any theories on why prices seem to be dropping with a lot of books?
6 6

194 posts in this topic

57,325 posts
15 hours ago, HuddyBee said:

I think its pretty obvious the comic market just isn't focusing on DC for better or for worse.

You could've made this comment every year since 1961 and been absolutely correct.

But that's okay.  If you're into the titles, why would you want a bunch of Marvel Zombie fanboy equivalents competing with you?  I was really into ultra-HG pre-1964 SA DC for a long time, and loved the fact that I didn't have to compete with all of the Marvel big boy collectors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
320 posts
5 minutes ago, tth2 said:

If you're into the titles, why would you want a bunch of Marvel Zombie fanboy equivalents competing with you?  I was really into ultra-HG pre-1964 SA DC for a long time, and loved the fact that I didn't have to compete with all of the Marvel big boy collectors.

I'm quite certain one of the reasons I grew so fond of DC comics is because (other than their being better lol) of necessity. I could afford DC. So I bought DC and learned to love it. I was only surrounded by DC books. While I would love for DC books to get the love they deserve someday, right now I'm loving the cheap prices, and my being the only guy in the world who wants the books.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
217 posts
6 hours ago, Glassman10 said:

The Santa Fe area including the surrounding community heading up towards the Glorietta Pass at that time (1967)  was an ocean of dead vehicles. You just weren't anyone unless you had at least 12 dead vehicles in your yard and not just any vehicles, stuff from the golden ages. I happpened to have a Dodge Power wagon that had dropped the drain bolt on the differential and warped the casing and needed a replacement, so I began to search the hills for a power wagon. I did find one, did get the entire differential and installed it. It cost about one hundred dollars as I recall but that search led me to strange places looking for parts. One place was Apodaca Hill in Santa Fe where I encountered "The bus".  The bus was not in good shape. It had broken windows, dents, flat dead paint, a "Bluebird" as I recall but that could be wrong. It had two wheels (Front) windshield wipers still in place! and the door ajar. Pressing and cleaning would not help. Ajar doors have drawn me in since Pre  Zork so I poked about. It could have contained Ken Kesey. He scooted around Santa Fe and Taos in his bus "Further" all the time he was there intereacting with the communes. But this appeared more desolate than Ken's piece, way too old. It was not far into the seating area that the box sat. There was a lot of stuff on all the seats. The owner knew I loved comics as I poked at the top offerings and said I should just take it. He's moved to Ohio now and I long ago lost touch with him. I took it and after establishing that there were no rear ends there for a dodge I left. The box contents were remarkable  but at the time not massively valuable, more archival. As I took them out of the box, it was odd how well preserved they were. The surprising one in there was ASM16 which graded out as a 9.2!, just sitting in this half open box in a stack. It had numerous early ASM's including 14 which I sold to a man in Illinois who expressed interest here. I had scanned it and there was a flaw that was quite difficult to see in the scan and there was transactional disappointment but he said he should have caught it so it was on him. I didn't feel good about that so I gave him the Avengers 4. Happy camper after that.  He went on to purchase two ASM 129's from me in the 9.0-9.4 range at a very happy price for him. There were a bunch of X-men, Strange Tales , early FF4. It was a true time capsule of stuff flung in a box and there perhaps years. But, there it was about fifteen books down  an AF15 worth about $80 dollars at the time, about one month's rent!. Had some gunk on the cover. I bought a plastic bag for it! We didn't preserve anything those days.  I just felt weirdly fortunate and tucked it in with my other comics. I used to walk across Santa Fe from my studio, about three miles and every third thursday the comics rack at the bus depot engorged with new material. I would take a five dollar bill and do what I could at .12 a shot. It went out to my little house where my friend and I would devour what the two of us bought. At that time, dealers were rare. Howard Rogofsky sold comics in NYC, the mile high collection was in the future and we just loved our stupid comics. Years went by and I kept it up. My mom had already thrown out all of my .10 cent books and baseball cards but I had fooled her and moved 1,000 miles away. 

So, when I sold the comics at the age of 70, it was because there was no future good to my having them. As I said, it took over a year to get organized and I met a number of charlatans ready to relieve me of the burden. So, sympathizing with new collectors, I simply told my process here on valuation.  As I look back, it's amazing that I allowed Bob Storms to simply walk out of my house with the AF15 consigned without a scrap of paper indicating the arrangement.  The two days I spent with Bob taught me more about comics than I ever could have learned elsewhere. It was stupid of me to ever mention the sales price and I haven't done that in a long time. I would say that 10K alone went to capital gains, double that to the boy and the rest, I bought Mastercard at about $150 a share and these days it's around $320.  So we all did well.  I get stupid lucky with junk like this. As a nine year old, going through rolls of pennies with my brother, I found a 1909-s VDB with actual mint luster traces. Someone had to have intentionally put that coin back in circulation but I sold it to my brother for $75 bucks and that seemed like all the money in the world. I really only liked Buffalo nickels . Sort of like Thor.  I use to win a lot at black out bingo at the beach club with Blue haired old ladies with doilies on their heads for luck  as well. Blackout always coughed  up about $75 bucks too. Those women could really glare.  What a great childhood. 

I still believe there are boxes of books out there to be found.  Around here, there are all these summer houses byt the lake that still have the contents from 1955.  So, no one went to the dump and now those houses are all being cleaned out. They printed a boatload of AF15's Seek and ye might find. You have to look in odd places. But sharing the story is pretty risky. 

Did I mention the bus had split rims?

I'm yet to figure out how to quote just a section of a story. 

Glassman - thank you for sharing! What an amazing and well told story! 

I'm glad you took care of it for all those years and the value materialized so much. 

I'll be keeping my eyes open for old buses and houses being cleaned out :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
847 posts

That was more like the bus Kezey  had but his was shorter. God that man did not draw a sober breath in all the time he was between Santa Fe and Taos. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
847 posts
1 hour ago, KCOComics said:

I'm yet to figure out how to quote just a section of a story. 

Glassman - thank you for sharing! What an amazing and well told story! 

I'm glad you took care of it for all those years and the value materialized so much. 

I'll be keeping my eyes open for old buses and houses being cleaned out :)

well, it's nice to not get cussed out for honestly telling the stories.  It was before variants, before questioning grade as related to value. Those guys were punching out 15-18 titles a month, printing, and distributing all over the country for essentially the love of the game.  The followers were like the folks in the grateful dead, going from idea to production to success to failure. Kirby tried so much stuff. I still have here a copy of his shot at the "Spirit World" which was dumb as a rock but he was throwing stuff at the walls 24/7. People can give Stan as much as they can muster but he drove it ahead, month after month. I loved what Kirby did with the forever people, Mr Miracle and the new gods and the switches from studio to studio were just new attempts at making the rent. Look at Don Martin in MAD magazine. Just month after month. Look at "Spy vs Spy".  I loved my .35 cent paperbacks from MD.  "Swamp Thing going "Heep Heep". We were all so young. The bus fits. Santa Fe fit. Now, it's mostly money and what's going up fractionally.  I got so lucky to just be there. Your life is a story. Write it down. 

What I found to be so odd and so sad for me was when my son and I scanned the AF15, we shot every single page and I still have those scans. When Bob Sold it, I told him the page shots all existed and would the buyer like them. The answer was "No".  I still don't really understand that. I simply cn't relate to that. I have always thought that artwork to be terribly naiive but every artist I ever have seen matures as they work. This was a beginning with a preposterous story. 

Edited by Glassman10

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
94,515 posts
On 1/29/2020 at 5:04 PM, Iceman399 said:

It's almost the perfect storm to see a pullback in sales: 

End of an "era" with the MCU - almost impossible to refute how much the MCU and for lesser part the DCCU impacted prices. 
Sales tax - I've talked about this with a lot of Canadian collectors and it was like when our dollar was at parity back in 2012/2013 when all of a sudden it tanked and we were hit with a "25%" increase in prices.  Many stopped buying nearly as much.  It took about 6 months for us to realize yup it's here to "stay" so might as well bite the bullet and get to it.
Calendar - as many have said the winter season is typically the slowest, between holidays and commitments a lot of books slip through the cracks and cripple the 90day gpa on the less commonly sold books (get 2 sales for $600 and all of a sudden the 5 sale GPA is almost cut in half if it was trending at $900).  
Video games - I don't think there is that much money leaving the hobby for video games.  We've seen how pumped that market is by "THE" company and their investors pushing the agenda, the same company that auctioned off the big game, is investors of the company and also bought the game.  All they did was take money out of the left pocket and put it in the right pocket.  Several early spenders are getting absolutely hammered the second time a similar copy comes to market.  Video games aren't new and instead we are just being pushed it by a very select to look at me and the price this copy sold for.

All of that said in the last week we've noticed an uptick in sales and inquiries, is that a sign things are turning around?  I can't say yes, but it's a positive sign.  Can't always have positive gains but I don't think it's a downward spiral.
 

A similar thing happened just over 10 years ago.

The market had been on fire for a decade.

The world economy had crashed and hadn't recovered.

Several new pedigrees were discovered within a year of each other.

Pressing for the masses was starting and people were afraid of what it would do to the market and slowed down spending.

Winter season was upon us.

A few major players pulled OUT of the hobby at the same time.

Perfect storm of depressed prices.

It's just a cycle and has been happening since the beginning of time...and the mid 1930's for comics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4,352 posts
On 1/23/2020 at 11:09 PM, RUSSIAN BEAR said:

A lot of them got bounces because of the Avengers movies(like TOS 39, JIM 83 and others ) that will never happen again

...until it does.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4,352 posts
On 1/24/2020 at 6:07 AM, comicginger1789 said:

Worst time to sell books is just after Christmas and into January/February. Prices traditionally drop across the board.

It has ever been thus, long as I can remember

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3,634 posts
10 hours ago, Glassman10 said:

I still believe there are boxes of books out there to be found.  Around here, there are all these summer houses byt the lake that still have the contents from 1955.  So, no one went to the dump and now those houses are all being cleaned out. They printed a boatload of AF15's Seek and ye might find. You have to look in odd places. But sharing the story is pretty risky. 

Well, thanks for sharing. It's the best story I've read in ages...  :foryou:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3,861 posts

Thanks Mr. Glassman!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
320 posts

Awesome story to read. Love those insights into the past on comics.

 

P.S. 300th post, woo!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27,850 posts
5 hours ago, KCOComics said:

I'm yet to figure out how to quote just a section of a story. 

Glassman - thank you for sharing! What an amazing and well told story! 

I'm glad you took care of it for all those years and the value materialized so much. 

I'll be keeping my eyes open for old buses and houses being cleaned out :)

Click the quote button for the post you want to quote.  That will put the post in a blue box with room below for you to reply.  Click in the blue box and edit text.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
217 posts
1 minute ago, thehumantorch said:

  Click in the blue box and edit text.

Well look at that! Lol. 

Thank you!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27,850 posts
1 minute ago, KCOComics said:
4 minutes ago, thehumantorch said:

  Click in the blue box and edit text.

Well look at that! Lol. 

Thank you!

And if you want to quote a chain of multiple posts like above click at the top of the first post and drag down to the bottom of the last post (2 in this case) and then click the 'quote selection' black box that pops up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27,850 posts
11 hours ago, Glassman10 said:

The Santa Fe area including the surrounding community heading up towards the Glorietta Pass at that time (1967)  was an ocean of dead vehicles. You just weren't anyone unless you had at least 12 dead vehicles in your yard and not just any vehicles, stuff from the golden ages. I happpened to have a Dodge Power wagon that had dropped the drain bolt on the differential and warped the casing and needed a replacement, so I began to search the hills for a power wagon. I did find one, did get the entire differential and installed it. It cost about one hundred dollars as I recall but that search led me to strange places looking for parts. One place was Apodaca Hill in Santa Fe where I encountered "The bus".  The bus was not in good shape. It had broken windows, dents, flat dead paint, a "Bluebird" as I recall but that could be wrong. It had two wheels (Front) windshield wipers still in place! and the door ajar. Pressing and cleaning would not help. Ajar doors have drawn me in since Pre  Zork so I poked about. It could have contained Ken Kesey. He scooted around Santa Fe and Taos in his bus "Further" all the time he was there intereacting with the communes. But this appeared more desolate than Ken's piece, way too old. It was not far into the seating area that the box sat. There was a lot of stuff on all the seats. The owner knew I loved comics as I poked at the top offerings and said I should just take it. He's moved to Ohio now and I long ago lost touch with him. I took it and after establishing that there were no rear ends there for a dodge I left. The box contents were remarkable  but at the time not massively valuable, more archival. As I took them out of the box, it was odd how well preserved they were. The surprising one in there was ASM16 which graded out as a 9.2!, just sitting in this half open box in a stack. It had numerous early ASM's including 14 which I sold to a man in Illinois who expressed interest here. I had scanned it and there was a flaw that was quite difficult to see in the scan and there was transactional disappointment but he said he should have caught it so it was on him. I didn't feel good about that so I gave him the Avengers 4. Happy camper after that.  He went on to purchase two ASM 129's from me in the 9.0-9.4 range at a very happy price for him. There were a bunch of X-men, Strange Tales , early FF4. It was a true time capsule of stuff flung in a box and there perhaps years. But, there it was about fifteen books down  an AF15 worth about $80 dollars at the time, about one month's rent!. Had some gunk on the cover. I bought a plastic bag for it! We didn't preserve anything those days.  I just felt weirdly fortunate and tucked it in with my other comics. I used to walk across Santa Fe from my studio, about three miles and every third thursday the comics rack at the bus depot engorged with new material. I would take a five dollar bill and do what I could at .12 a shot. It went out to my little house where my friend and I would devour what the two of us bought. At that time, dealers were rare. Howard Rogofsky sold comics in NYC, the mile high collection was in the future and we just loved our stupid comics. Years went by and I kept it up. My mom had already thrown out all of my .10 cent books and baseball cards but I had fooled her and moved 1,000 miles away. 

So, when I sold the comics at the age of 70, it was because there was no future good to my having them. As I said, it took over a year to get organized and I met a number of charlatans ready to relieve me of the burden. So, sympathizing with new collectors, I simply told my process here on valuation.  As I look back, it's amazing that I allowed Bob Storms to simply walk out of my house with the AF15 consigned without a scrap of paper indicating the arrangement.  The two days I spent with Bob taught me more about comics than I ever could have learned elsewhere. It was stupid of me to ever mention the sales price and I haven't done that in a long time. I would say that 10K alone went to capital gains, double that to the boy and the rest, I bought Mastercard at about $150 a share and these days it's around $320.  So we all did well.  I get stupid lucky with junk like this. As a nine year old, going through rolls of pennies with my brother, I found a 1909-s VDB with actual mint luster traces. Someone had to have intentionally put that coin back in circulation but I sold it to my brother for $75 bucks and that seemed like all the money in the world. I really only liked Buffalo nickels . Sort of like Thor.  I use to win a lot at black out bingo at the beach club with Blue haired old ladies with doilies on their heads for luck  as well. Blackout always coughed  up about $75 bucks too. Those women could really glare.  What a great childhood. 

I still believe there are boxes of books out there to be found.  Around here, there are all these summer houses byt the lake that still have the contents from 1955.  So, no one went to the dump and now those houses are all being cleaned out. They printed a boatload of AF15's Seek and ye might find. You have to look in odd places. But sharing the story is pretty risky. 

Did I mention the bus had split rims?

Great story Glass.  I really get a feel for your youth and your love of comics and other associated time wasters. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
217 posts
2 minutes ago, thehumantorch said:

And if you want to quote a chain of multiple posts like above click at the top of the first post and drag down to the bottom of the last post (2 in this case) and then click the 'quote selection' black box that pops up.

Ok,  I tried. 

That was too complicated of a move for me!  I'll get there. 

Thanks for your help

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
6 6