So many artist with short lifespans in the industry. Why?
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Posted (edited)

Just picked up a page of original art from Peter Davids Aquaman run in the 90's, loved that series. Artist did some great work as well, Martin Egeland. He did around the first 30 or so of that run and then, poof! Aside from a few issues here and there just vanished. It's just odd that there are so many people from the 80's and 90's that worked for the big two on runs and then.....nothing. What happens? Do they get burnt out, tired of the pay, find work in design and advertising?

Edited by Blastaar

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Other industries...like storyboarding...pay substantially more. Stephen Platt, for instance, left comics for a decade+ to go work in the film industry.

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11 hours ago, RockMyAmadeus said:

Other industries...like storyboarding...pay substantially more. Stephen Platt, for instance, left comics for a decade+ to go work in the film industry.

Dave Stevens did a lot of story boarding too! I believe he worked on one of the Indiana Jones films.  

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11 hours ago, Blastaar said:

Just picked up a page of original art from Peter Davids Aquaman run in the 90's, loved that series. Artist did some great work as well, Martin Egeland. He did around the first 30 or so of that run and then, poof! Aside from a few issues here and there just vanished. It's just odd that there are so many people from the 80's and 90's that worked for the big two on runs and then.....nothing. What happens? Do they get burnt out, tired of the pay, find work in design and advertising?

More money to be made in the animation and the video game industries.

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Didn't both Neal Adams and Norm Breyfogle go to advertising for a while?

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I would imagine it's like any other high pressure deadline meeting job. It's fun and rewarding for a few years and then it starts to take its toll. The ones that are "built" for it can't imagine doing anything else and flourish leaving a long career. 

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As has been said, aside from a few folks who managed to get in at the right time, create a hot property, or work their way up the ladder, there's really not a lot of money in comics, or any reason to do it other than a passion for it. Most of the pros are skilled in various graphic media, and will make substantially more money in animation/storyboards, video games, etc. Kirby probably made more money in his august years at Ruby-Spears than he did in comics. 

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Also, for the most part, no union, no benefits, no retirement, etc. Lifelong comics employment is a dicey game. 

 

 

Kirby-Kid-600px.jpg

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27 minutes ago, F For Fake said:

Also, for the most part, no union, no benefits, no retirement, etc. Lifelong comics employment is a dicey game. 

 

 

Kirby-Kid-600px.jpg

Is that supposed to be Jack Kirby? It looks like him.

I agree.

Back in the 1930's to even the late 1980's artists stayed forever (with a few exceptions). Beggers couldn't be choosers.

But with the proliferation of the digital age, the ability to live anywhere and to work anywhere artists can be more picky.

Some artists take the work even if they don't love it. They just want to pay the bills much like a journeyman or session musician.

I doubt we'll ever again see artists who spend half a century in comics like we saw from the GA to the MA in the first 50 years of the hobby.

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30 minutes ago, F For Fake said:

Also, for the most part, no union, no benefits, no retirement, etc. Lifelong comics employment is a dicey game. 

 

 

Kirby-Kid-600px.jpg

Exactly why I stopped drawing and gave up trying to turn pro years ago...14 hours hunched over a board and little money...no thanks.  

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Matthew Clark is having health problems and they seem to be the type that many artists encounter...vision problems, diabetes, and heart issues. I saw someone recently on twitter (I think) stating that artists need to take care of their bodies and get out and exercise...I hope that message is heard by the creators making our favorite products so that they can continue to live long and healthy lives.

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3 minutes ago, Bird said:

Matthew Clark is having health problems and they seem to be the type that many artists encounter...vision problems, diabetes, and heart issues. I saw someone recently on twitter (I think) stating that artists need to take care of their bodies and get out and exercise...I hope that message is heard by the creators making our favorite products so that they can continue to live long and healthy lives.

Physical exercise for sedentary workers is a sentiment that's been pushed since I can remember back in the 80's.

 

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Posted (edited)

Ah, the world of art: You should be grateful that we're even looking at your work. You should do it for free or next to free. You should pay for copies of your art (painting, drawing, film, photography, music, whatever) and give it to people for free you should be so honored that we would look at it. Think of it this way, you're getting exposure. What's wrong with you not wanting to share your art with me for free?

People bug and bug and bug to see your art and than expect to see if for free. What happens when you go to 7-11 and want a bottle of water for free?

Edited by NoMan

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1 hour ago, VintageComics said:

Is that supposed to be Jack Kirby? It looks like him.

I agree.

Back in the 1930's to even the late 1980's artists stayed forever (with a few exceptions). Beggers couldn't be choosers.

But with the proliferation of the digital age, the ability to live anywhere and to work anywhere artists can be more picky.

Some artists take the work even if they don't love it. They just want to pay the bills much like a journeyman or session musician.

I doubt we'll ever again see artists who spend half a century in comics like we saw from the GA to the MA in the first 50 years of the hobby.

Yup, that's supposed to be Jack. Evanier wrote a pretty interesting post about the history of that quote from the King.

https://www.newsfromme.com/2017/12/21/quotable-kirby/

 

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Posted (edited)

Frazetta largely left comics, as well; better pay was a big reason.  Glad he did since some of his best work was outside of the medium.

Edited by exitmusicblue

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