A Month in the Life of the Comics
6 6

661 posts in this topic

24,857 posts

The Return of the Month in the Life of Comics!

 

I say thumbsup2.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39,244 posts

Scrooge, you never cease to amaze me with your work. Great job! 893applaud-thumb.gifthumbsup2.gif

 

 

flowerred.gifhi.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14,522 posts

Octopus cover cloud9.gif893applaud-thumb.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,698 posts

I hope this thread will be revived in full. Have just read through many of the older postings and there is some great stuff there. thumbsup2.gif

 

Have you yet completed your quest? if not how many are you still missing?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8,352 posts
# 167

 

Peter Porkchops # 14 - eBay purchase

...

Peter Porkchops Story 2 - "Atta boy, now you're cooking with uranium!" 27_laughing.gif

1627862-PeterPorkchops14Story2s.jpg

 

 

An elegant turn of the phrase. I'll have to look for an excuse to use it!

 

Glad to see my favorite thread back in business. Well done.

I'm also curious how close you are to the full month's set.

 

Jack

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25,382 posts

# 168

 

The New Adventures of Peter Rabbit # 12 - Purchased at Toad Hall in Rockford, IL

 

1628738-PeterRabbit12s.jpg

 

Content:

Cover by Frank Carin

Peter Rabbit in Gay Nineties by Frank Carin 8 pgs

Cicero and Timmy in Cicero's Career by Frank Carin 8 pgs

Sparky Smith by Frank Carin 7 pgs

Peter Rabbit in Bronco Busting by Frank Carin 8 pgs

Inside front cover, inside back cover and back cover - 1 page gag by Frank Carin

 

Also this book should be a nightmare for the folks at the GCD (i.e, it will warrant at least a couple rounds of board votes, a sub-sub-sub-committee from the Tech list on how to handle this new field, a flame-war and no resolution until 2010 but then again ... who knows?) because all pages of the Cicero and Sparky stories are split in half whereby the comic strip occupy the top of the page and the bottom of the page is given over to illustrated recounting of traditional story tales: The Frog Prince 5 pgs, The Honest Prince 5 pgs and Clever Gretel 5 pgs.

 

The book is somewhat of an oddity for two reasons. First, it's the lone funny animal entry for the month from Avon, a company more wont to publish Crime book under its name or its Realistic "imprint". Second, notice how the title is careful to name if the New Adventures of Peter Rabbit. That follows the fact that this series started over from an earlier licensed series started in 1947 that Avon interrupted after they stopped paying royalties two years later. Avon rebooted the title itself and replaced the lead character with a Peter Rabbit of their own, hence the emphasis in the title on the New (and cheaper) Peter Rabbit.

 

1628738-PeterRabbitGallery.JPG

 

The original licensed character traces its origin back to (Info from the Toonopedia) "the stories by Thornton W. Burgess, author of a long and well-loved series read and enjoyed by generations of children, about Jimmy Skunk, Grandfather Frog and other denizens of a mythical animal community called The Green Meadows.

 

Burgess's Peter Rabbit, along with Reddy Fox, Jerry Muskrat and his many other characters, first appeared in stories he wrote about Old Mother West Wind, starting in 1910. Most of these stories (in which West Wind herself soon became a minor character) were published as newspaper columns, syndicated to several papers around America. Many of them were illustrated by Walter Harrison Cady, who as early as the mid-1890s, in such venues as St. Nicholas magazine and Ladies' Home Journal, had been making a name for himself as a funny animal cartoonist.

 

When The New York Herald-Tribune launched a Sunday page based loosely on Burgess's work, Cady (who had dropped his first name from his professional signature) was chosen to write and draw it. Most of the characters were dropped, new ones added, and the star himself considerably altered. Peter Rabbit, by Harrison Cady, began on August 15, 1920.

 

Burgess's Peter Rabbit had been something of a trickster, along the lines of his older relative Br'er and his younger relative Bugs. Cady's was much gentler, and more often a victim than an instigator of mischievous pranks. Both versions were married, but Burgess's had become so only after a long bachelorhood, whereas Cady's achieved that state far enough in the past to have been rendered thoroughly domestic. Burgess's Peter lived in a briar patch, and Cady's in a house. But they at least looked pretty much the same.

 

In the comics, Peter's wife's name was Hepsy. Their two children, of indeterminate age, gender and nomenclature (usually referred to as the kiddies or the babies), addressed them as Popsy and Mumsy. Peter was well meaning but always doing the wrong thing, Hepsy a bit more practical but also no genius, and the babies mischievous but not really bad kids. There was plenty of familial love, but also plenty of conflict among the family members. In short, like the later Berenstain Bears, it was a typical domestic comedy along the lines of Toots & Casper, The Ryatts or FoxTrot, but in funny animal drag and aimed at very young readers.

 

Cady's version of Peter Rabbit continued to be syndicated by The Herald-Tribune for decades, making it one of the more successful of the early funny animal comics, even if it didn't appear in an overwhelming number of papers.

 

Cady retired in 1948 and passed the feature on to Vince Fago, formerly an animator at the Fleischer studio and an editor at Marvel Comics. Fago (not to be confused with his brother Al, creator of Atomic Mouse and Timmy the Timid Ghost) wrote and drew the strip until it folded, in 1957. A year later, he tried it out as a comic book again, at his own Fago Magazine Co., but this time it lasted only one issue."

 

As for Frank Carin (né Carino) who provided the artwork cover-to-cover on this issue, he had a long and prolific career both in animation first and for several decades in comics.

 

After getting his start in animation like many he converted to comic book work circa 1944 by entering the bullpen at Timely at a time the studio saw an "influx of new artists swelling Timely's funny animal line: Joe Beck, Doc Ellison, Harvey Eisenberg, Violet Barclay, Chris Rule, Frank Carin and Milt Stein" (as per Doc V. page about Vince Fago and the Timely Funny Animal Department). During that period, Carin works on such features as Mighty Mouse but also some Teen books such as Georgie and Nellie the Nurse. In the early 1950's after organizing a studio to promotional comics, Carin makes the move to Avon to work on Peter but also on Space Mouse and Merry Mouse among others.

 

During his work as a studio organizer, according to Tony Tallarico, "[Carin] was packaging small sized comic books for Acme Supermarkets. There were 4 titles, I remember them distinctly. One was Doh-Doh the Clown. Another one was Captain Atom that Lou Ravielli did. His brother was a famous sports illustrator. Dave Gantz did and it was a teenage character. The 4th one was the first comic book and the first work really that Jack Davis did was called Lucky Stars. He had just come up from the south. I don't know how he met Frank Carin but that was the very first comic book he did. Before he even worked for EC."

 

The Who's Who credit Carin for cover work for Superior Comics throughout the 50's but I can't confirm / don't know more about that. While Carin seem to disappear in the 60's, he "comes" back doing work for the StanMor and Eerie Mags in 1970-1971 before finding a steady job outlet for the remainder of his career with the Witch Hazel feature for Western Publishing from 1973 to 1982.

 

Gay Nineties Splash -

1628738-PeterRabbit12Story1s.jpg

 

Gay Nineties Page -

1628738-PeterRabbit12Story1Pages.jpg

 

Cicero and Timmy Splash -

1628738-PeterRabbit12Story2s.jpg

 

Sparky Smith Splash - Yes, as on the cover, the reader will never see the face of Cheeta! -

1628738-PeterRabbit12Story3s.jpg

 

Sparky Smith Page -

1628738-PeterRabbit12Story3Pages.jpg

 

Bronco Busting Page -

1628738-PeterRabbit12Story4Pages.jpg

1628738-PeterRabbit12Story4Pages.jpg.e41a61a7a515358cc8b1e0ffb0c0c951.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14,522 posts

Is Toad Hall still open?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16,591 posts

great! I always wondered what the relationship between the 2 peter rabbits was! 893applaud-thumb.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8,352 posts
# 168

 

The New Adventures of Peter Rabbit # 12 - Purchased at Toad Hall in Rockford, IL

....

 

Also this book should be a nightmare for the folks at the GCD (i.e, it will warrant at least a couple rounds of board votes, a sub-sub-sub-committee from the Tech list on how to handle this new field, a flame-war and no resolution until 2010 but then again ... who knows?) because all pages of the Cicero and Sparky stories are split in half whereby the comic strip occupy the top of the page and the bottom of the page is given over to illustrated recounting of traditional story tales: The Frog Prince 5 pgs, The Honest Prince 5 pgs and Clever Gretel 5 pgs....

Cicero and Timmy Splash -

 

 

How strange! I wonder why they did that? Do you suppose that either the comics or the text stories were already prepared for another format and they just pieced around them?

GCD can be excruciating at times, but this would be a good case of asking for forgiveness rather than permission. The 5 features would be listed in the order they first appear in the book. Pages look like a 60:40 split, so the page counts would be Cicero = 0.6 x 8 = 4.8, Frog Prince = 0.4 x 5 = 2.0, and so on. If you had it scanned cover to cover, I'd index it!

 

Another good write-up of a title I'd never looked at.

 

Jack

 

 

1628738-PeterRabbit12Story2s.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24,857 posts
# 168

 

The New Adventures of Peter Rabbit # 12 - Purchased at Toad Hall in Rockford, IL

 

1628738-PeterRabbit12s.jpg

 

 

Very nice Avon cover that I hadn't noticed before. And great info as usual -- glad to see you got groove on! headbang.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4,533 posts

Scrooge, thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,698 posts
Scrooge, thank you.

 

let me chime in here, thanks!v smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2,031 posts

If I were to rank all of the threads on the boards, this one would be #1. #2 would be the Adventure/New Adventure thread (which doesn't get any more action because no one can find the books). #3 would be "Which would you choose?", which I didn't like at first but has grown on me and now is a fun distraction, especially when the pairings are chosen well.

 

At the bottom would be anything started by lastyle7.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25,382 posts

# 169

 

Planet Comics # 66 - eBay purchase

1631935-PlanetComics66s.jpg

 

Content: [Art ID from the GCD]

Cover by Maurice Whitman

Mars, God of War in Invaders of Venus by Joe Doolin 10 pgs

Gale Allen and the Girl Squadron by Saul Rosen 6 pgs

The Lost World by Rudy Palais 8 pgs

Flint Baker in The Plague of Locust-Men by Art Saaf 8 pgs

 

Ahhh Planet comics. What a title, what history and what to say. There is so much ground to cover on this series and deservedly so -

1631935-PlanetComicsGallery.jpg

 

First, I would like to point out that all the stories in this issue are actually reprints from issue # 21 from November 1942. Note that the Keltner index states that the Lost World is not a reprint but the GCD states that it is and it is since this is the first Lost World story, a strip that did start in issue # 21. If one needed any proof, on the last page, there is a mention of the War effort which is quite out of place in a 1952 book -

1631935-PLanetComics66Planet21.jpg

 

In order to get an overview of the series itself, I turn to the Wikipedia (with distrust) for once -

 

"Planet Comics was a science fiction comic-book title produced by Fiction House and issued from Jan. 1940 (issue 1) to 1953 (issue 73). Like many of Fiction House's early comics titles, Planet Comics was a spinoff of a pulp magazine, in this case Planet Stories, which featured space operatic tales of muscular, heroic space adventurers who were quick with their ray pistols and always running into gorgeous females who needed rescue from bug-eyed space aliens or fiendish interstellar bad guys.

 

As a comic book, Planet Comics was the foremost purveyor of good girl art in the comics, and is considered highly collectible by modern fans of comics' Golden Age. Each page of each story featured at least one large image of a very lovely female, attired in very little in the way of costume, and in particular displaying long, bare legs.

 

However, a number of the series developed by Planet Comics upped the ante by providing female heroines who handily defeated the space aliens and interplanetary bad guys, while needing no or little assistance from males. Cynics might have noted that this proto-feminist strategy in effect simply multipled the number of lovely girls shown per panel, and insured that each and every panel featured at least one smashing spacegirl. Fiction House also employed a number of female artists to work on such tales, particularly Lily Renée, Marcia Snyder, Ruth Atkinson and Fran Hopper, whose art for "Mysta of the Moon" was often stunning.

 

Many well-known artists worked on Planet Comics stories over its 13-year history, including Murphy Anderson, Matt Baker, Nick Cardy, Joe Doolin, Graham Ingels, George Evans, John Cullen Murphy, George Tuska and Maurice Whitman."

 

Now the argument presented above is not new but a little more insight should be added. The first 12 issues of the title were in fact quite devoid of the egregious GGA for which the title later became known. Those first issues saw a total of 18 different features as the editors were trying to define the Planet "formula". As a result, the title ended with some short-live strips (now largely forgotten) featuring such strange protagonists as The Red Comet, a super-hero-like character who could shrink or grow large at will, Fero, Interplanetary Detective (# 5 - 8), a "ghost" detective, Crash Parker and His Zoom Sled ( # 6 - 16), think young Anakin in the desert race, Don Granval (# 6 - 11), leading adventures in a sub-atomic world, and Cosmo Corrigan (# 9 -11), a hell-raising pilot on Pluto. All these strips may have had the occasional bikini-clad heroine or damsel in distress but they were ancillary to the adventure.

 

On the other hand, most of the long-running features did prominently feature the female form. An inventory list runs as: Auro, Lord of Jupiter, think Tarzan meets John Carter, Futura, a regular earth-woman secretary abducted to another world where she's fighting tyranny (I kid you not), Reef Ryan, average adventurer who later buddied up with Flint Baker as the Space Rangers, Spurt Hammond, a knock-off Flash Gordon-type, Star Pirate, a.k.a. Robin Hood in Space, Crash Parker, Captain Nelson Cole and Buzz Crandall. Whew. It goes to show that the title ran 13 years and 73 issues! Who knew our solar system would be that busy ...

 

Now, I am standing on the shoulders of some great material covering Planet comics, from "Me To Your Leader Take" by Richard Ellington in All in Color for a Dime to Lou Mougin 's "Weird Adventures on Other Worlds, Planet Comics: The Universe of the Future" in CBM 60. There is also an article about Fiction House pulps in CBM 57. For more info on the relationship between the Eisner / Iger shop with Fiction House for those early issues, please check out Alter Ego # 21 that reprints Jay Disbrow's "The Iger Comics Kingdom".

 

I'll turn the attention to each feature in order -

 

Mars, God of War in Invaders of Venus by Joe Doolin -

 

Thought to be the second-best strip that ran in Planet Comics, the premise is similar to the better known Deadman character. Mars, THE God of War spends his time in the series taking over the body of evil characters in order to wreak havoc and take control of entire civilization as in this episode whereby Mars fostered mutiny of the ship's crew. Therefore, the strip was centered on a villain (one of a few of which the Claw is the prominent example) and the cast of character changing every issue ... until Mars met his match in issue # 35 where Mysta of the Moon takes Mars down. Mars only makes a repeat appearance in # 36 and then goes unaccounted for and Mysta takes over his spot. Quite an unusual editorial decision on how to introduce a new feature by phasing out another one.

 

As for Joe Doolin, alas, little is known. His comic output was exclusively for Fiction House spanning from 1940 to 1949. Doolin was born in 1902 and started his career in the pulps, drawing interior illos for such mags as the early Weird Tales then Air War and Thrilling Adventures and eventually settled in the Fiction House line of Strange Stories and Planet Stories. It's no surprise he jumped to the comic line.

 

Here's a Doolin Weird Tales cover from December 1926 -

1631935-PlanetComics66DoolinWeirdTalesDec1926.jpg

 

Mars, God of War Splash -

1631935-PlanetComics66Story1s.jpg

 

Mars, God of War Page -

1631935-PlanetComics66Story1Pages.jpg

 

Gale Allen and the Girl Squadron by Saul Rosen -

 

At this point, we've got to be honest and to realize that there was intent in the creation of a strip with a female lead with an entire squadron of scantily clad fighters. Gale Allen's original run of stories cover issue 4 to 42 when she was bumped off by Futura. Not much more to be said as the adventures were rather plain vanilla: a menace is identified, the girls are called to the rescue, they almost are defeated but always pull through.

 

As for Saul Rosen, he's another lost soul of the early days. Rosen apparently started in comics at the Chesler studio before jumped to Iger's outfit for 10 years (1940 - 1949) with his output primarily for Fiction House though some of his work was published by Chesler and Holyoke (1941 - 1942).

 

Gale Allen and the Girl Squadron Splash -

1631935-PlanetComics66Story2s.jpg

 

Gale Allen and the Girl Squadron Page -

1631935-PlanetComics66Story2Pages.jpg

 

The Lost World by Rudy Palais -

 

As mentioned above, the story reprinted here is the first ever Lost World episode, the series deemed the best in the entire Planet run. In it, we meet Hunt Bowman, a lone man facing the ruins of Chicago some time in the 33rd Century, lamenting the fact that he has seen no soul since his brother's dead three years ago. All of a sudden, a spaceship full of Voltamen whirls in along with a Lyssa, Queen of the Lost World, whose people are descendants of early space voyagers from Earth!" Ensues a quick romance and Hunt Bowman spends the rest of the strip help fight the Voltas on the Lost World in company of Lyssa. The story gets more complicated later on as the couple recovers 3 more humans, one of which (Bruce) dies and see his brain / mind grafted onto the body of the son of Klang, the Volta king, i.e., the Volta Prince a.k.a. Prince Guth.

 

Note that the Voltas used Latin phrasing in their speech, hence the Me To Your Leader Take article title and other ditties as "The Earthling it is!" No - not fair it is". Yoda, anyone? wink.gif

 

For more info on Rudy Palais, please turn to your copy of Alter Ego # 62 for a lengthy interview with Rudy.

 

The Lost World Splash -

1631935-PlanetComics66Story3s.jpg

 

The Lost World Page -

1631935-PlanetComics66Story3Pages.jpg

 

Flint Baker in The Plague of Locust-Men by Art Saaf -

 

Flint Baker is here in an adventure pre- his teaming up with Reef Ryan as the Space Rangers. Flint Baker's first adventure in space resulted from his desire to finish his father's legacy. When Fletcher Baker died, Flint completed the task of building his dad's rocket ship and took it on its maiden voyage with a crew of 3 ex-con engineers screwy.gif and an unknown stowawy, Mimi Wilson of the New York Globe. Needless to say, Mimi stuck around the strip, providing the cheesecake element seemingly necessary for a feature to survive.

 

For more info about Art Saaf, please visit www.artsaaf.com run by Art's family. Roy Thomas a while ago mentioned to me that Art has advanced stages of Alzheimers frown.gif

 

Flint Baker Splash -

1631935-PlanetComics66Story4s.jpg

 

Flint Baker Page -

1631935-PlanetComics66Story4Pages.jpg

1631935-PlanetComics66Story4s.jpg.4373c2ee6b96048a46edd3d3e31c512b.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25,382 posts

# 170

 

Plastic Man # 34 - eBay Purchase

 

1633926-PlasticMan34s.jpg

 

Content:

Cover by ?

Plastic Man in Smuggler's Heaven by ? 10 pgs

Woozy Winks by ? 4 pgs

Plastic Man by ? 7 pgs

Plastic Man by ? 7 pgs

 

Again, a tough entry to write as so much is known about Jack Cole and Plas. For this entry, outside of online resources, I delved back in my copy of Art Spiegleman and Chip Kidd's "Jack Cole and Plastic Man" book as well as Alter Ego # 25.

 

1633926-PlasticManGallery.jpg

 

Taking a page from the Toonopedia, here's the story of Plas himself: "The "longest arm of the law" started out not an arm of the law at all. Eel O'Brian was part of a criminal gang interrupted in the burglary of a chemical plant. Wounded and covered with arcane substances, he was abandoned by his comrades, but escaped anyway. He quickly discovered the chemicals had transformed him, so that he could stretch his body into any shape. As revenge for their abandonment, he brought his former allies to justice. This brought him such pleasure that he adopted the name Plastic Man, and embarked on a crime-fighting career."

 

Since I already scanned these pages for Jack, here they are from the Plastic Man Archives # 1 -

1633926-Plas-Police1-1.jpg

1633926-Plas-Police1-2.jpg

1633926-Plas-Police1-3.jpg

 

The Toonopedia continues: "That's the story as told by cartoonist Jack Cole (whose earlier creations, such as Midnight and The Comet, made nowhere near as great an impact). It appeared in the first issue (August, 1941) of Police Comics, a monthly anthology published by Quality Comics. A year later, Plas (as the character was addressed) acquired a dumb, venal, but funny sidekick named Woozy Winks. Plas got his own title in 1943.

 

Cole was a comic genius, whose zany design sense was perfectly suited to a character that could assume any shape. He played the series for laughs, and was good at getting them. Plas was cast as the one sane man in a world gone mad — a situation made all the funnier by the fact that he himself, with all his shape-shifting, was the silliest-looking of the lot.

 

Superheroes became sparser toward the late 1940s, but Plas lasted until 1956. That year, the characters and titles of Quality Comics were bought by DC. A few, such as Blackhawk and Robin Hood Tales, continued as DC comics. Plastic Man, who had already lost his berth in Police Comics, was among those dropped. By then, however, Cole had long since departed, and the stories had taken a more serious turn."

 

I think it bears to repeat that it's the breakneck whimsy of Cole's Plastic Man stories that make this work so seminal in the history of US comics. Borrowing from Spiegelman, "Plastic Man had all the crackling intensity of the life force transferred to paper. [...] Most of the plots are as twisted and swervy as Plastic Man himself. They're convincing enough in their mad, moment-to-moment flow, but they're as hard to reconstruct and as elusive as dreams with their vividly improvised incidents." Unfortunately, it must be said that these comments certainly apply to the early episodes of the series and that by 1952, the ebullient frenetic pace has faded even though there remains at times some flashes of the sparkle of the early Plas. Of course, as the demand on Cole's time increased and the output increased, others stepped in to help out in producing Plas's stories. By 1950, Cole actually left the titles completely in the care of others. As talented as André Leblanc, Jack Spranger and certainly Alex Kotzky were, Cole was the essence of the Plas character. The strip could only suffer from his absence. Further proof can be found in the futile later efforts to revive Plas (a sad parallel can be made with the Big Red Cheese revival struggles). Spiegelman continues: "In all Cole's stories, heavily populated by shape-changing villains, mad scientists, and monsters, as well as by more mundane murderers, con menm and saboteurs, he demonstrates the termite go-for-broke quality that made his friend Gill Fox exclaim admiringly, "That's Jack - he'd let his mind go anywhere!" [...] By the late 1940s Cole was a virtuoso, telling stories in a manic language all his own and displaying a vivid vocabulary of exaggerated facial expressions and eloquently distorted body gestures that are shown from a restless succession of angles and drawn in a style that always takes chances but makes the goofy / graceful results look effortless." Such deserved praises!

 

As for the man Cole himself, we all know that he tragically ended his life (for reasons still unknown) at the age of 44 (12/14/1914 - 8/13/1958). Here's a "run-down" of his career as per the Comiclopedia. A brief look should remind us all that Cole was right there at the dawn of the Golden Age and holding his own with all the other greats!

 

Cole at work -

1633926-PlasticMan34JackCole.jpg

 

"Born in Newcastle, Pennsylvania, his only formal training was through a Landon Correspondence Course in Cartooning. He made his professional debut in 1934, when he commenced making illustrations for the American Can Factory and Boy's Life. In 1937, he joined the Harry "A" Chesler Shop, where he made strips such as 'Peewee Throttle', 'Circus', 'King Kole's Court', 'Windy Breeze', 'Officer Clancy' and other humorous back-ups, using the pseudonym Ralph Johns.

 

This is considered Cole's first ever cover. The copy is the Mile High "courtesy" of Metro's site -

1633926-PlasticMan34StarRanger12MH.jpg

 

He became editor of the Lev Gleason Publications group in 1939, and there he wrote and drew comics like 'Daredevil' (with Jack Binder), 'Silver Streak', 'Dickie Dean the Boy Inventor' and 'The Claw' in Silver Streak Comics. He was also present at MLJ with 'The Comet' in Pep Comics.

 

From 1940, he assisted Will Eisner on 'The Spirit'. During this period, he also began a large production for the Quality Comics Group. He created features like 'Wung Cloo' and 'Midnight' (strongly inspired by 'The Spirit') for Smash Comics.

 

Also for Quality, Cole created the legendary 'Plastic Man' for Police Comics in 1941. This humorous superhero feature, in which Cole did lots of graphical and narrative experimentation, got its own comic book in 1943. Cole went on to drawn his cult comic for many years, until he handed it over to other artists around 1950. The comic ran for another six years, still under Cole's name.

 

Classic Splash from Murder, Morphine and Me -

1633926-PlasticMan34Morphine.jpg

 

Cole additionally worked as a freelance cartoonist and illustrator for several magazines, until 1954, when Playboy hired him to draw 'Females by Cole', one of the best cartoon features the magazine ever had. In 1958, Jack Cole was lured back to making comic strips again by the Chicago Sun-Times Syndicate, which commissioned him to do the humorous, slightly autobiographic strip 'Betsy and Me'. It lasted only for a few months - on 13 August 1958, Jack Cole took his own life."

 

Before showing the scans, let's take a trip back to 1941 as recounted by Creig Flessel (in Alter Ego 25): "Well, when I met Jack the first time, Freddie Guardineer called me. Freddie was working for "Busy" Arnold [at Quality Comics Group], and Jack Cole had a job. But, at that time, Jack Cole was living in Huntington, right near me there. So Freddie Guardineer called, all frantic, and said that Busy Arnold said, "Where's the job? Where's the job?"

 

So I went over and Jack Cole was in a rented house, an old rented house. And down in the basement, the water was up to his ankles, leaking from outside, in. And the water - it was like the little boy and the dike. He'd plug up one hole and it would come out of another hole. It was like comedy. And we were talking ... he was talking over his shoulder. And he never worried about deadlines. He was generally on time. But this time, he says, "Oh, tell to go ..." What a memorable way to meet!

 

Plastic Man in Smuggler's Heaven Splash -

1633926-PlasticMan34Story1s.jpg

 

Plastic Man in Smuggler's Heaven Page -

1633926-PlasticMan34Story1Page1s.jpg

 

Plastic Man in Smuggler's Heaven Page - reminds me of an ElastiGirl scene in the Incredibles -

1633926-PlasticMan34Story1Page2s.jpg

 

Woozy Winks Splash -

1633926-PlasticMan34Story2s.jpg

 

Plastic Man Story 2 Splash -

1633926-PlasticMan34Story3s.jpg

 

Plastic Man Story 2 Page -

1633926-PlasticMan34Story3Pages.jpg

 

Plastic Man Story 3 Page -

1633926-PlasticMan34Story4Pages.jpg

1633926-PlasticMan34Story4Pages.jpg.3ed3be52da8957450814eb92dccf1050.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24,857 posts

I used to own a copy of that book -- one of the first few GA books I ever owned.

 

Nice to see it and the other material about Jack Cole! 893applaud-thumb.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
46,124 posts

Forgive me...but "Spurt" Hammond ? Sounds like an adult film actor from the 1970's. Great stuff Scrooge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1,698 posts

I love the summary of planet comics 893applaud-thumb.gif893applaud-thumb.gif

 

If you dont mind me asking.... what was your source for this? As i would love to read up on the various FH titles... cloud9.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
6 6