Framing Question
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I've been told many times that when framing art, the art shouldn't be in direct contact with the glass.  What is the reason for this, and how is it different than having art in a mylar sleeve?

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When art is framed it would be pressed up against the glass. Left over time the media used to create it , pencil, ink, paints could adhere and bond to the glass. Removing it could damage the artwork. With mylar skeeves the pressure isnt as strong as against glass. Plus with mylar artwork would move around alot and maybe ever be removed from the mylar

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It also is a humidity and temperature issue. Moisture is in the air all the time. It tends to condense on glass (or plexi), and over a long period of time it can cause different issues.

In the case of inked comic work, I'd mostly be worried about ink sticking to the glass when pressed up against it. Or the paper can stick, if a decade of little tiny bits of moisture get in there and condense and dry, condense and dry for years. Not something you can see happen. Doesn't look like a problem until you try to remove it.

The surface of the glass can also heat up, which can cause paper to become brittle over time, if it's essentially baking the moisture out of the paper for years and years. Spacing the glass from the piece alleviates these issues.

If you are a collector that frames something and take it out of the frame for the next big thing every couple years, chances are nothing would happen. If you are a collector that is going to leave your piece in the frame for the next 2 years, you better think twice about it.

Also I don't think it's a super great idea to leave art in mylars unmoved for decades either, though I'm sure most pieces do ok being in storage in closets, books, portfolios or whatever. But if they were out on display in an un-sealed mylar, unmoved for a decade or more, I could see a few of them having similar sticking issues, potentially. Less of the paper warping issues.

 

And of course keeping the work out of the sun, and away from fluorescent or incandescent bulbs has the greatest longevity/archival benefits.

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, ESeffinga said:

 

The surface of the glass can also heat up, which can cause paper to become brittle over time, if it's essentially baking the moisture out of the paper for years and years. Spacing the glass from the piece alleviates these issues.

If you are a collector that frames something and take it out of the frame for the next big thing every couple years, chances are nothing would happen. If you are a collector that is going to leave your piece in the frame for the next 2 years, you better think twice about it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assuming you mean framed without spacing the glass from the art?

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4 hours ago, Stefanomjr said:

Assuming you mean framed without spacing the glass from the art?

Yes.  i know if you have a mat, you're okay, as it keeps the art from the glass, but I want to float some of my art so you can see all the editorial comment/marks.  Turns out you have to buy frame spacers online, and it's like $50/100 ft.

 

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1 minute ago, pinupcartooncollector said:

Turns out you have to buy frame spacers online, and it's like $50/100 ft.

You can DIY spacers too, just depends if you're the type to do things like that.

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1 minute ago, pinupcartooncollector said:

What do you use?

 

You can use anything, bits of cardboard stacked, stryofoam, etc. Or you can double mat, one uncut behind that you mount the piece to and the second cut with an opening larger (say 1/2 to 1" larger than piece) essentially 'framing' the piece while also providing just enough 'lift' to create that space. Or use a box frame designed for floating, which incorporates space as part of the design. It mostly depends on what you what the final presentation to look like, that should be driving "how you get there".

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4 minutes ago, vodou said:

You can use anything, bits of cardboard stacked, stryofoam, etc. Or you can double mat, one uncut behind that you mount the piece to and the second cut with an opening larger (say 1/2 to 1" larger than piece) essentially 'framing' the piece while also providing just enough 'lift' to create that space. Or use a box frame designed for floating, which incorporates space as part of the design. It mostly depends on what you what the final presentation to look like, that should be driving "how you get there".

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Thanks!  I used to take my stuff to a framer, and some stuff I still do, but the cost can add up in a hurry.  Trying the do it yourself (read Michael's) these days.

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54 minutes ago, pinupcartooncollector said:

Thanks!  I used to take my stuff to a framer, and some stuff I still do, but the cost can add up in a hurry.  Trying the do it yourself (read Michael's) these days.

Ah, floating, it is a great look, and I agree about keeping margin notes visible.

Just use archival hinges/adhesive, and only outside the art area would be my 

bit of caution as a suggestion.  David

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2 hours ago, pinupcartooncollector said:

Yes.  i know if you have a mat, you're okay, as it keeps the art from the glass, but I want to float some of my art so you can see all the editorial comment/marks.  Turns out you have to buy frame spacers online, and it's like $50/100 ft.

 

This site has shorter lengths for cheaper: https://www.metroframe.com/Products/PLastic-Spacers-for-Picture-Frames/

I just found their site the other day and am not sure if they're archival or not, though

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5 hours ago, aokartman said:

Ah, floating, it is a great look, and I agree about keeping margin notes visible.

Just use archival hinges/adhesive, and only outside the art area would be my 

bit of caution as a suggestion.  David

Ironic that you mention archival adhesives given that many of pieces feature old glue (from word balloons) and tape stains.  In many ways, comic book original art is one of the few collectibles where imperfections are often tolerated!

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I wanted the floating look for my pieces too, but my framer basically gave me the same rundown as @ESeffinga as to why that was a horrible idea. Attached are examples of what he came up with for me. Pretty similar to what @vodou's got going on. The pieces are attached to foamcore board using archival hinges. I really like how it turned out. It cost me about $300 to frame the DPS with 99% UV resistant glass and about the same for the single page with museum glass (same UV resistance, but no glare).

1 hour ago, pinupcartooncollector said:

Ironic that you mention archival adhesives given that many of pieces feature old glue (from word balloons) and tape stains.  In many ways, comic book original art is one of the few collectibles where imperfections are often tolerated!

This is likely only tolerated since original art is a one-of-a-kind market. Every piece is take it or leave it as is since there is no other. 

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9 hours ago, Varanis said:

The pieces are attached to foamcore board using archival hinges.

100% totally legit and museum approved.

Maybe not awesome for 500 years (or maybe just fine!), but excellent for the years you'll own it.

Next guy can figure out things appropriate for him - then!

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13 hours ago, vodou said:

100% totally legit and museum approved.

Maybe not awesome for 500 years (or maybe just fine!), but excellent for the years you'll own it.

Next guy can figure out things appropriate for him - then!

That’s what I was told. I was considering springing for the really expensive matting to mount on due to the value and significance of that page, but my framer said while foamcore is technically less archival, it makes essentially no difference. 

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These are 11x17 and come in vertical and horizontal. You can just slide the Mylar art in. Easy to hang, inexpensive and the art can be changed out. 

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Edited by Drewsky

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I have a 16x20 canvas piece. Do I...

Hang as is

Frame with no glass

Frame with glass

393292531_ohyihiuh(3).thumb.jpg.6800410b52c99b4148c9784d8fd883a3.jpg

 

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Is that marker on canvas?

Do whatevever strikes your fancy, as far as the framing goes. The more you spend the more you have tied up in a giant headsketch.

Glass isn't necessary with paint. Probably not marker over that gessoed canvas either, but if it's marker I'd keep it as far away from any lighting as possible. not just sun, but your interior lights as well. Also the gesso may yellow fairly quickly with time, depending on it's source. Gessoed canvas is generally intended to be covered in paint. Exposing it to light may or may not see it "age" over time.


Beyond that, for canvas pieces, I think a canvas floater mount is cleanest. And they can be bought to size for cheap from places like pictureframes.com. I think even DickBlick.com might have some pre-finished ones available. Betting this is a standard pre-made/stretched canvas at that 16" x 20"

It'd just come down to personal preference and the depth of the canvas, as to what look you want the frame to have.

For example:

https://www.pictureframes.com/custom-framing/black-picture-frames?frame_type=355&popular_frame_sizes=1381

 

 

Edited by ESeffinga
Clearly my fingers don't work.

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1 minute ago, ESeffinga said:

for canvas pieces, I think a canvas floater mount is cleanest.

Yes.

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