

719659-1scanamfr2.jpg

 

Gustavson also created this classic Amazing Man cover---does not get much better than this

 

719659-1scanaman22.jpg

719659-1scanaman22.jpg.0a7e44ce1125e1704cdc58a40f4ce16d.jpg

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That 22 is killer!!

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Gustavson also created this classic Amazing Man cover---does not get much better than this

 

719659-1scanaman22.jpg

 

You just gotta love those headbands!

 

893scratchchin-thumb.gifI wonder if Jon has an old article on Centaurs??? popcorn.gif

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'Centaur Comics" sort of have their own little niche. There is some sort of mystical allure to them. Tough to get, this scarcity holds back, in my view, demand. Centaurs actually started in March 1938. For the longest time other books were called Centaurs altho published by Chesler (Star Comics, Star Ranger Comics) or by Cook/Mahon or Ultem (Comic Magazine/Funny Pages, Dectective Picture Stories, Funny Picture Stories, Western Picture Stories).

 

The pre-Centaurs were as ground breaking - if not more so- than pre-Superman DCs. The hardcore Centaur titles are notable for the work of the Jacquet Funnies Inc artists- Burgos, Everett, Gustavson, Thompson, etc- who would produce all the early Timely work. I will start a thread of these incredible books....I apologize if this has been done before. But I believe "seeing leads to believing" and a source of knowledge of these foundational titles....Enjoy

 

First up is the Phantom of the Fair by the UNDERRATED GA artist Paul Gustavson

 

719659-1scanamfr2.jpg

 

One of my favorite covers from the GA era. I have no idea Everett contributed to these books pre-Marvel. 893applaud-thumb.gif

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Wait....we will get to the everett books....but here is a taste.....jon

 

719696-1scanamf5.jpg

 

That cover is amazing! hail.gif

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here's another centaur to revive this thread

 

AmazMysFunnies23.jpg?BCVCqDCBrp8QHjNs

 

Wow! Gorgeous book!

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Nice Everett art from Amazing-Man # 5 (1st). Published about 2 months before Marvel Comics #1 (1939 Timely).

 

amaz-man5.jpg

Edited by aardvark88

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this has one of the coolest Wolverton space patrols. canyon landscapes, flying gas-bag aliens, koosh-ball evil invaders, the works!

 

 

 

 

AmazMysFunnies21.jpg?BCVCqDCBLZDqti.i

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this is the start of Wolverton space patrols, and my favorite story with the mushroom jungles and tentacled spider aliens. wolverton rocks!

 

 

 

 

AmazMysFunnies2_12.jpg?BCVCqDCBYnM2e7iC

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no Wolverton space patrol .... just BILL EVERETT cover and story!

 

this and the other 3 are mile highs -- jbcomicbox occasionally left some nice comics for the rest of us ;-)

 

 

AmazMysFunnies2_3.jpg?BCFVqDCBx7ApGIGR

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cloud9.gif893applaud-thumb.gifcloud9.gifthumbsup2.gif Those books are unbelievable!!! Thanks a lot for posting. Btw., I was just browsing Metropolis earlier today - they have a few Church AMF copies for sale right now.

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Amazing, man!

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Those are some great cover man! I've been an MLJ collector for quite a while now, but as with all collecting I've become a bit bored and jaded as of late. Seeing those Centaur covers has revitalised my interest. Keep em comin'!

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re: Keep em coming -- Would that I could. I will try to add a few more scans to some of the other threads.

re: MLJs -- I don't have much and they are tough books. Start a thread a post a few for us!

re: Jaded -- I just found the forum late last night. quite unfortunate as i stayed up even later! anyway, i was so jazzed looking at all the old posts it was like being back at San Diego Con's past looking at books and swapping stories. Comics are just damn fun! I never get tired of people talking about books they love -- even I ones that I will never collect. Although, now that I think about it, I got into all sorts of weird corners of the comic book world due to people sharing books they liked. Between that and Gerber, my comic book horizon enlarged tremendously.

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re: Metropolis. thanks for the tip. those copies are as nice as the ones i have. great books, really. unfortunately, they cost a wee bit more than when i got mine some years back.

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Recently I posted a question and image. Who was the first 'super-hero' to debut in his own title? The answer was not Capt. America but Amazing Man as produced by Centaur Publications.

 

Presented after some scans is a brief history of A-Man (as known to his friends) and some background on Centaur and Funnies Inc.

 

Who was Amazing-Man? As you will see that is a "Great Question"

 

720257-1scanaman5.jpg

 

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AMAZING-MAN.......

To battle evil that is The Great Question

 

In the wake of Superman, men of special abilities were churned out by the comicbook publishers that sprang up in 1939 and 1940. Although DC was able to squelch the first pretender to Superman (“Wonderman” as produced by Fox Publications), it was unable to stem the inevitable tide of costume crime-fighters that followed. One of the earliest entries into the super-person sweepstakes was “Amazing-Man”, who first appeared in September 1939 in Amazing-Man Comics produced by Centaur Publications. “Amazing-Man” has the distinction of being the first “super-hero” to debut in his own title. (The character also has the distinction of being the first/one of the first comic characters to be announced in an amateur fan magazine as reported in a fanzine overview by John Giunta in Amazing Mystery Funnies 2/11, December 1939!)

Amazing-Man finds his origin in Tibet. (East Asia was a fairly popular breeding ground for super-heroes. This area was the site of the origins for characters such as “Wonderman” in Wonder Comics, “The Flame” in Wonderworld Comics, “The Black Condor” in Crack Comics, “The Human Meteor” in Champion Comics, etc.) An American orphan, Aman was raised and trained by the Council of Seven for twenty-five years. Each member did his part to develop the child to have all the characteristics of a man who would be imbued with the traits of strength, knowledge and courage. As the first story opens, Aman sits chained before the Council waiting for his final tests before setting forth into the outside world. Six of the Council have endowed him with the benefits of kindness, tolerance and bravery, but a seventh, “The Great Question”, has plans of “dire evil for the perfect boy...”

To prove his status as “an amazing specimen of ultra-manhood”, he must pass four tests. The first test is one of strength, wherein he bests an elephant in a pulling contest. The second test (depicted on the cover) has him chained and shackled with a cobra released. Just as the cobra strikes, with incredible speed and agility, Aman seizes the snake in his mouth. The third test is one to test his ability to withstand pain as he receives several knives thrown into his body. The fourth test is one of intelligence in which he demonstrates his ability to speak all civilized languages. He passes all tests.

His friend Nika has been working on an invisibility potion that has certain problems. He injects it into Aman and tells him he can will himself to disappear and, in his absence, will appear a thick green mist. Nika gives him a vial of the formula which must be taken once every week. Aman takes the customary good guy pledge to “always do good and never maliciously harm a brother human without just cause”.

With that he leaves for America. However, as he leaves, The Great Question, mulls over his own private plans and plots to use his telepathic influence to have Aman do as he commands. The vast majority of the stories center about the conflict between these two individuals.

Amazing-Man had neighboring features drawn by notable artists: “The Iron Skull” by Carl Burgos (his first android creation which was to be followed by additional android creations of “The Human Torch” for Marvel Comics and “The White Streak” for Target Comics), “Catman” by Tarpe Mills (who would render “Miss Fury” for Timely), features by Paul Gustavson (who would contribute “The Angel” for the first issue of Marvel Comics) and the wonderful “Frank Hardy” fantasy-adventure feature by Frank Thomas. Additionally, John Kolb contributed “Minimidget”, the first diminutive hero, who would soon be followed by Eisner’s and Fine’s “Dollman” in the December 1939 issue of Feature Comics. Latter issues of Amazing-Man featured the unique talents of Basil Wolverton in “Meteor Martin”- a variation of his classic “Spacehawk” character.

“Amazing-Man” was created by Bill Everett and was Centaur’s principal character in the super-hero sweepstakes. Although not the first published work by Bill Everett (that had occurred earlier in Centaur’s adventure anthology, Amazing Mystery Funnies 1 (cover) and the “Skyrocket Steele” feature in the second issue- September 1938), “Amazing-Man” was Everett’s first publicly distributed super-hero, beating by a month his most famous creation, “The Sub-Mariner” for Marvel Comics. (See Matt Nelson’s article in CBM 26 as to the first published appearance of “Sub-Mariner”.) In fact, what makes the early Centaurs so collectible is that the features were drawn by artists who would go on to greater fame with their creations for Timely publications. In “Amazing-Man”, Everett introduced elements that made his characters unique for the golden age- a continuing story line, conflict between two elemental forces (in the case of Amazing-Man, “good” versus the “evil” of The Great Question), and various names for his protagonist- “Amazing-Man”, “The Green Mist” and “Aman”.

William Blake Everett was born in 1917 in Newton, Massachusetts. His childhood years were spent working his family’s goldmine claim in the Vulture Mountains in Arizona. From there his family moved to Montana where he learned many of the attributes of being a “cowboy” (elements he obviously utilized as background information in some of his A-man stories and later Target Comics.). Everett was led into cartooning by his father. After his family returned to Massachusetts, and after a short stint in the merchant marine, Everett attended art school for a brief period of time. He joined the art staff of the Boston Herald, but soon moved to New York where eventually he became the art editor for Radio News magazine. After some further interim jobs, he joined Centaur Publications and met editor, Lloyd Jacquet. After about a year at Centaur, he joined Jacquet as Jacquet decided to form his own group to produce comicbooks.

According to his bio that appeared in the November 1939 issue of Amazing Mystery Funnies (Centaur profiled many of its artists in the middle issues of this title), Everett was “tall, red headed and handsome” and loved to “strum” his banjo and sing songs of the old west. The bio stated that Everett is “crazy about the sea”. In latter interviews, he acknowledged that he had been fascinated by Admiral Byrd’s expedition to the South Pole. This intense interest in the sea probably explains the reason that he created several characters that focused on the sea or water- “Sub-Mariner” (Marvel Mystery Comics), “The Fin” (Daring Mystery Comics), “Subbie” (Kid Komics), and “Hydroman” (Heroic Comics) and “Namora” which he helped refined/developed. After the golden age, Everett produced some wonderful horror renderings for Atlas in the 1950s. Although he went onto work in the commercial art field for a time, he returned to Marvel Comics to draw “Daredevil” and, once again, drew his most famous creation- “Sub-Mariner”- until his untimely death in 1973.

Centaur began publishing in March 1938. The publisher, Joe Hardie, had taken over a number of comicbook titles that were floundering (such as Funny Pages and Funny Picture Stories from Comic Magazine Co./Ultem Publications and Star Comics and Star Ranger Comics from Harry Chesler). He created a number of new titles with the help of Lloyd Jacquet. Jacquet had been an editor and packager of comics since the beginning- New Fun 1. While an editor for Centaur, in early 1939 Jacquet decided to set up his own company packaging comics to sell to publishers. He set up Funnies, Inc. with John Mahon (former business manager for National Periodicals and former owner of Comic Magazine Co.) and Frank Torpey. Jacquet took with him from Centaur Everett, Burgos, Gustavson and others. Everett became the art director for Funnies, Inc.

Jacquet created one of the first comicbook “shops”. Along with shops such as Iger-Eisner, Jack Binder, Harry Chesler and others, he packaged comicbook material to feed the insatiable hunger of publishers for comicbook material. At Centaur, he had utilized the talents of such soon-to-be luminaries such as Everett, Carl Burgos, Paul Gustavson, Ben Thompson and others. These men formed the nucleus of Jacquet’s Funnies, Inc. which packaged several comicbook titles in the late 1930s and early 1940s. The group that produced the features in Amazing-Man Comics were the same folk that were used to package the early issues of Marvel Mystery Comics. In fact, the premature demise of Centaur in early 1942 can probably be traced to the fact that much of its early talent was absorbed by the needs of larger publishers such as Timely and Quality.

“Amazing-Man” appeared in issues 5 through 26 of his own title (not 27 as stated by the Guide), and all five issues of Stars and Stripes. The first issue was number 5; there were no issues 1- 4. Although it has been suggested that the title continued from Motion Picture Weekly Funnies 1 and the covers numbered 2, 3 and 4, this supposition is probably incorrect. More probable is that Amazing-Man Comics continued from Western Picture Stories 4, one of the four titles produced by the Comic Magazine Co. Centaur clearly had continued each of the three other CMC titles (Comic Magazine/Funny Pages continued as Funny Pages. Funny Picture Stories continued with the same name from its previous company incarnation. Centaur’s Keen Detective Funnies 8 continued from Comic Magazine’s Detective Picture Stories, although issues 6 and 7 probably do not exist). It does not appear to be reasonable that WPS would be the only title that was not “extended” by Centaur. Therefore, it is only logical to conclude that Centaur “extended” the title run of Western Picture Stories with issue number 5 of Amazing-Man Comics.

Everett spun the initial tales through issue 11. Issue 6 reflects an internal struggle as the Great Question trys to bend Amazing-Man to his will by creating a “monster Aman”. He succeeds for a while In fact, “monster” Aman attempts to take over a criminal gang by brutally killing its leader with a pair of scissors. Eventually Aman is able to re-assert control over himself. However, this is the first of many attempts of The Great Question to assert control.

In issue 8 (December 1939) John Aman reads about the German invasion of Poland and decides to journey to Europe to oppose Hitler. With advance dating of books, this story probably appeared on the stands in late October/early November, not long after the September 1, 1939 invasion by Hitler. As such, Everett probably produced the first comicbook story of a super-hero journeying to combat the Nazis.

Engaging in aerial dogfights with the Nazis he is eventually shot down, captured and sent to a concentration camp. Eventually he escapes and joins the French in direct combat with the Germans. He commandeers a plane to bomb Berlin. The story continues in succeeding issues as Everett has Aman raining bombs on the German countryside only to be again captured.

At this juncture he is “ordered” by the Great Question to return to Tibet. Escaping and stealing a plane, Aman commences his round the world odessey when he finally (issue 11) returns to Tibet to be “purified” by fire by the Council of Seven. He is instructed not to meddle in the wars of others but to fight for “peace, justice and right”. At this juncture he is given his chest straps and chest amulet which would serve as his “costume” for the rest of his tales. Additionally, he no longer has to take weekly injections in order to turn into a mist; that power now being in his chest amulet and mind.

With that he returns to America where he rescues a woman, Zona Henderson, from some treasure hunters. With this tale, Everett’s tenure ended. However, the adventures of Amazing-Man - John Aman, special investigator - Aman - The Green Mist - were handled by Al Kirby and Sam Decker. These succeeding adventures involved elaborate machinations of The Great Question to lure Aman to a deathtrap.

In early adventures his strength which was the strength of twenty men (issue 14) dramatically escalates by issue 15 wherein he lifts up a whole submarine. By issue 20 (February 1941) elements of fifth columnists and saboteurs are introduced, who are usually flunkies of The Great Question. The Great Question abandons his hood of earlier stories for a face mask and uniform that is obviously Nazi in design. Amazing-Man foils plot after nefarious plot of Mister Que (as he is now called) who now is working openly with the Nazis. (As he tells Hitler in issue 22, “Call me ‘Mister Que’, it shorter”.. ). However, every time Aman is about to capture him, Mister Que uses his “black magic” to escape. In issue 22 (May 1941), Aman foils a scheme in which Mister Que has frozen the English channel so the Nazi war machine can invade England.

After being a monthly publication since issue 9, issue 22 is a month late and issue 23 does not appear until three months later (August 1941) wherein Amazing-Man obtains the services of a boy companion. (Several stories of Amazing-Man continued in Stars and Stripes which started also in May 1941. Interestingly, the story in the July 1941 issue picks up the story line from Amazing-Man 22. However, the preceding story in the May issue of Stars and Stripes involves a storyline wherein Zona is whisked to Tibet to be given powers to aid Aman in his fights. This storyline is never pursued, apparently due to an editorial decision to give Amazing-Man a boy companion a la “Robin” as opposed to a “woman side-kick”. Coupled with the subsequent bi-monthly scheduling of the title, the addition of a boy companion was an obvious attempt to boost sagging sales.) The boy companion is Tommy, the brother of Zona. Tommy enters Aman’s secret room as Aman contacts Nika in Tibet. Aman is seeking greater powers to battle The Great Que. Nika floods the room with rays to increase his strength. Many of these rays also strike Tommy hiding behind the couch, giving him great power.

Tommy, the “boy wonder” (sound familiar?) outfits himself with a yellow shirt with a large red “T” on it. His presence in the stories is most often superfluous with Tommy usually being more interested where he can obtain his next ice cream soda than aiding Aman. Aman and Tommy battle Nazis until the last issue of January 1942. (Note the “Meteor Martin” story in this issue ends in a cliff-hanger with the tagline to see the conclusion in the next issue of Stars and Stripes, which did not appear). Along with this issue of Amazing-Man, Centaur/Comic Corporation of America ceased to publish. Several inventory features and previously printed features were published shortly later as distributed by Chicago Mail Order Company in Liberty Guards, C-M-O Comics and, a publishing oddity of a comicbook with the Amazing Mystery Funnies logo on the cover to Amazing-Man 23 with the interior of . (This is in addition to the “remainder” reprints distributed by Elliot Publishing Co. in Double Comics.)

“Amazing-Man” remains a short-lived, but significant character of the golden age due to its creator Bill Everett, the host of reknown artists who contributed features to this title and the enterprising Centaur line of comicbooks.

 

 

Jon Berk c. 2005

 

720257-1scanaman15.jpg.83a2811ae2ea21cc1ad66b9ba2a39be2.jpg

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it looks like yahoo briefcase is not a good place for storing pictures that i want to link to, so i'm very interested in suggestions.

 

in the meantime, here are slightly smaller jpgs of the books in my prior posts.

720282-AmazMysFunnies2_3sm.jpg.144141f903dbf1770da4a5afa591b980.jpg

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