furthur

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About furthur

  • Boards Title
    Collector

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  • Location
    Atlanta GA

Display Name History

  1. I am a big fan of Winsor McCay, so a dozen years or so ago I got Ryan Sook to do a fun little pastiche for me using my name and caricature called "Little Benno in Slumberland". It was super cool (in my CAF gallery if anyone wants to look) and I mostly let the idea drop, though I did have two more done along the way over the last decade by Mike DeCarlo (who did a hilarious Peanuts take with me and Lucy as my psychiatrist) and Greg Theakston who did a Kirby riff. Last year I picked up where I left off and got an amazing piece from Frank Brunner and I kind of got the bug. I was asked by the head of the cartooning department at SCAD here in Atlanta to guest lecture in a cartooning class about original art collecting and I decided that it would be fun to put my money where my mouth was and offered to commission a piece from one of the students. A couple of folks sent samples and I picked Anderson Carmen to do the commission. It was a GREAT choice. I am amazed by both the creativity and the craft in this piece. I know its a little (my wife says a LOT and I cannot deny that) self absorbed as a commission theme, but I love this piece!!
  2. My Picture is definitely from 87-it was the only year I went until the mid 2000's. I would guess you were correct about the ads appearing after the show rather than before it. Otherwise, I can't imagine that there would have been the same volume of material from DKR 1 and 4 that was at the show-it might not have been complete, but there were certainly many key pages. Of course they could have run just before the show, but because of the slowness of getting the CBG back then, the bulk of the folks who saw it may have gotten it after the show even if it ran in an issue timed to come out before the show. Just as a historical FYI, Bernie Wrightson's art to all of "Cycle of the Werewoif" was also sold at that show. I wanted to get my birthday month (November) which was an awesome piece of a cemetery , but it got nixed by my girlfriend for reasons best left for another day (though I did explain it in my article about Bernie for the latest issue of the CFA-apa which will be coming out soon!)
  3. Thank you Felix for the shout out on the latest podcast. It was interesting to hear a bit more of the story behind the art I purchased at San Diego in 1987-hard to believe now that it was 30 years ago! Scott, I certainly didn't think that pic I shot with my disposable Kodak camera would end up being so famous in the original art world. I'm glad you were willing to pose for it though. Of course one reason I had you hold up that great Batman splash was because I wanted to remember the one that I couldn't afford to take home that day and I figured it would likely be the last time I saw it (which thus far has turned out to be correct!) One question-I know SDCC was a lot looser back then when it was in the hotel. I saw from the pic that you were set up next to Mike Thibideaux's booth. Since you were friends, did they let you set up that way so you could hang out with a friend, or was it just happenstance? I was staying with Mitch Itkowitz and he got a spot along the wall-I assume that was harder to do, but clearly a better deal as a lot of the art he had up was literally taped (inside bags of course) to the wall and you didn't really have that opportunity so it wasn't as prominent. Of course the show was a lot smaller then so a prominent spot wasn't quite as critical, just helpful to show your wares better. Benno
  4. I just finished a super fun trade, but it was all small potatoes so no room for bruised egos. I am a big fan of preliminary art and that is often where I have the most fun with trades because its more about expanding the variety of artists that each of us have in our collections rather than how can I get something great for a lot less than I would pay in cash. The capper was "hey, I know you really liked this one, so why don't you take it too" followed by "That's so cool, thanks-why don't you pick one of these two for yourself then". A trade with low stakes between friends is my kind of two and a half hour Sunday lunch. Any preliminary art fans going to Heroes? Wanna have lunch and trade around a bit? Benno
  5. I got pencil copies of two complete Jimmy Olsen books by Kirby from Greg Theakston several years ago. Would be happy to trade one for some art if anyone is interested. Feel free to email me offline at benno119@gmail.com
  6. My understanding was that keeping the art was a specific part of the deal with Gaines-to the point that Frazetta wouldn't do covers for him and just loaned him the unused art for one of the Famous Funnies covers for WSF #29 with the proviso that he get the art back. I guess that idea was ingrained in those guys because I also understand that Harvey Kurtzman also kept all of the art for Humbug several years later and it was still in his estate when he died. No one saw the value of this stuff as being the art itself at that point in time-all of the value was in the ability to reprint the work for publication in the future. Only the rise of fan culture created the value we see today and that was long years away between 1950 to 1954 (though I suppose some EC fan-addicts might have dug getting a piece for free-I doubt many of them would have paid for it) and even in the early 60's as fandom just began to flourish. Honestly, if you asked those older guys, I think they would be unlikely to tell you that they wanted the art and were told they couldn't have it-I bet in many many cases, if publishers hadn't kept it, many of the artists might have tossed it themselves-likely for lack of storage. Of course when it turned out to have value, they certainly all wanted it and I think they deserved to get it.
  7. I can understand how Gene's choices of his favorite four reflect his love for those books, but my favorite image among them was "The Last Battle" I was also reminded a bit of "Yellow Submarine" art by some of the pieces-and though I pooh poohed the art here, I LOVE Yellow Submarine, so when I went back again and looked today I will admit to finding more charm in these pieces than I did the first time I looked. I bet this thread by itself has probably jumped the prices on some of these covers though-I certainly hadn't noticed them before.
  8. Odd, I have a ton of nostalgia for the books, but those covers don't really ring my chimes at all. I guess the art just isn't my cuppa tea to the point where the nostalgia isn't important enough. There are books from my childhood that I might be interested in getting art from, but I would have to really want to put it on my wall at this point and those covers don't quite meet that test. I saw some art from Charlotte's Web a while back and that gave me a really big jolt of nostalgia and envy at the thought of owning it. I might also be tempted by a Tom Swift Jr. Cover as that was my series of choice over Hardy Boys. I was amazed to later discover my father had been into the original Tom Swift books in the 30's when I saw some copies at my Grandparents that they had kept from his childhood.
  9. I'm not sold on the comic room approach with the swinging panels. Its a little to close to being like a comic shop with posters etc that are set up for review and sale. I am all about swapping out art all the time and showing off different stuff, but I like the aesthetic of my comic art being clearly "Art" with a capital A and this kind of display just doesn't say that to me, even if it allows more art to be shown in a small space.
  10. I know some folks make copies and frame them-I know of at least one artist who gets giglee's made of art he has collected and keeps the originals in a safety deposit at a bank. I just cant get my arms around that as a collector. The whole point to me is that the work I am looking at is the original. I don't think I could go with copies.
  11. I have several frames made by "Frame it Again Sam" who used to make these quick change frames, but has apparently retired. The tops pop off and the art is behind plexi, but inside the frame there is a pocket with a mylite and an acid free backing board. Perfect for modern size pieces and allows me to swap things out regularly. I have this four frame set up in my office and change it out every couple of months so I can look at different things. Currently up are a Risso Batman/Joker commission, a Question cover by Cowan/Sienkewicz, a Sandman commission by P. Craig Russell and a Silver Surfer cover recreation by Buscema of a cover that I used to own the original of. These have been up for a few weeks so I will probably swap them out around the beginning of May.
  12. I don't have all my eggs in one basket, but quite by accident, I have pieces that became a far larger share of the value of my collection than anticipated. I recently did some analysis for insurance and was somewhat surprised to find that 50% of the value of my collection was in the top 10% of the pieces (by total number) that I own. Some of that is because I have concentrated on preliminary art, both because I enjoy it quite a bit and also because I can afford it in a time of rapidly rising prices. I am also consciously trying to move away from the middle-buying things that are at the higher end of my budget and the lower end, but not having quite so much in the middle.
  13. Love this! Its hard to know when to gussy something up with an elaborate frame-good choice here.
  14. After reading this topic for several years with varying degrees of personal interest, I have finally determined that what makes an A-level Preacher page is that it must be a page that I own and which contains the characters I like most doing something that makes me happy. Under that completely objective criteria, I now have an A-level Preacher page on the way.
  15. Like others I would have to break this down between comic book and comic strip artists-similar, but absolutely not the same skill set. I would also add that Frank Frazetta could make both lists, but his work in both fields is dwarfed by his work as an illustrator and that is where his talent shined brightest. Comic books: 1. Will Eisner-His Spirit work was a master class for a huge number of cartoonists-and then he came back and wowed again with his late period graphic novels. He was a triple threat-writer, artist and incredible booster for the entire field of cartooning and what it could be. 2. Jack Kirby. The master of superhero cartooning-but his war and western and romance work was great too and if its possible to underrate the King, I think its possible he was. 3. Jack Davis -he could do it all and do it better than so many others. His ability to work in every facet of cartooning at the highest level hasn't really been matched in my opinion. 4. Robert Crumb. He let his Id run wild on paper and had the chops to make it the gold standard for underground art- and then just Art with a capital A. Of course Zap is great-but so is Genesis and all points in between. Comic Strips: I have to say I just love the big three of classic adventure strips(Foster, Raymond, Caniff) so its hard to divorce that from what should be a Mt Rushmore of Comic Strip artists. The field is bigger than adventure strips though, and obviously, they haven't stood the test of time as well as humor anyway, so all three can't make it on the list-but dammit, they should add some room for them all!! 1. Winsor McCay. A certified genius of the comic strip in my opinion. He started when cartoonists were still making the whole field up right out their heads and created surrealist landscapes that boggle the mind a century later. 2. Hal Foster. Nobody did it better and with the unbelievable consistency of Foster. His work was superb in the 30's and really just as superb in the late 60's and early 70's as he hit retirement, though collectors want the vintage stuff more. 3. Charles Schulz. I wanted to put Raymond here. I honestly would much rather own a classic Flash Gordon than a classic Peanuts Sunday-but if you are talking Mt. Rushmore of Comic Strips and you leave off Schulz, you are just fooling yourself and nobody else in my opinion. 4. Bill Watterson. In my mind, he created the greatest kid strip that could ever be made. Over the 10 years of Calvin & Hobbes he just got better and better til he hit a height so sublime it still floors me. I go back and read one of those paperback collections at least once a year and I am still bowled over.