Microchamer paper.. Good or bad?
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Hi All,

I have a question about Microchamber paper, as I am trying to research a bit more on it and have come across varying information about it. Some say its good to help reduce pollutant in older comics SA, GA, Etc... but others say after its expired or absorbed enough gas or pollutants it could damage the comic thus negating the purpose of helping to protect the comic. 

Does anyone have an experience with MicroChamber paper? 

Does CGC still use the Microchamber paper? 

Lastly: 

Should you use Microchamber paper on Raw books (probably the valuable ones) in Mylar and full backs? 

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is it even worth it to put the microchamber paper in? 

Also I am guessing it would have to be custom cut to size as you wouldn't want it over hanging or to small on the inside because it might cause damage or is it to thin to even make a impact if its not perfect to the cover?

Thinking about buying some so trying to find the easiest and most cost effective way to use this product as I am mostly focused on preserving my SA books. 

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Posted (edited)

I found this in searching, trying to find it on the CGC site though :makepoint: 

  • Is it necessary to get my CGC book reholdered every 10 (or 7, or 12, etc.) years?
  • No. The CGC holder is designed for long-term preservation and provides superior protection for your books. A properly handled and stored CGC-certified book can last for generations.

    The CGC holder is made from high-quality materials and is entirely archival-safe. The inner well that holds books, for example, is comprised of PETG, a plastic that is well known to be archival-safe and extremely clear. This PETG well is placed inside of a durable outer case that is sonically welded to ensure a secure, tamper-evident seal.

    Many comic books, particularly vintage ones, naturally release ("off gas") acidic molecules over time. The CGC holder is therefore designed to not have an air-tight seal, which would otherwise trap these acidic molecules. 

    For added long-term preservation, CGC inserts MicroChamber® paper into vintage books prior to encapsulation. This MicroChamber paper helps to neutralize the natural acidity of some books by using a specialized, proprietary “zeolite” that was designed to absorb and hold the molecules known to damage archival collections. That is why MicroChamber paper is used by many of the world’s most respected museums and institutions, including the Smithsonian Institution, the Getty Conservation Institute, the Louvre, the British Museum and the Northeast Document Conservation Center. 

    When CGC was first established in 2000, we thoroughly researched and implemented the best practices in archival preservation. We took a conservative approach and suggested that customers may wish to consider reholdering their books after approximately seven to ten years so that the MicroChamber paper could be replaced. 

    Today, however, we have the benefit of having graded 4.1 million books over a 17-year period. This is an incredibly large sample size that represents books of all eras, paper types, paper qualities, storage conditions and grades. CGC and its customers now have ample evidence that demonstrates it is not necessary to have your CGC books reholdered simply to replace the MicroChamber paper. CGC’s archival-safe holder, with its combination of features that includes air permeability, MicroChamber paper and a secure, sonic seal, has been shown to provide superior long-term protection for the millions of books that have been encapsulated by CGC. 

    We have never seen a properly stored CGC-certified comic book that needed to be reholdered for archival reasons. Nonetheless, there are still a number of benefits to utilizing CGC’s reholder service, including the crystal-clear display, enhanced aesthetic and durable construction of CGC’s new holder. 

    It is important to remember that proper storage is essential to preserving your books, and collectors should take steps to minimize exposure to heat, humidity, vibration and light. CGC recommends that CGC-certified books be stored in a dark, dry, cool, temperature-controlled location.

    CGC's holders have withstood the test of time and over the last 17 years have been shown to provide outstanding long-term protection and preservation. No other comic book grading services can make that claim.

    MicroChamber® is a registered trademark of Conservation Resources International, Inc.

It came from this thread...

 

Edited by ADAMANTIUM

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I use it with most of my mylar'd books and even some of my magazines.  Won't hurt the book and offers a little bit of protection for your investment. 

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:takeit:

Can someone suggest a good source for buying suitable micro chamber paper, properly sized and not too thick ?

 

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Posted (edited)

Is the main reason to use micro chamber paper (MCP) to lessen the impact of the acid/etc from the pulp paper turning pages yellow? And if true-- Is there a point at which the use of the MCP is not really all that useful--- like once the pages reach cream or worse levels?  As most of us have seen from experience, you need to change out bags and boards periodically-- and in doing so, you can see the yellowing of the bags and boards-- and what almost appears like a leaking on some backing boards that you let go too long between changing them- especially with silver age and older books.

Edited by 01TheDude

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the one thing I hate about the paper is when it falls out and you can see it. sometimes you can tap the slab and get it back but I have some magazine size slabs that even when I tap it won't move. :mad:

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2 hours ago, TwoPiece said:

Micro-chamber paper good. Thor not going for the head bad.

We've got to cut Thor some slack.  Stormbreaker was brand new at the time and he threw it from hundreds of feet away.  The fact that he hit Thanos at all is pretty impressive.  It's not a scalpel...it's a big ol' hammer/ax. 

/Nerd rant over

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1 minute ago, Turtle said:

We've got to cut Thor some slack.  Stormbreaker was brand new at the time and he threw it from hundreds of feet away.  The fact that he hit Thanos at all is pretty impressive.  It's not a scalpel...it's a big ol' hammer/ax. 

/Nerd rant over

That's not why, though.

Thor intentionally did not go for the head because he wanted his revenge moment. "You're going to die for that." "I told you - you die for that."

Good storytelling about sacrifice by the Russo Bros.

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1 minute ago, TwoPiece said:

That's not why, though.

Thor intentionally did not go for the head because he wanted his revenge moment. "You're going to die for that." "I told you - you die for that."

Good storytelling about sacrifice by the Russo Bros.

Thor definitely did some gloating when he should have been doing some neck-snapping when he got up close, I'll give you that.  Though Thor and Thanos had a bit of a rivalry going at that point and Thanos felt the need to do some gloating of his own.  Thanos could have snapped immediately, but purposefully waited for Thor to get close so he could taunt him, knowing full well he'd be able to snap and escape. 

Man, those movies were good!  Surprisingly nuanced for as many characters had to be crammed into them. 

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7 minutes ago, Turtle said:

Thor definitely did some gloating when he should have been doing some neck-snapping when he got up close, I'll give you that.  Though Thor and Thanos had a bit of a rivalry going at that point and Thanos felt the need to do some gloating of his own.  Thanos could have snapped immediately, but purposefully waited for Thor to get close so he could taunt him, knowing full well he'd be able to snap and escape. 

Man, those movies were good!  Surprisingly nuanced for as many characters had to be crammed into them. 

Oh, definitely.

I think the Russo Bros really wanted to:

  1. Make it look like all hope is lost after Thanos used the Time Stone to reverse Vision's death, pluck the final piece from his face, and complete the Infinity Gauntlet.
  2. Flip the page and make it seem like the heroes would in fact win with Thor coming to the rescue.
  3. Show Thor unwilling to sacrifice his pride for glory.
  4. Give Thanos the 'final laugh' with his retort.

I'm not sure if simply snapping his fingers after Thor's assault would have felt as natural a response, y'know? I wasn't a big fan of that dialogue initially, but it hasn't bothered me the last 85 or so times I've watched it. lol

Phenomenal movies, for sure!

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