Avengers: Endgame SPOILERS
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6 minutes ago, Get Marwood & I said:

 

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Posted (edited)

Does Thanos’ weapon have a backstory? Because the way it performed in the movie implies its got something special going on...?

Edited by Callaway29

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3 hours ago, Callaway29 said:

Meh, plenty of tricks left in the bag. Let’s see a western ghost rider, black knight trilogy set in medieval times, namor’s underwater world, etc...even though cosmic is obviously in our future, there’s some cool genre mashing opportunities I hope they explore to keep things fresh and fend off fatigue...

I like the way you think!  The western ghost rider could be particularly interesting....  

I would also love to see Black Knight in Medieval times rather than Dane Whitman

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9 minutes ago, Callaway29 said:

Does Thanos’ weapon have a backstory? Because the way it performed in the movie implies its got something special going on...?

 

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17 minutes ago, Callaway29 said:

Does Thanos’ weapon have a backstory? Because the way it performed in the movie implies its got something special going on...?

It turns out Infinity War was going to tell that backstory. Yet like the Hulk scene where he was going to shoot out of the Hulkbuster, it got cut.

Avengers Endgame: Thanos' EMOTIONAL backstory CUT from Infinity War - what was it?

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Speaking with Comicbook.com's Brandon Davis, Endgame's co-director Joe Russo explained that yes, they did have a clear idea of Thanos' backstory.

 

“Of course. We did a lot of drafts of Infinity War that involved Thanos’s backstory,” Russo said. “We even had a draft where you saw ten minutes of his backstory."

 

"You saw him as a child, you saw him try to convince his planet that it was doomed and recommend that they randomly kill half the population to save the planet. He gets sent to a prison off-planet and eventually watches the planet destroy itself."

 

"It is a whole other film, but sometimes that’s the value in a story room, of writing that draft in the -script because you go ‘alright, at least I have that in my brain now'."

 

The ten-minute scene was not in Avengers: Infinity War, nor was it in Endgame.

 

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9 hours ago, Bosco685 said:

To me, I think it is just Brie Larson intending to kid around. But being the new kid on the team (but with years of acting strength), her responses were misread by a portion of the audience. 

 

Once they get deeper into the interview, you can see they start to ease into the jokes and details. Including Brie recognizing how the original team established the groundwork new members will build upon. But like the video you posted, better she had responded maybe there should be a scene in a future movie where they fight and determine the stronger of the two. Don't allow for the viewers to assume 'EWWWW, THEY'RE FIGHTING!'

She subscribes to Scientists of America, though.

For whatever reason, that was/is part of her Twitter bio...

She's not good at 'playful banter'. I can't think of another 'newcomer' who's been so off-putting. I would gather that the MCU cast is fairly easy to fit into...

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I am so disappointed in how wrong you are, @Get Marwood & I.

I thought you were the prodigal son of comic book everything. Your review of Endgame has left me scratching my head, wondering, "is anything real?"

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Could a Namor movie be on the cards with what was said in Endgame? Something along the lines of a lot of underwater activity

Or since Namor is owned by Universal, would be difficult to tie him in with MCU 

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4 minutes ago, PunisherPunisherPunisher said:

Could a Namor movie be on the cards with what was said in Endgame? Something along the lines of a lot of underwater activity

Or since Namor is owned by Universal, would be difficult to tie him in with MCU 

Lemuria. Eternals. Namor. Serpent Crown. Roxxon. It's all related.

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5 hours ago, Bosco685 said:

It turns out Infinity War was going to tell that backstory. Yet like the Hulk scene where he was going to shoot out of the Hulkbuster, it got cut.

Avengers Endgame: Thanos' EMOTIONAL backstory CUT from Infinity War - what was it?

 

hmA Thanos trilogy as a Prequel to the Infinity Saga would be a good idea.:cloud9:

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Since they’re going with a multi-verse it seems a good way to introduce Captain Britain as the protector from his lighthouse

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14 hours ago, ianh said:

 it's kinda silly to think Brie Larson is not a good actress. They don't just give oscars away you know for decent performances

 

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7 hours ago, TwoPiece said:

I am so disappointed in how wrong you are, @Get Marwood & I.

I thought you were the prodigal son of comic book everything. Your review of Endgame has left me scratching my head, wondering, "is anything real?"

It's only an opinion TwoPiece, and only a film. I was hoping for a blue 9.4 and got a 5 with a purple label. The world keeps turning though, real or otherwise. 

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On 5/10/2019 at 1:27 AM, zhamlau said:

I keep hearing this be said, but I have to disagree on some level. A-lister I think has nothing really to do with comic book sales or what rights sold first. A list is about who the main stream public knew /felt familiar with. Captain America and Iron-man were characters non-comic book people could identify even back in the 80s and 90s. In fact Cap had a horrible movie made for him i think around the late 80s (using JD Salingers son as the lead if I remember correctly).

Not saying you cant push new characters into the marketing/social media machine and manufacture "buzz" to turn someone into A list, but Cap and Ironman didn't need that. They were A list all the way intrinsically.

 

It's been pointed out before: When Marvel made the rights available for their characters, Spider-man, The Fantastic Four, and the X-Men got snatched up. Iron Man, Captain America and Thor did not. Studios just didn't see them as A-list characters capable of carrying a movie. 

Your right, it had nothing to do with comic book sales - studios see that as meaningless - but it did have to do with merchandising power, which Spider-man is and was the #1 merchandised Superhero in the world. Marvel, after a failed deal with other studios, sold Spidey for $7-10 Million dollars to Sony. Reportedly, Marvel head Ike Purlmutter offered up the entire catalog of Marvel for only $25 Million. 

And on the open market, everyone said no. Because after Spidey, FF and the X-Men, the perception was, the rest of those characters had no juice. They were 'what's left'. B-list or worse. The open market dictated their status. It wasn't what film rights sold FIRST. Their film rights couldn't sell at ALL.

At the time, someone could've bought the film rights to Iron Man, with a minor amount of shrewd negotiation, for as little as $3 Million. And no one did.

It's easy to look at it in hindsight and see it as valuable. At the time, no one was thinking those characters would make a great movie. They were considered B-list.

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54 minutes ago, Batman said:

Shazam! was better.

To be more accurate, Endgame was the cherry on top of 20+ entertaining moneymaking Marvel Studios movies which revolutionized blockbuster moviemaking with its successful extended universe experiment which DC has failed to replicate competently so far and whose Justice League movie crashed and burned so bad that people lost jobs over it.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Chuck Gower said:

It's been pointed out before: When Marvel made the rights available for their characters, Spider-man, The Fantastic Four, and the X-Men got snatched up. Iron Man, Captain America and Thor did not. Studios just didn't see them as A-list characters capable of carrying a movie. 

Your right, it had nothing to do with comic book sales - studios see that as meaningless - but it did have to do with merchandising power, which Spider-man is and was the #1 merchandised Superhero in the world. Marvel, after a failed deal with other studios, sold Spidey for $7-10 Million dollars to Sony. Reportedly, Marvel head Ike Purlmutter offered up the entire catalog of Marvel for only $25 Million. 

And on the open market, everyone said no. Because after Spidey, FF and the X-Men, the perception was, the rest of those characters had no juice. They were 'what's left'. B-list or worse. The open market dictated their status. It wasn't what film rights sold FIRST. Their film rights couldn't sell at ALL.

At the time, someone could've bought the film rights to Iron Man, with a minor amount of shrewd negotiation, for as little as $3 Million. And no one did.

It's easy to look at it in hindsight and see it as valuable. At the time, no one was thinking those characters would make a great movie. They were considered B-list.

If 'snatched up' implies didn't move forward with a final movie, you would be correct. But of course, on-going pre-development went on for years, as you probably read. And Cap was attempted in 3 direct-to-TV movies (1979, 1990).

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On 5/10/2019 at 4:30 AM, Bosco685 said:

It's actually not an accurate statement to say Cap and Iron Man were not A-list characters. They were always some of the front-forward characters used in the 1966 animated cartoons, Marvel marketing and fan collateral, and as leaders of the Avengers recognized extensively by anyone even remotely aware of Marvel Comics.

With early movie rights being sold early, Cap was touched on already. Here's Iron Man's journey.

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In April 1990, Universal Studios bought the rights to develop Iron Man for the big screen, with Stuart Gordon to direct a low-budget film based on the property. By February 1996, 20th Century Fox had acquired the rights from Universal. In January 1997, Nicolas Cage expressed interest in portraying the character, while in September 1998, Tom Cruise expressed interest in producing as well as starring in an Iron Man film. Jeff Vintar and Iron Man co-creator Stan Lee co-wrote a story for Fox, which Vintar adapted into a screenplay. It included a new science-fiction origin for the character, and featured MODOK as the villain. Tom Rothman, President of Production at Fox, credited the screenplay with finally making him understand the character. In May 1999, Jeffrey Caine was hired to rewrite Vintar and Lee's ---script. That October, Quentin Tarantino was approached to write and direct the film. Fox sold the rights to New Line Cinema the following December, reasoning that although the Vintar/Lee ---script was strong, the studio had too many Marvel superheroes in development, and "we can't make them all."

 

By July 2000, the film was being written for New Line by Ted Elliott, Terry Rossio, and Tim McCanlies. McCanlies' ---script used the idea of a Nick Fury cameo to set up his own film. In June 2001, New Line entered talks with Joss Whedon, a fan of the character, to direct, and in December 2002, McCanlies had turned in a completed ---script. In December 2004, the studio attached director Nick Cassavetes to the project for a target 2006 release. Screenplay drafts were written by Alfred Gough, Miles Millar, and David Hayter, and pitted Iron Man against his father Howard Stark, who becomes War Machine. After two years of unsuccessful development, and the deal with Cassavetes falling through, New Line Cinema returned the film rights to Marvel.

 

In November 2005, Marvel Studios worked to start development from scratch, and announced Iron Man as their first independent feature, as the character was their only major one not already depicted in live action.

Like was noted by @zhamlau there already had been a Cap live film. Nic Cage and Tom Cruise were aware and interested in taking on the role of Tony Stark/Iron Man back in the 90's. The same time the Spider-Man and X-Men films were bouncing around in development.

Not to take anything away from Marvel Studios, which did its work to educate the general audience in advance prior to the 2008 film. You learn why Tim Miller is so respected at Marvel prior to Deadpool.

Quote

In order to build awareness for Iron Man from the general public, and put him on the same level of popularity as Spider-Man or Hulk, Marvel conducted focus groups to help remove the general perception that the character was a robot. After the groups proved successful, the information Marvel received helped them formulate an awareness-building plan, which included releasing three animated short films ahead of the film's release. The shorts were called "Iron Man Advertorials", and were produced by Tim Miller and Blur Studio.

Saying Iron Man and Cap were not A-listers when they were always top-of-list for animation and live productions ignores their development history. But making them household names across the globe took some extra work.

It comes down to Disney/MCU breaking the barrier how best to portray Tony Stark/Iron Man. And using Blur Studios to help expand general audience awareness. Big win!

Edited by Bosco685

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