Dueling Detective 27s this spring
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146 posts in this topic

261 posts
1 hour ago, lou_fine said:

 

 

Definitely an interesting conversation about the potential impact of the Conserved label.  (thumbsu

And in that sense, what are your opinions of the Green Qualified label, especially when it pertains to something like a missing interior piece or a clipped coupon.  Especially since some of these appears to no longer be sitting in the dumpster bin, based upon some of the recent auction results I've seen.  hm

Great question.

I agree that a Green label book with a clipped coupon is a "value opportunity" for a collector to own a nearly-complete, original book at a huge discount. Other types of Green Qualified books are much less desirable, though (again - in my opinion).

That said, I think Green Qualified books are likely to roughly maintain their valuation relative to Unrestored books over time.

Whereas I believe the spread/discount for Conserved books will change over time, relative to Unrestored books.

One additional thought in my mind is how CGC itself considers Conserved books. If you look at the label design itself, it seems intuitive to me that a Conserved book is similar / "of like kind" to an Unrestored book. Sure, it's just a label color, but I believe things like that do impact market psychology.

And especially given the example above, it's hard for me to accept that replacing staples significantly impacts a GA megakey's value (let alone reducing it by 40-50%)

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57 minutes ago, sfcityduck said:

This book should be conserved. There is something wrong with a market that would frown on replacing rusty staples.  To me, replacing rusty staples with rust-free vintage staples should increase the book's value.

Bingo. 

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59 minutes ago, sfcityduck said:

This book should be conserved. There is something wrong with a market that would frown on replacing rusty staples.  To me, replacing rusty staples with rust-free vintage staples should increase the book's value.

If it had come up for sale a year and a half after the 2011 9.0, instead of a year and a half before, I really wonder whether it would have garnered $1.5M.  The 2011 9.0 not only was a better looking book with no rusty staples, it had the cache being the lost Cage copy.  And Hariri would not have bid on the 8.5 after he had the 9.0 (whereas he may have been a bidder on this 8.5 copy).  Anyone know who the seller for the 8.5 is?  I also wonder if the seller was the underbidder on the 2011 9.0.  

It should be conserved  for the sake of the book itself but in terms of resale value the market doesn't always respond to what should or shouldn't be, when it involves "doing something" to a book.   I recently had two keyish books that were restored and sent them to have the resto removed.   In both cases they tore away the color touched pieces, making the book undoubtedly appear worse than before they were color touched.   Both dropped by a couple grades.  One sold for twice what it cost as a "restored" book and the other for about 30% less than I paid ten years ago, because, although the restoration was removed, it got a "conserved" label for cleaned staples (because, of course, you can't unclean a staple).  So instead of a high grade restored book or an unrestored  lower grade book it ended up a "conserved" lower grade book which sold for essentially the same discount over grade as if it were heavily restored.  Neither situation makes a ton of sense, but both are examples of what happens when emotions about "doing stuff" get factored in,.

Edited by bluechip

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9 minutes ago, bluechip said:

It should be conserved  for the sake of the book itself but in terms of resale value the market doesn't always respond to what should or shouldn't be, when it involves "doing something" to a book.   I recently had two keyish books that were restored and sent them to have the resto removed.   In both cases they tore away the color touched pieces, making the book undoubtedly appear worse than before they were color touched.   Both dropped by a couple grades.  One sold for twice what it cost as a "restored" book and the other for about 30% less than I paid ten years ago, because, although the restoration was removed, it got a "conserved" label for cleaned staples (because, of course, you can't unclean a staple).  So instead of a high grade restored book or an unrestored  lower grade book it ended up a "conserved" lower grade book which sold for essentially the same discount over grade as if it were heavily restored.  Neither situation makes a ton of sense, but both are examples of what happens when emotions about "doing stuff" get factored in,.

To me,  an unrestored lower grade book and a Conserved lower grade book have essentially the same "personal value" (as a long term owner). 

Actually assuming I have to own the book forever - I would probably prefer a Conserved book without the risk of rusting staples, to an Unrestored book with staples having even the slightest amount of rust.

That said, I get what you're saying. If you plan to resell the book you have to factor in the "market's opinion". Remember the market's opinion does change over time.

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On 3/15/2018 at 4:01 PM, Sqeggs said:

It has a really funky closing with the clock apparently resetting for an additional three hours if a bid is receive in the last three hours.

I won several things, but nothing too exciting.  For anyone not familiar with them, try to get a hold of their catalog; it's a hoot with all the oddball stuff they list.

 Their catalogs are amazing. I love reading through them. It must take a ton of effort to put together each of those.

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On 1/29/2018 at 11:58 AM, rob_react said:

The Rockford copy is a million dollar book now, I think.  It previously sold for $115,000 ^^

I know some of the history on that Rockford Detective 27.  I read it / flipped through the pages prior to it being sold.  I would swear to you all it had never been opened before or it had been decades since it was opened.  Back half of the book had that "crack" to them upon opening the book.  That was probably 2003 when I read it.  Most expensive book I've ever held with my bare hands.  Friend of mine named Brad here in the Columbus area was the owner - he sold it to Met I believe.

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