Thoughts on framing art next to final production
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Howdy!

I bought my first original art recently and wanted to get some thoughts from those more experienced than I on how to frame it.

My idea was to frame the art alongside the cover of the issue it's from and the pages it is of in their final form. I'm discussing with a framer this coming weekend, but my thought would be to frame two whole comics with one closed to the cover and the other open to the 2-page splash I own.

Is there any reason I should not frame the art this way? As someone new to this part of the hobby, this seems like a great way to document the history of the piece. That said, I don't see many people frame their art this way, so I'm assuming there are a good number of reasons not to.

As I'm sure some will ask, the art is Cosmic Ghost Rider #5, pages 8-9.

A few notes:

1. The issue isn't worth anything really, so I'm not worried about damaging the comics used in the display.

2. Not too concerned if the only drawback is expensive, but definitely might rethink it if we're talking $400-$500+ expensive.

3. I'm taking it to a local framer who specializes in art and uses solely archival materials. I've also done a good bit of research in terms of materials (all museum/archival grade) and colors to use (black frame, white matte).

 

Thanks in advance!

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Posted (edited)

You should do whatever you want and what will make you happy

Now I’ll tell you why you shouldn’t do it

The art should stand on its own there should be nothing to compete with it visually I ascribe to the philosophy espoused by the artist Jeffrey Jones plain black frame plain white mat

I try and match the art to the background of the page if it’s a little off-white I go off-white if it’s hard white I go hard white

But really you should do what makes you happy

Edited by Bird
Sorry I forgot that you already have seen the black frame. Pat discussion

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, Varanis said:

Howdy!

I bought my first original art recently and wanted to get some thoughts from those more experienced than I on how to frame it.

My idea was to frame the art alongside the cover of the issue it's from and the pages it is of in their final form. I'm discussing with a framer this coming weekend, but my thought would be to frame two whole comics with one closed to the cover and the other open to the 2-page splash I own.

Is there any reason I should not frame the art this way? As someone new to this part of the hobby, this seems like a great way to document the history of the piece. That said, I don't see many people frame their art this way, so I'm assuming there are a good number of reasons not to.

As I'm sure some will ask, the art is Cosmic Ghost Rider #5, pages 8-9.

A few notes:

1. The issue isn't worth anything really, so I'm not worried about damaging the comics used in the display.

2. Not too concerned if the only drawback is expensive, but definitely might rethink it if we're talking $400-$500+ expensive.

3. I'm taking it to a local framer who specializes in art and uses solely archival materials. I've also done a good bit of research in terms of materials (all museum/archival grade) and colors to use (black frame, white matte).

 

Thanks in advance!

I don't think there is anything wrong with it except expense and aethetics. I had done that on one piece a long time ago, and I thought the actual printed page distracted from the artwork itself. From what you are describing that will be a fairly large frame and possibly an expensive one. 

By the way, don't get locked into that black frame/white matte scenario which a lot of people use. This is going to be displayed somewhere, so you may want to consider a colored frame to blend the picture to the wall. Usually, I would get a simple frame, but if the piece is lush, it might go better with something more ornate. Take a look at some of the frame jobs pictured on this thread for examples of a lusher look.

 

 

Edited by Rick2you2

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5 minutes ago, Varanis said:

Is there any reason I should not frame the art this way?

IMO: It reduces the piece from art to fanboy kitsch.

My preference is float framing with a neutral wood color that blends back into the wall pushing the art forward.

image.png.788a47de6206ec6db6030aa81c42175b.png

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Just now, vodou said:

IMO: It reduces the piece from art to fanboy kitsch.

My preference is float framing with a neutral wood color that blends back into the wall pushing the art forward.

image.png.788a47de6206ec6db6030aa81c42175b.png

That looks nice. I agree that the goal should be to support the art visually and make it POP! I like adding slightly more mat on the bottom edge to pull the eye downward as it naturally scans the image; I usually add 25% more than the other borders and you cannot tell unless I mention it to you. (So 1 inch all around but 1.25 on the bottom or 2 inches all around but 2.5 on the bottom.)

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3 minutes ago, Bird said:

I like adding slightly more mat on the bottom edge to pull the eye downward as it naturally scans the image; I usually add 25% more than the other borders and you cannot tell unless I mention it to you. (So 1 inch all around but 1.25 on the bottom or 2 inches all around but 2.5 on the bottom.)

If matting, yes; I prefer to float (archival mounting from behind) the art and skip the mat.

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21 minutes ago, vodou said:

fanboy kitsch

Not gonna lie, I'm a bit of a fanboy.

I figured it may be a little garish for most. Your example is very clean. I like it.

A few more notes/thoughts:

1. I love consistency. I'm going to try to find a framing method I like and use the same method on all my pieces as my collection expands. Wish me luck...haha.

2. Speaking of expanding, I'm planning to build out my CGR collection to have a page from each issue. Framing the covers and final pages felt like a good way to display chronology.

3. Maybe I display the covers/final pages separately? That way I'm not committing to a format I could regret, can still achieve the same effect I'm going for, and I don't sink a bunch of money in a frame job that a future purchaser won't put any value in (if I were to ever sell). I'm well versed in displaying comics/covers. What could be a good way to display specific pages?

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1 hour ago, Varanis said:

Not gonna lie, I'm a bit of a fanboy.

Nothing wrong with that, I think everybody on this board is in one way or another. So go for it if that's your thing.

1 hour ago, Varanis said:

3. ...that a future purchaser won't put any value in (if I were to ever sell).

This is absolutely true and The Thing will be that much heavier to ship too unless you break it down and just send the art out.

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1 hour ago, Varanis said:

Maybe I display the covers/final pages separately? That way I'm not committing to a format I could regret, can still achieve the same effect I'm going for, and I don't sink a bunch of money in a frame job that a future purchaser won't put any value in (if I were to ever sell). 

I can’t speak for others but I personally  would assume any future buyers will put zero value in my framing. I’ve purchased a few pieces that were framed and I usually ask for piece to be removed and shipped by itself, there is less chance of damage and it’s cheaper, and even if I’m planning on framing a piece I usually don’t like the sellers frame. 

 

 

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Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, MIL0S said:

 

I can’t speak for others but I personally  would assume any future buyers will put zero value in my framing. I’ve purchased a few pieces that were framed and I usually ask for piece to be removed and shipped by itself, there is less chance of damage and it’s cheaper, and even if I’m planning on framing a piece I usually don’t like the sellers frame. 

 

 

This!

 

Here is one upstairs in the light

D024mKSX0AEKpNQ.jpg

 

Edited by Bird

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Posted (edited)

+1 on what Milo's said.

Misc. Comments:

Make sure you have the wall space.  The final piece will be larger than you realize.

The frame job may cost more than the art itself.  Lol.

I have a piece I picked up in person so I kept the mat and frame.  I hung it up for awhile but now I just don't have the wall space and I also worry about UV light damaging the art.  It's now covered up and "stored away".  UV protection costs more.

 

https://www.comicartfans.com/gallerypiece.asp?piece=120660

Edited by NelsonAI
Link

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19 hours ago, NelsonAI said:

+1 on what Milo's said.

Misc. Comments:

Make sure you have the wall space.  The final piece will be larger than you realize.

The frame job may cost more than the art itself.  Lol.

I have a piece I picked up in person so I kept the mat and frame.  I hung it up for awhile but now I just don't have the wall space and I also worry about UV light damaging the art.  It's now covered up and "stored away".  UV protection costs more.

 

https://www.comicartfans.com/gallerypiece.asp?piece=120660

Oh lordy. I hope it doesn't cost more than the art. If that holds true often, I either way overpaid for the piece or I'm really underestimating framing costs.

I'm definitely good on wall space!

Great piece! You should find an excuse to display it more often!

Thanks for the comments!

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I did it. Once. And only once.

It is just too large and there is way too much passepartout if you know what I mean.

My recommendation would be to frame the artwork nicely and then get a separate small frame for the comic. 

 

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1 hour ago, wurstisart said:

I did it. Once. And only once.

It is just too large and there is way too much passepartout if you know what I mean.

My recommendation would be to frame the artwork nicely and then get a separate small frame for the comic. 

 

Yup. This will be much cheaper too.

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Waste of perfectly good wall space too.

Better to save the wall space for the next original piece you want to frame. I guarantee there will be another. And another. :)

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, ESeffinga said:

Waste of perfectly good wall space too.

Better to save the wall space for the next original piece you want to frame. I guarantee there will be another. And another. :)

I have no doubt.

Edited by Varanis

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8 minutes ago, Varanis said:

curious how others tend to value newer art as I am very new to this.

Generally speaking, it's a little hard to get a real hold on newer art values until initial demand for the latest "hot book" dies down and then the pieces start appearing on the secondary market in the next 2-4 years -- either privately or at auction.

Privately, the pieces will usually sit for a long time because the seller will not want to part with the piece for less than what they paid -- which was usually priced up from the rep to begin with at "tomorrow's prices".

Auction is where the rubber meets the road on new art... For those sellers that find they must sell for life reasons, the piece gets consigned a year or two later, typically at no reserve. In my opinion, this is where we first get a taste of the actual longevity of a run's art values now that the new car smell is gone.

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24 minutes ago, BCarter27 said:

Generally speaking, it's a little hard to get a real hold on newer art values until initial demand for the latest "hot book" dies down and then the pieces start appearing on the secondary market in the next 2-4 years -- either privately or at auction.

Privately, the pieces will usually sit for a long time because the seller will not want to part with the piece for less than what they paid -- which was usually priced up from the rep to begin with at "tomorrow's prices".

Auction is where the rubber meets the road on new art... For those sellers that find they must sell for life reasons, the piece gets consigned a year or two later, typically at no reserve. In my opinion, this is where we first get a taste of the actual longevity of a run's art values now that the new car smell is gone.

Thanks for the response! I had deleted my question as I realized it was a bit naive and there wasn't a good answer, but you gave a great answer!

I mostly asked because the CGR stuff is priced quite high. For me, that's fine. It's one of my favorite series in a long time and the original pieces are absolutely gorgeous. Whether it's worth what I paid in the future or not, it doesn't really matter since I'm never going to sell it.

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10 hours ago, Varanis said:

..since I'm never going to sell it.

Famous last words ;) but occasionally true too! I've bought back several pieces that I knew were keepers when I bought them, changed my mind at some point, and then regretted letting them go enough that I had to pay up to reacquire them. I was lucky they were put back on the market (and I could still afford them). There are many others...at least fifty? OTOMH, maybe more...that's not the case for and who's the poorer for that? So stick to your guns when tempted unless it's a dire need (much better piece you're moving up to or really need the money for life/health reasons). Otherwise...money comes and goes but seems to come again. The art...not always lol

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On 3/5/2019 at 10:05 PM, Varanis said:

Oh lordy. I hope it doesn't cost more than the art. If that holds true often, I either way overpaid for the piece or I'm really underestimating framing costs.

I'm definitely good on wall space!

Great piece! You should find an excuse to display it more often!

Thanks for the comments!

Unless you DIY, quality framing costs a lot of money. I have a local art gallery that I have gotten quotes from (they will do it 100% right and actually appreciate comic art) and it’s not cheap. Unless you have art that’s more valuable than the frame, it’s not worth going whole hog on archival materials, museum glass etc. 

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