Cover Veins/Printer's Crease/Production Wrinkle - Show Me!
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I submitted both comics back in 2004 & 2014 (not pressed).

With CGC Sorcery (CCS), can they remove the cover veins/printer's crease/production wrinkle?

Show me yours! :cry:

x100-65.thumb.jpg.9ca468491bec879488eae5c48e6fc52a.jpgUntitled-75.thumb.jpg.d205c71a58bd102342bc1611c50662d1.jpg

   

Edited by Chaos_in_Canada

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Good question. I do have what I hope is some helpful input. To be honest, printing creases like the ones on the book you've shown are usually not downgraded too severely by CGC, at least not in my experience. Personally, I like the book just the way it is, even with the printing creases. But if you really can't live with it, you could always send it to CCS for an evaluation... 

Edited by The Lions Den

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Yes, you *can* remove them, and NO, you would never want to. You can do considerable damage to the book trying to remove a printer's crease, especially if the crease is under a printed area. 

Frankly, I don't think CGC should be counting off for printer's creases at all, but I'm not the one making that decision.

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Posted (edited)
On ‎2‎/‎24‎/‎2019 at 4:08 AM, Chaos_in_Canada said:

I submitted both comics back in 2004 & 2014 (not pressed).

With CGC Sorcery (CCS), can they remove the cover veins/printer's crease/production wrinkle?

Show me yours! :cry:

x100-65.thumb.jpg.9ca468491bec879488eae5c48e6fc52a.jpgUntitled-75.thumb.jpg.d205c71a58bd102342bc1611c50662d1.jpg

   

Technically, that didn't occur in the printing, and it's not a crease, vein, or anything wrinkle related. It's a pleat. During the actual production of the paper, prior to arriving at the printer, was manufactured with that imperfection. Now, because the paper is actually gathered, that is, like a pleat, folded back tightly upon itself, when the ink was applied a tiny potion of that ink that not transfer to the part of that pleat that is not exposed to the surface! If and when that pleat is somehow unfolded and flattened out, the extra surface area will also augment the overall size of the surrounding area possibly causing dissymmetry (maybe a wave) elsewhere! Also, now, the area that was folded under that pleat will be devoid of ink, the original white of the paper showing, giving the appearance of a flaked crease!  Most back cover areas are white, like where the pleat is on the back of this issue, but when pleated in an inked area, the same will hold true of the back cover as on the front. Think of that like ifyou were to make a series of very tight folds on a piece of paper and then spray painted it, later flattening it out as best as you could. You'd have a series of dissimilarly sized stripes, each band alternating the original color of the paper with the color you sprayed on.

Edited by James J Johnson

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Posted (edited)
On 3/2/2019 at 6:50 PM, James J Johnson said:

Technically, that didn't occur in the printing, and it's not a crease, vein, or anything wrinkle related. It's a pleat. During the actual production of the paper, prior to arriving at the printer, was manufactured with that imperfection. Now, because the paper is actually gathered, that is, like a pleat, folded back tightly upon itself, when the ink was applied a tiny potion of that ink that not transfer to the part of that pleat that is not exposed to the surface! If and when that pleat is somehow unfolded and flattened out, the extra surface area will also augment the overall size of the surrounding area possibly causing dissymmetry (maybe a wave) elsewhere! Also, now, the area that was folded under that pleat will be devoid of ink, the original white of the paper showing, giving the appearance of a flaked crease!  Most back cover areas are white, like where the pleat is on the back of this issue, but when pleated in an inked area, the same will hold true of the back cover as on the front. Think of that like ifyou were to make a series of very tight folds on a piece of paper and then spray painted it, later flattening it out as best as you could. You'd have a series of dissimilarly sized stripes, each band alternating the original color of the paper with the color you sprayed on.

Great analysis.

Both XM100s are high grade, I guess 9.9 is out of the question! :grin:

Edited by Chaos_in_Canada

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On ‎3‎/‎4‎/‎2019 at 6:07 AM, Chaos_in_Canada said:

Not mine...from eBay 

 

 

Untitled59.jpg

9.9 might be out of the question. Not 100% sure, but being a flaw of the actual manufacture of the paper and not due to wear or printing considerations, the flaw actually preceding the printing facility, as seen here, 9.8 is not out of reach for a book with this material defect.

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