What is "perfect right edge front cover?"
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Is that when the front cover lines up with back cover and there is no interior pages showing?  Is this considered most desirable re: centering?

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Posted (edited)
On ‎5‎/‎17‎/‎2019 at 2:16 PM, NoMan said:

Is that when the front cover lines up with back cover and there is no interior pages showing?  Is this considered most desirable re: centering?

Hard to tell what that description is conveying with regards to how pages line up to covers. If a seller is using that as a term in his description, I'd ask him. He probably means it literally. Is it a silver age Marvel? S.A. Marvels typically have chips and/or pre-chips on the right edge. Is this "perfect right edge" referring to a description of a Silver age book? Is so, the language is describing the complete absence of any of the usual chips. pre-chips (non-detached chips), or rough cut right edge typical in the production of these.

Edited by James J Johnson

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1 hour ago, James J Johnson said:

Hard to tell what that description is conveying with regards to how pages line up to covers. If a seller is using that as a term in his description, I'd ask him. He probably means it literally. Is it a silver age Marvel? S.A. Marvels typically have chips and/or pre-chips on the right edge. Is this "perfect right edge" referring to a description of a Silver age book? Is so, the language is describing the complete absence of any of the usual chips. pre-chips (non-detached chips), or rough cut right edge typical in the production of these.

Thanks. It’s in reference to CC AF15 CGC 9.2 

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Posted (edited)
5 minutes ago, NoMan said:

Thanks. It’s in reference to CC AF15 CGC 9.2 

Well, that goes without saying on a CGC 9.2. CGC usually doesn't award 9.2 on Silver age books with chips, pre-chips, or significant roughly cut edges to the extent of damaging the paper. Dependent on the other defects present, or the lack of them, right edge chip-type defect is a flaw that all but eliminates a book for 9.2 consideration by CGC based on what I've observed. Especially on an AF 15, a book with a very high incidence of right edge production defect that damages the paper.

Edited by James J Johnson

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9 hours ago, NoMan said:

Thanks. It’s in reference to CC AF15 CGC 9.2 

In the context I think it just means no chipping or damage along the entire right edge.  The top corner even looks sharp.  If they were referring to any other aspect, I don't think it would explicitly state "right edge".  The wrap/centering is nice too - you see the full A in Amazing, full price circle, and full text bubble - which are often cut off if the wrap is just a little bit off.

 

 

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9 hours ago, 234wallst said:

In the context I think it just means no chipping or damage along the entire right edge.  The top corner even looks sharp.  If they were referring to any other aspect, I don't think it would explicitly state "right edge".  The wrap/centering is nice too - you see the full A in Amazing, full price circle, and full text bubble - which are often cut off if the wrap is just a little bit off.

 

 

This.   I'm trying to think of an instance where every leaf, all the pages and the covers line up perfectly flush, front to back, a book with the look of a flattened butcher block, and the only examples I can think of seeing that fit this are 3 edge trimmed books.  While modern comics may come closer to being produced with flush edges, front to back, the Silver age books are a far cry from this, even when better than average.

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I'm thinking it also could mean that you can see everything you're supposed to see. I'm thinking of TOS 39 where sometimes the double quotation marks are partially missing along the right edge due to how it was cut, or Strange Tales 101, which is a bear to find with the entire issue # box present. Just a thought, though more often this sort of image issue on AF15 is along the left, where the lower corner of the A in amazing is sometimes wrapped around to the rear, etc.

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Readcomix said:

I'm thinking it also could mean that you can see everything you're supposed to see. I'm thinking of TOS 39 where sometimes the double quotation marks are partially missing along the right edge due to how it was cut, or Strange Tales 101, which is a bear to find with the entire issue # box present. Just a thought, though more often this sort of image issue on AF15 is along the left, where the lower corner of the A in amazing is sometimes wrapped around to the rear, etc.

I think the only way you could ever consider that one or more comics were produced as intended by either the printer or creator, is when the spine line is dead center, edge-on, the staples likewise, thus no twist or rolling biased towards front or back, and that spine line is perfectly straight without tilt. Then one can note where the artwork ends on the three open edges as "probably as intended" if, and that's a big if, the comic sizes to the absolute norm left to right, top to bottom! Of course, this is why there's a lot of extra artwork on a pre-cut cover, usually about an extra 1/2" beyond what's normally seen when the spine line is dead edge-on. 

Then, you have books like TOS 39, that you mentioned, with many important art elements so close to or usually cut off by the right edge dependent on the fold of the spine; where that black line is located. These actually look better when the front cover art is wrapped around the back, what most might call misfolded, so that more art will show on the right edge of an average sized TOS 39. 39s that tend to be folded perfectly at the spine, front and back cover meeting edge on, have a trimmed look on the right edge, as you said, like quote marks are cut into.

Edited by James J Johnson

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