Modern Keys...a list?
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 No. 48, Volume 1, 1st print, Marvel Comics (1966)
   
Grade
Notes 2017 Avg   2018 Avg   12Mnth Avg   90Day Avg   Last Sale
 
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( 9.8 )    (4) $24,063    (3) $32,344 arrow_up_green.png    (3) $32,344    -   $31,833  Dec-2018
 
 
 
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( 9.8 )  Pacific Coast  -    -    -    -   $10,158  Jul-2012
 
 
 
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( 9.8 )  Sgnt series/Signed by Stan Lee  (1) $15,535    -    -    -   $15,535  Feb-2017
 
 
 
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( 9.6 )    (9) $7,479    (2) $10,375 arrow_up_green.png    (2) $10,375    -   $11,700  Nov-2018
 
 
 
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A ( 9.6 )  Cover Trimmed  -    -    -    -   $850  Nov-2004
 
 
 
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( 9.6 )  Curator Copy  -    -    -    -   $7,170  May-2013
 
 
 
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( 9.4 )    (4) $3,991    (2) $9,728 arrow_up_green.png    (5) $9,791 arrow_up_green.png    (2) $9,875 arrow_up_green.png   $10,750  May-2019

 

 

No. 49, Volume 1, 1st print, Marvel Comics (1966)
   
Grade
Notes 2017 Avg   2018 Avg   12Mnth Avg   90Day Avg   Last Sale
 
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( 9.8 )    -    -    -    -   $47,600  Nov-2016
 
 
 
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( 9.6 )    -    (1) $13,500    (1) $13,500    -   $13,500  Aug-2018
 
 
 
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( 9.6 )  Pacific Coast  -    -    -    -   $8,963  Jul-2012
 
 
 
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( 9.4 )    (2) $4,500    (1) $5,850 arrow_up_green.png    (1) $5,850    -   $5,850  Aug-2018

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On 5/15/2019 at 1:54 PM, TwoPiece said:

That's not how "keys" work.

Comic book keys are not relative to comic book movies.

This is actually just plain wrong.  You may be right in many cases... a short-term burst in popularity and value may not make something "key", but if a movie or TV show ignites the popularity of a character and it stands the test of time, then certainly it can turn a character's 1st (or most noteworthy) appearance into a "key".

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19 hours ago, Lazyboy said:

So one-shots can't be key? Only a few early ASMs are key because some of the keys are worth more than others? A random Batman appearance in a third-tier title is key?

 

https://www.dictionary.com/browse/key In which definition is value mentioned?

 

OPG-Key.jpg.669740c73d5dbb5d07816f8656e98d73.jpg

As generally irrelevant as it now is, I guess the OPG just forgot to mention value as well.

How so?  He states it right there.  "CONSIDERED ESPECIALLY DESIRABLE BY COLLECTORS"... I can't think of an example in which an "especially desirable" issue isn't worth more than issues that are not "especially desirable".  He didn't forget to state it... he just didn't need to be redundant.

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A "key" example... The Riddler appeared in I believe just 2 golden-age issues.  He was just another of dozens of Batman villains that came and went after just a couple of appearances.  To this day nobody would have ever cared about him.  EXCEPT... he was picked up and used in the "Batman" TV show.  The character became popular.  DC worked him into more and more stories because of this.  One thing leads to another.  I don't think anyone could argue that the first golden-age appearance of The Riddler is not a key.  Thus movies/TV CAN make an issue into a key.

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3 minutes ago, Bookery said:

A "key" example... The Riddler appeared in I believe just 2 golden-age issues.  He was just another of dozens of Batman villains that came and went after just a couple of appearances.  To this day nobody would have ever cared about him.  EXCEPT... he was picked up and used in the "Batman" TV show.  The character became popular.  DC worked him into more and more stories because of this.  One thing leads to another.  I don't think anyone could argue that the first golden-age appearance of The Riddler is not a key.  Thus movies/TV CAN make an issue into a key.

That might be said about Harley Quinn too

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4 minutes ago, Hollywood1892 said:

That might be said about Harley Quinn too

A perfect example.  She was invented by TV.  DC picked up on this and began promoting the character in the comics.  She is now one of the most significant characters in the whole DC universe.  Popularity is one (perhaps the primary) factor in determining a Key issue.  And popularity can be ignited by all sorts of things   It's the reason the 1st appearance of Batman is a Key, and the 1st appearance of Kangaroo Man is not (yes... he's a real character).  In the past comic characters were made popular within the comics... good stories, or great art ignited interest in the character.  The publisher notices this, and begins using the character more and more.  Sometimes this happens quickly... sometimes it takes years.  But other things can spark popularity too.  And TV and movies are part of that... and becoming an ever-more significant factor in modern times.   

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16 minutes ago, Bookery said:

A perfect example.  She was invented by TV.  DC picked up on this and began promoting the character in the comics.  She is now one of the most significant characters in the whole DC universe.  Popularity is one (perhaps the primary) factor in determining a Key issue.  And popularity can be ignited by all sorts of things   It's the reason the 1st appearance of Batman is a Key, and the 1st appearance of Kangaroo Man is not (yes... he's a real character).  In the past comic characters were made popular within the comics... good stories, or great art ignited interest in the character.  The publisher notices this, and begins using the character more and more.  Sometimes this happens quickly... sometimes it takes years.  But other things can spark popularity too.  And TV and movies are part of that... and becoming an ever-more significant factor in modern times.   

Movies are the social media platform for comics and word to spread like wildfire than?

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1 hour ago, Bookery said:

How so?  He states it right there.  "CONSIDERED ESPECIALLY DESIRABLE BY COLLECTORS"... I can't think of an example in which an "especially desirable" issue isn't worth more than issues that are not "especially desirable".  He didn't forget to state it... he just didn't need to be redundant.

The OPG definition says issues that contain especially desirable features, with first appearances and origins given as specific examples, not especially desirable issues.

There's this little thing called supply. It is extremely relevant to prices.

Anyway, the real point is still that keys create value, not the other way around.

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2 hours ago, thunsicker said:

Suspense 3, Fantastic 3, Detective 31, Startling 49.  All are pretty big keys in my book and none are first appearances.

Popular covers are not key. Period.

Valuable? Rare (at least for these examples, relatively)? Popular/Hot?  Yes. Key? No.

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11 hours ago, shadroch said:

If people want Foreskin Man #13 because it's the first appearance of the Shmo, how does that not fit the description you posted. 

Foreskin Man is only up to issue #7.  The Shmo has yet to make an appearance.  Just sayin'

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17 hours ago, Heronext said:

To everyone debating what makes a key, I ask you this: What was the exact month and year that Amazing Fantasy #15 attained “key” status?

Nice one! I have a book about the first con in 1964 and they were talking up that book and it was priced higher, so, 1964?

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I wish I was Harley Quinn, with supple booty, and her big "attitude ".

Just sayin' 

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1 hour ago, NoMan said:

Nice one! I have a book about the first con in 1964 and they were talking up that book and it was priced higher, so, 1964?

I wonder if Spidey 1 was a bigger book back then, it being a first issue. 

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Just now, shadroch said:

I wonder if Spidey 1 was a bigger book back then, it being a first issue. 

I’ll check the old ads in that book when I find the energy to get up. 

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1 hour ago, oakman29 said:

I wish I was Harley Quinn, with supple booty, and her big "attitude ".

Just sayin' 

How come this post doesn't have more likes?

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16 hours ago, Hollywood1892 said:

I think the raccoon is a cool character though the book is valued at the same price as a edge of the spiderverse 002 and look at the age difference. When a book only 4 years old sells for 500 in 9.8 compared to a book 30 years old in 9.8 selling for the same price I think you can decipher major key from minor. Now dont get me wrong I love rocket raccoon.

Price does not determine "key".

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16 hours ago, Bookery said:

This is actually just plain wrong.  You may be right in many cases... a short-term burst in popularity and value may not make something "key", but if a movie or TV show ignites the popularity of a character and it stands the test of time, then certainly it can turn a character's 1st (or most noteworthy) appearance into a "key".

Sorry, but, you're wrong.

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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, shadroch said:

I wonder if Spidey 1 was a bigger book back then, it being a first issue. 

Marc Nadel in an RBCC  #31 ad dated 6/64 has AF 15 at 50 cents. Spiderman #1 is $1.00. This issue of RBCC was sold (?) given out (?) at the 1964 NYCC con. 

A Claude Held ad in same issue of RBCC has AF 15 at $1.50 and ASM 1 at $1.00. 

Edited by NoMan

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2 hours ago, TwoPiece said:

Sorry, but, you're wrong.

You're arguing just to argue because you've ceased to make any sense.  Nobody has a clue as to what you're trying to get at.  Popularity doesn't make a key according to you.  Standing the test of time doesn't make a key according to you.  You've not given a definition of "key" other than some vague comments about 1st appearances... but every character ever created has a 1st app., so without popularity and standing the test of time, what does that mean?  I gave you a perfect example with "The Riddler".  Nobody (rationally) argues his 1st app. isn't key.  And nobody (rationally) argues his popularity and importance in the Batman universe wasn't the result of his introduction into the TV series.  Why is the 1st app. of Spider-Man important?  He wasn't especially innovative (pretty much a re-make of The Fly).  He's important because he became immensely popular.  And it doesn't matter how that popularity came about... within the comic medium itself, from a radio show, a TV program, a movie, or because a famous individual announces it's their favorite and the public suddenly takes notice.

Two things make something "key"... (A) of historical importance because it begins a trend, or makes other events possible; e.g. Famous Funnies #1 is a key because of its historical value, despite it not being especially popular with collectors-- most aren't seeking to own one... same thing can be said for The Yellow Kid.  (B)  A character becomes so popular that they become important to the medium... Batman's popularity is important to the medium, Kangaroo Man's lack of popularity makes him less important.  But if they make a movie of Kangaroo Man, and it's hugely successful AND DC then goes on to make Kangaroo Man an integral part of its universe, and thousands of collectors start trying to find his 1st app., and he remains integral from now on (not just a passing fad) then eventually that 1st app. will be considered a key issue.

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1 minute ago, Bookery said:

You're arguing just to argue because you've ceased to make any sense.  Nobody has a clue as to what you're trying to get at.  Popularity doesn't make a key according to you.  Standing the test of time doesn't make a key according to you.  You've not given a definition of "key" other than some vague comments about 1st appearances... but every character ever created has a 1st app., so without popularity and standing the test of time, what does that mean?  I gave you a perfect example with "The Riddler".  Nobody (rationally) argues his 1st app. isn't key.  And nobody (rationally) argues his popularity and importance in the Batman universe wasn't the result of his introduction into the TV series.  Why is the 1st app. of Spider-Man important?  He wasn't especially innovative (pretty much a re-make of The Fly).  He's important because he became immensely popular.  And it doesn't matter how that popularity came about... within the comic medium itself, from a radio show, a TV program, a movie, or because a famous individual announces it's their favorite and the public suddenly takes notice.

Two things make something "key"... (A) of historical importance because it begins a trend, or makes other events possible; e.g. Famous Funnies #1 is a key because of its historical value, despite it not being especially popular with collectors-- most aren't seeking to own one... same thing can be said for The Yellow Kid.  (B)  A character becomes so popular that they become important to the medium... Batman's popularity is important to the medium, Kangaroo Man's lack of popularity makes him less important.  But if they make a movie of Kangaroo Man, and it's hugely successful AND DC then goes on to make Kangaroo Man an integral part of its universe, and thousands of collectors start trying to find his 1st app., and he remains integral from now on (not just a passing fad) then eventually that 1st app. will be considered a key issue.

That's ironic...

Movies/TV shows do not make keys.

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