I’m still furious
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My mother has literally smacked the cover of a comic (Submariner, Namor vs. Thing issue) just to get a rise out of me... :O

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Posted (edited)

I was given 50p to buy some comics from the bus station newsstand whenever I'd go with my mother and grandmother to the town food market, which would get me enough at 6p an issue, or 15p for a 100 pager, to look like good enough value for money.

Once I started buying via mail order a few years later and paying higher secondary market prices, I didn't disclose the eye-watering £2 or £3 I was often being charged, and I would've been told to cease and desist very quickly.

Edited by Ken Aldred

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That letter is pretty damn funny. 

Patrick

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My parents were always pretty supportive of my comic collecting.  When I was 18, my dad found out that the (adult) son of one of his friends was looking to sell off his comic books and let me know about it.  We drove an hour to his apartment and I came back with four long boxes full of books for around $300.  Inside there was his run of X-Men, which was complete from 94-210 plus Giant Size X-Men 1 and about half of the issues from 4-93.  There was a lot of other stuff in there as well, but I've wondered for a while what I left behind in the other 8 long boxes.  I picked up the X-Men issues because I'd never read them and it was a good opportunity to jump start my collection.

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4 hours ago, kaculler said:

My parents were always pretty supportive of my comic collecting.  When I was 18, my dad found out that the (adult) son of one of his friends was looking to sell off his comic books and let me know about it.  We drove an hour to his apartment and I came back with four long boxes full of books for around $300.  Inside there was his run of X-Men, which was complete from 94-210 plus Giant Size X-Men 1 and about half of the issues from 4-93.  There was a lot of other stuff in there as well, but I've wondered for a while what I left behind in the other 8 long boxes.  I picked up the X-Men issues because I'd never read them and it was a good opportunity to jump start my collection.

My mother was supportive,  but my father? He was a different story.:shy:

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5 hours ago, oakman29 said:

My mother was supportive,  but my father? He was a different story.:shy:

My parents were both teachers who read a lot so that probably helped.  They also read comics quite a bit when they were kids back in the 1940s/early 1950s.  Unfortunately their comics all got passed on  to relatives after they read them and the only ones that they still had were come of the cereal premiums from that era.

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Funny and sad alike. My mom was very supportive of my comic reading habit. she always said, you were MUCH easier than your brother, if you were crying all I had to do is go to the newsstands and get you a few superboy/batman comics and you would be happy for the next few days

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Short story that I expect no one to read:

I went to a comic shop on Thor'sday before Endgame, because I had time after work, and before I was meeting up with someone. Turns out the shop I went to is a sister store (well, actually, the original) to the one my dad used to take me and my younger brother to when we were in middle school. I knew the name sounded familiar. I asked them if they were national. "No." I definitely heard the name before. Thought maybe I read them here or a local friend may have visited them. I just remembered the name from my 8-14 year old self going with my dad to the other one 50 miles away.

My dad was always supportive of reading comics and watching cartoons, because that's what he did as a kid. My mom was supportive as well, encouraging us to read Garfield and Calvin & Hobbes. I know the 90's are definitely different times to the pre-Modern Ages. It's always good times when your parents let you have fun.

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On 4/28/2019 at 5:53 PM, ivegotneatstuff said:

I’m going through old letters from the 60s 70s and 80s written by my mother to  her mother/my grandmother. Came across this gem. (I was 14 when it was written.)

Now I’m looking for the order form which I probably kept 😂😂😂

I think it was a Mile High order form - prices would have probably evened out by now.

3D04C7DE-CF8F-443C-A636-D1ECFE6DED83.thumb.jpeg.a29f1ac8b852da385a05b689ae5a1c43.jpeg

 

F523DFF5-0080-4F3B-B85F-C9856C409FB3.thumb.jpeg.ad1d9dc92e23f52cb14b7758b5bfc4fc.jpeg

 

 

 

 

Any idea what you tried to order?

Please don't tell me it was 

ASM 129

IH 181 

GSX 1

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Posted (edited)

thanks to hearing all the horror stories that were told by people by the time I started collecting (mid-1970s), I knew all too well about the potential for this (parents throwing out comics/being against collecting in general). So I made sure my folks understood that under no circumstances were they to ever throw my comics out and the reasons why-- mostly that comics can appreciate in value over time. They understood this even though they were not collectors of anything that I ever knew about. I had full control of the money I earned doing paper routes and other jobs. Before that time-- I was given a small allowance which was often tied to a list of house chores to earn the allowance. It was a work ethic that was ingrained in me early-- and that money was mine to do with as I pleased. The money from those paper routes (3) helped me buy comics but also I saved up for a brand new Schwinn 36x36 chrome BMX bike (about $140-150 back then). I also put a bunch of that money in my savings account. When our family faced some tough times in the late 1970s, I had no problem letting my dad borrow that money (about $350 I think) to help pay the bills one month. The late 1970s recession was a tough time for many of us.

I don't understand why any mothers would be so determined or upset about comic books. Perhaps it was a result of the Seduction of the Innocent that hung on. It sucks that it held any collector back or destroyed books as late as the 1970s though.

Edited by 01TheDude

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My mom helped me buy some Spawn comics on eBay back when it was still collectibles-focused and quite small. (Mid-late 90’s) That was cool and I still have them. :headbang:

My Dad didn’t care, as long as I had a job to go to after school...

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On 4/28/2019 at 5:53 PM, ivegotneatstuff said:

I’m going through old letters from the 60s 70s and 80s written by my mother to  her mother/my grandmother. Came across this gem. (I was 14 when it was written.)

Now I’m looking for the order form which I probably kept 😂😂😂

I think it was a Mile High order form - prices would have probably evened out by now.

3D04C7DE-CF8F-443C-A636-D1ECFE6DED83.thumb.jpeg.a29f1ac8b852da385a05b689ae5a1c43.jpeg

 

F523DFF5-0080-4F3B-B85F-C9856C409FB3.thumb.jpeg.ad1d9dc92e23f52cb14b7758b5bfc4fc.jpeg

 

 

 

 

That's great!  At least you didn't get your mouth washed out with soap.

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