Treasure Chest Vol 17 - Godless Communism
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#2 begins with the communism story until it ends in #20. Art works were done by Reed Crandall. This volume has decent values than most volumes. Do you think it is worth to collect them?

Edited by JollyComics

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In over forty years, I've never had a single person inquire about a Treasure Chest. Collect them if you are interested, but the market for them is pretty small. I don't think anti- communism comics are as appealing to today's collectors as they were to kids who grew up in the 50s/60s. 

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I would like to see some interior pages......for quality of the artwork...if it great...its collectable

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5 minutes ago, Mmehdy said:

I would like to see some interior pages......for quality of the artwork...if it great...its collectable

You can check inside pages of Reed Crandall’s art work. Interior pages

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6 hours ago, JollyComics said:

You can check inside pages of Reed Crandall’s art work. Interior pages

Thanks,great artwork....I would purchase or try to collect with the understanding that it probably won't go up in price anytime In the future, but its good material and worth collecting

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39 minutes ago, Mmehdy said:

Thanks,great artwork....I would purchase or try to collect with the understanding that it probably won't go up in price anytime In the future, but its good material and worth collecting

Those comic books were distributed In parochial schools only. I remembered those books at my church school for my communion. Don’t see them very often outside of the schools.

I agreed with you to keep them in future.

Edited by JollyComics

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On 12/24/2019 at 8:04 PM, shadroch said:

In over forty years, I've never had a single person inquire about a Treasure Chest. Collect them if you are interested, but the market for them is pretty small. I don't think anti- communism comics are as appealing to today's collectors as they were to kids who grew up in the 50s/60s. 

Kids who grew up in the 70s - (early) 90s would also remember lots of anti-"commie" rhetoric.   I know some people who still have no idea that Russia's not Communist today.

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13 hours ago, bluechip said:

Kids who grew up in the 70s - (early) 90s would also remember lots of anti-"commie" rhetoric.   I know some people who still have no idea that Russia's not Communist today.

Not like the paranoia of the fifties., or going through duck and cover drills for the inevitable nuclear exchanges. I could be mistaken about the popularity today, but I'd say it's definitely down from when I got into comics.

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3 hours ago, shadroch said:

Not like the paranoia of the fifties., or going through duck and cover drills for the inevitable nuclear exchanges. I could be mistaken about the popularity today, but I'd say it's definitely down from when I got into comics.

Oh, for sure it was nothing close.   But I grew up after the "duck and cover" era and I have a copy of the treasure chest comic not because I read it when it was published but because it was the most extreme expression of an era that was still going on.    Most people who collect ww2-related comics came of age long after that war, and my kids are interested in the Vietnam conflict and the hippie era even though it was decades before they were born.   It's not just a question of whether people grew up in a particular epoch but also how powerful are the stories and the imagery from it.

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I have collected the whole series a few years ago (and not only that one).
There is some excellent material in many year runs Treasure Chest, including a lot of work of Joe Sinnott, as his masterful Life of Pope John XXIII – considered it was done when he was a young artist and I guess without much visual documentation, it‘s an astonishing work. :)

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On 12/25/2019 at 5:04 AM, shadroch said:

In over forty years, I've never had a single person inquire about a Treasure Chest. Collect them if you are interested, but the market for them is pretty small. I don't think anti- communism comics are as appealing to today's collectors as they were to kids who grew up in the 50s/60s. 

That’s precisely the reason for which they should be made known. ;)

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High res scan of splash page of episode 4 of "The Story of Pope John XXIII, who won our Hearts" by Joe Sinnott.
From Treasure Chest vol. 18 (the following year of "This Godless Communism").

 V18_04_p30_Pope_John_XXIII_600ppi.thumb.jpg.fb6919337f4b48298b19887afe6bd2f0.jpg

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On 12/24/2019 at 10:04 PM, shadroch said:

In over forty years, I've never had a single person inquire about a Treasure Chest. Collect them if you are interested, but the market for them is pretty small. I don't think anti- communism comics are as appealing to today's collectors as they were to kids who grew up in the 50s/60s. 

I discovered that MyComicShop will buy some Treasure Chests ( as well as Topix, another similar title I had been caring around for decades with absolutely no personal interest in)

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Posted (edited)
15 hours ago, Hamlet said:

I discovered that MyComicShop will buy some Treasure Chests ( as well as Topix, another similar title I had been caring around for decades with absolutely no personal interest in)

Throw me the first two year runs (1942-43, mostly) and I’ll show you what "caring" means… :D
Of course, the ones post-1947 are relatively not rare, also because not much collected. But in higher grades… it’s another matter!

Edited by vaillant

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6 minutes ago, vaillant said:

Throw me the first two year runs (1942-43, mostly) and I’ll show you what "caring" means… :D
Of course, the ones post-1947 are relatively not rare, also because not much collected. But in higher grades… it’s another matter!

Mine were from 1949.  I sent them expecting the “Good” price ($2.88 in trade) based on what they were grading the other issues they had .  They haven’t graded them yet.  I think they were a little better than that, but it’s hard to grade these.  They appear to have been printed without any special cover stock/gloss.  Am I correct in that assumption?
 

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Posted (edited)
8 minutes ago, Hamlet said:

Mine were from 1949.  I sent them expecting the “Good” price ($2.88 in trade) based on what they were grading the other issues they had .  They haven’t graded them yet.  I think they were a little better than that, but it’s hard to grade these.  They appear to have been printed without any special cover stock/gloss.  Am I correct in that assumption?
 

I am not sure I can reply appropriately, as the only issue I have is a 1950 (I think) issue which is a rare Christmas issue and a File copy (purchased that from Metropolis, years ago) and it has a glossy cover.
But I think you are correct: the issues up to 1949 had covers with the same paper stock of the insides. The earlier ones too, of course, as it was basically like a European comics journal (no cover) but in comic book format.

As for the content, I can imagine that, unlike Treasure Chest, wasn’t much exciting. The wartime issues are interesting as they feature brief lives of many saints (of varying artistic quality) which occasionally have insights in coeval historical events, like 12/1944 which opens a life of St. Benedict in this unusual and poignant way: the bombing of the Mount Cassino abbey by the allied forces (with some subtly implied criticism).
 

Timeless Topix 1944_12_p11.jpg

Edited by vaillant

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The "cover" of the same issue, which starts with a life of the recently canonized Card. Newman (not the equivalent of a super-hero movie boost, I guess?).

Timeless Topix 1944_12.jpg

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While I am at it, cover of the first issue featuring the Joe Sinnott's life of Pope John XXIII (my best copy). Photo cover!
Across the run there is also a Joe Sinnott cover featuring John XXIII as a young priest (as in the panel I showed above).

Treasure Chest v18 No_1 (Copy B).jpg

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P.S. Some bits of trivia: Joe Sinnott temporarily refused the offer from Stan Lee to become the regular inker of The Fantastic Four, to fulfill the commitment taken with Geo Pflaum to complete the John XXIII story.

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