New podcast/video from Felix Comic Art (UPDATED 1/3/17!)
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I think a lot of us, myself included, were collectors first, humans second. Big ol' hoo-rah to those that have 'converted' to the other way around :)

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Felix,

Another informative and entertaining podcast. I had the pleasure of Glen's presence on my last Collecting Comic Art panel at San Diego. Has it ben 10 years since I last did my panel at SDCC? I had some great panelists but never could get a large crowd for it. Even gave out copies of Playboy containing Glen's article.

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Thanks for that link, Brian.....Can't believe I just went to ebay and bought the magazine. Cool article, and thanks to Felix and Glen for the podcast, much appreciated! It makes the winter go by just a little faster.

Best, David S. Albright

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Thanks for that link, Brian.....Can't believe I just went to ebay and bought the magazine. Cool article, and thanks to Felix and Glen for the podcast, much appreciated! It makes the winter go by just a little faster.

Best, David S. Albright

 

The CGC link doesn't include all the pretty non-comic art pictures.

 

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Thanks for that link, Brian.....Can't believe I just went to ebay and bought the magazine.

 

And I can't believe you were missing that issue from your run! :kidaround:

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These are great Felix. Thanks for doing them. I really enjoyed the Glen Gold video. The insight into the work and why it appealed to Glen was fantastic. Good job Glen. It sure beats my "it's purty" approach when people ask me about the work I collect.

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Thanks, as always, to everyone for their support.

 

These are great Felix. Thanks for doing them. I really enjoyed the Glen Gold video. The insight into the work and why it appealed to Glen was fantastic. Good job Glen. It sure beats my "it's purty" approach when people ask me about the work I collect.

 

I remember when Glen and I talked about some of these pages way back when. It was a huge eye-opener. I learned a lot, and I'm glad if others get something out of this video now, too. Nothing wrong with "it's purty", collectors will always respond to that first...but very special to have a page with a real story behind it, that the reader can dig into. Thanks again to Glen for sharing.

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thanks Felix! tremendous as usual

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Nexus

Thanks for all your efforts. All very enjoyable and a great addition to and innovation within the hobby. Again, my thanks. <3

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May I suggest Glenn Bray for a forthcoming podcast ?

I would love to ear what this guy has to say about collecting comic art...

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Another great episode!

Thanks, guys !

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Another great episode! Very good listening. Still need to watch the youtube video and it sounds like the article is good as well.

 

Anxious to hear who is on deck for the next episode!

 

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It's rumored that the front runners are Mike B, Jim H and Peter K.

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Another great episode and video. Thanks for bringing this to the hobby.

 

a couple of questions (for board discussion or future podcasts)

 

1 - it was eluded to that the time may be near for a million dollar American OA sale.... which are the best candidates?

 

2 - for those collectors that started pre-internet and had to search for comic art the manner that Glenn discussed, which do you prefer - Today where it is easier to track down pieces, there is a community that is easily accessible to discuss art, and easier to get exposed to new art/artists OR do older/more seasoned collectors prefer the times when art was harder to track down, but cheaper and more challenging (with, presumably, a greater thrill of conquest once a page was found)?

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Another great episode and video. Thanks for bringing this to the hobby.

 

 

2 - for those collectors that started pre-internet and had to search for comic art the manner that Glenn discussed, which do you prefer - Today where it is easier to track down pieces, there is a community that is easily accessible to discuss art, and easier to get exposed to new art/artists OR do older/more seasoned collectors prefer the times when art was harder to track down, but cheaper and more challenging (with, presumably, a greater thrill of conquest once a page was found)?

 

Started collecting in 1982. For over ten years I was mostly buying EC art via the Russ Cochran Art Auctions. These were subscriber-based, so the audience would have been much smaller to what you see today with the internet auctions.

 

In addition to the EC stuff (at one time I owned several hundred pages of complete stories and some covers), I had to do the leg-work to track down original art over here in the UK (I was also collecting home-grown art, which could be very difficult to locate when it came to the prime works). Checking out possible leads as a result of research and building friendships along the way (I would travel round the country meeting-up with other collectors).

 

Lots of good memories and I built-up a wonderful collection (most of the good stuff now gone), without having to break the bank doing so..

 

Easier to locate art nowadays, in the age of the internet, but the good stuff is heavily competed for and the guys with the deep-pockets win the prizes.

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Oh, and as an afterthought, internet days (and soaring values) have been good to me when it came to selling-off chunks of my collection to make big lifestyle changes (latest one being that I retired 7 years early from work as a result of my art sales of last year).

 

So, pre-internet days as a collector . . . and internet days as a seller.

 

Both have worked well for me.

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Been collecting since 1986, being on the west coast made it very tough. CBG issues would have already been released back east so alot of the new art would have sold. Plus few artists living out on the west coast pre internet. Always looked forward to Wonder-Con each year, when I would spend the most.

Internet has made it easier to connect with collectors and artists.

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Been collecting since 1987. Back then art was just pilled on the corners of dealers tables. I would go to the old Motor City show back when it was in Dearborn, and it seemed as if 1 out of 5 dealers had at least a few pages out. 10 bucks could land you a starlin page, or a good pollard, or whatever your tastes were.

 

I can remember seeing large art Ditko Spidermans back then for I believe 900 a page, and having my mind blown. I couldnt believe some "sucker" would pay that for a boring fight page with only 3 images of Spiderman swinging.

 

When it came time to buy nicer art, What i remember were the monthly phone/mail auctions near the back of CBG. They would have multiple pieces of art usually. lol I remember I ended up giving up the bid on a neal adams batman cover because it didnt feature a single main Image of batman, and it was already a ripoff at 400 bucks.

 

I think i actually preferred it back then. I loved how special and unique it all was. You only could get art 2-3 times a year, and you had no idea what would be there till you actually showed up.

 

Bringing 200 dollars would guarantee you a nice cover and a handful of great Marvel bronze and early copper fight pages. 200 dollars, while a lot back then, wasnt really make or break money either. For that type of money, you could buy nearly anything you wanted saved for good EC pages or Kirby/Ditko Marvel art.

 

The only thing that hasnt changed really in all that time, is that whatever market price is on something, The Donnellys (known as "San Mateo Comic Art" back then) would be charging 250-300%

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