A Classic 1950's Science Fiction Film and Adamantium
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Like many others, I had always believed that Adamantium was a metal that was created by the guys over at the House of Ideas.

 

But my view changed after I recently saw the 1956 Science Fiction classic, "The Forbidden Planet" starring Leslie Nielson, Walter Pidgeon, a beautiful blond whose name I forgot, and Robbie the Robot. After Nielson's ship lands on a planet that is inhabited by Dr. Morbius and his daughter, he learns about an ancient race of aliens called the Krel. And as indicated by Dr. Morbius, adamantium is a nearly indestructible metal that was developed by the Krel.

 

Coincidence?

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nifty find, always thought it was based off some random alloy or something :P

Edited by bullseye

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Morbius, adamantium... 893scratchchin-thumb.gif

Sounds like Marvel got some good ideas from this classic. tongue.gif

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Like many others, I had always believed that Adamantium was a metal that was created by the guys over at the House of Ideas.

 

But my view changed after I recently saw the 1956 Science Fiction classic, "The Forbidden Planet" starring Leslie Nielson, Walter Pidgeon, a beautiful blond whose name I forgot, and Robbie the Robot. After Nielson's ship lands on a planet that is inhabited by Dr. Morbius and his daughter, he learns about an ancient race of aliens called the Krel. And as indicated by Dr. Morbius, adamantium is a nearly indestructible metal that was developed by the Krel.

 

Coincidence?

 

The literary origins go back far before this, my friend! Try the ancient Greeks, for example. In PROMETHEUS BOUND, Prometheus is punished for giving the gift of fire to man. As a punishment, he is chained to a cliff with adamantium chains while his liver is pecked out each day by a bird.

Joe

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Cool!!

 

I'm curious ComicBookGuy, was the adamantium mentioned in Greek mythology referred to in any way as somewhat indestructible?

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I'm curious ComicBookGuy, was the adamantium mentioned in Greek mythology referred to in any way as somewhat indestructible?

 

Yes, it was described as "unbreakable". tonofbricks.gif

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I thought it was "adamantine" that was referred to in Prometheus. It means "hard" and refers actually to corundum, which is where rubies come from. Corundum is 9 on the MOHS scale of hardness, with only diamond being harder.

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Sweet!! An MOHS reference...I thought I was the only one that remembered that kind of stuff...

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I thought it was "adamantine" that was referred to in Prometheus. It means "hard" and refers actually to corundum, which is where rubies come from. Corundum is 9 on the MOHS scale of hardness, with only diamond being harder.

 

Interesting! We should also remember that what exists in English / American printings varies depending on which translations we read. If you translate it from ancient Greek, you have some choices, each of which will have the same meaning: hard, hard metal, or hard element. Considering the context of the play, that the word is used to describe the chains, adamantine would work, as would adamantium. Adamantine works because it is already a word in our language that can be used to describe physical or mental "hardness." Adamantium gives the word a sound like it's from the periodic chart of elements, even though it doesn't exist. It is a mythological metal that serves a literary purpose, much like Kryptonite.

Joe

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Very good ComicGuy. But the American English translation of the word adamantine while referring to physical and mental hardness, does not in any way refer to a metal. It is clear from this that adamantine refers to adamant.

 

Here's the American Heritage Dictionary's definition of adamantine:1. Made of or resembling adamant. 2. Having the hardness or luster of a diamond. 3. Unyielding or inflexible.

 

Now look at the American Heritage Dictionary's definition of adamant: 1. A legendary stone believed to be impenetrable.2. An extremely hard substance. 3. Unyielding or inflexible.

 

I want to point out that adamantium is defined in the "Forbidden Planet" as a nearly indestructible metal used by the Krel.

 

It is my speculation that if the creators over at the House of Ideas followed the ancient greek version, and if they did read Greek mythology (and I doubt the guys over at the 1970's House of Ideas were well versed in greek mythology-Kirby excluded of course!), Wolverine's adamantium would probably have been made of an impenetrable stone and not of the metal that it is.

 

I will bet that the 1970's generation of comic book artists and writers knew a great deal about 1950's classic science fiction film, and saw alot of it when they were younger.

 

But I nevertheless respect your opinion!

 

Johnl

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As a punishment, he is chained to a cliff with adamantium chains while his liver is pecked out each day by a bird.

 

I hate when that happens.

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from Wikipedia:

 

Adamantium is a fictional metal alloy in a number of fictional settings, notably the Marvel Universe. The name is derived from the word adamant. Created by Dr. Myron McClain, the iron-based alloy is malleable in its molten state, but is virtually indestructible once cooled. Variants include carbonadium, a malleable form used by the villain Omega Red, and Captain America's shield, which is made of an unknown vibranium alloy that was reverse-engineered to create adamantium, and is the only man-made substance known to be more durable in the MU.

 

True adamantium is used as the key component in several characters' equipment, including:

 

Wolverine's claws and skeleton.

Bullseye's spinal column.

Some of Ultron's robotic bodies.

A skeleton and claws that are currently bonded to Sabretooth.

Captain America, using the short-lived identity of "The Captain", used a shield made entirely of adamantium.

Cyber's claws and skin.

Lady Deathstrike's talons and skeleton.

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So great fear of my name 'mongst them was spread,

That they supposed I could rend bars of steel,

And spurn in pieces posts of adamant:

Wherefore a guard of chosen shot I had,

That walked about me every minute-while;

And if I did but stir out of my bed,

Ready they were to shoot me to the heart.

 

Henry VI P1, I, iv.

Shakespeare became a lot cooler as a kid when he mentioned adamantium.

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Shakespeare is very appropriate for this thread. The core of FORBIDDEN PLANET was a transplanting of Shakespeare's THE TEMPEST from the Mediterranean to outer space (very cool!).

 

Monsters from the ID!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!1

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I will also add good old Sigmund Freud to the core of Forbidden Planet-

 

Monsters of the Id!!!

 

Adamantium, invented by the Krel, was the strongest metal in the universe.

Yet, the adamantium steel doors could not keep the horrifying monster out and Robbie was unavailable.

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hey that wiki thing forgot sabretooth, or was his skeleton being reinforced short lived?

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