markseifert

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About markseifert

  • Boards Title
    If you have a dream about out-posting me, you better wake up and apologize.

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  • Occupation
    creative director for Avatar Press
  • Hobbies
    fiction of all kinds, comics art and history
  • Location
    Rantoul, IL

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  1. markseifert

    Ho Ho Ho, bring on the Christmas covers

    Let's see how close he got in the 1845-era depiction...
  2. markseifert

    Batman #1 Club

    Jump on youtube and look for "reaction" videos to developing events in the various WB/DC tv shows (to name one example). Something pretty fascinating is happening... kids who didn't read it in the comics first, are locked in on details of historical continuity (or as it's called these days -- 'canon' ) and even relatively minor characters to an extent that you wouldn't believe. This due to the way current media echoes the original material. [this aside from the notion that the numbers of the past few years have not generally indicated a narrowing industry -- according to comichron, for example, 2015 top 300 sales were +8% vs.2014, +29% vs.2010, +17% vs. 2015, +29% vs. 2000. We could debate what exactly that means all day I'm sure, but it's beside my point here except to say... generally speaking, the world is still producing new comic book fans] In any case, millennials who are absorbing canon via other media ARE generally showing the same sort of interest in how it all fits together as 'we' comic book readers did as kids. One interesting part of that is that they'll often try to find out what happened in the original comic book version so they can speculate on what might happen in the media version. This plays out every day on social media in a variety of ways. Another example is in reactions to cast announcements. When an actor is rumored to have a role in a comic book film, speculation runs wild as to what character that actor might be playing. Vague rumors and descriptions are poured over to see how they might match to the original comic book material. The same goes for -script rumors. Even the release of a single movie still image can have fans speculating like crazy on how it might relate to the original material. It's just as fun for these fans to learn how the history all fits together as it was for us in the day. Frankly, probably moreso, and they have a _lot_ more incentive to do it because of the atmosphere that social media creates. As to how this will translate into the desire to buy old paper far into the future, I couldn't say, but... interest in the history is still very, very strong. It's just manifesting itself in different ways than it used to.
  3. markseifert

    Bat 1 Larson Copy CC 8.0 How Much?

    Seems like a soft price....bad time of the year to be a seller seems like the summer time is the best (or late spring). Good buy for the winner that is for sure. The end of "major auction" season (traditionally mid to late Nov) and beginning of season (Feb / early Mar) have historically been very, very good for Heritage and Comicconnect. If you look at the data, there have been loads of records set at those points of the cycle. This is a week or two later than usual (I think?) for CC though, and once you get into Dec, record pace does drop pretty notably.
  4. Did someone say it was... DOOMSDAY?
  5. markseifert

    Some very early Everett work here..

    I actually think that's a pretty interesting question. Another aspect of this is that a couple of the family helped run what was basically America's first widely-read literary review magazine. A super-cool tidbit is that Edward's son William (would have been Bill's great-uncle, I believe) wrote an important article about the spread and rapidly increasing popularity of the cheap newsstand fiction of the day, the dime novel. He's basically being enthusiastic about the dawn of popular cheap newsstand fiction, when many other literary figures were dismissive of it. That article is very widely cited in the history of American popular fiction. Kind of a cool tie-in to the future that Bill's era represented.
  6. markseifert

    Some very early Everett work here..

    Yep, Everett went on for two hours -- he was considered one of the great orators of the time. Then Lincoln's short, sharp, memorable moment. Made it all the more powerful in contrast.
  7. 153 years ago today, Bill Everett's great grandfather gave a speech in Gettysburg, PA. After he was done, the man standing next to him in the photo above began his own speech with "Four score and seven years ago today..." History doesn't remember Bill's great grandad all that much -- certainly he's overshadowed by the fellow standing next to him at the moment in the photo -- but he left a family legacy that included two state governors, presidents of Harvard, other noteworthy officials. Nephew of his wrote "Man Without A Country". And so on. And then there's great grandson Bill, helping to found the American comic book industry. Something special in that bloodline.
  8. markseifert

    Have a Cigar! Golden Age only....!

    Marvel 1 - Oct/Nov '39 First Martan the Marvel Man - Dec '39 First Capt Marvel - Feb '40 It was a marvelous world, at least for a little while.
  9. You might be right, but I don't think they are any sort of proof copies or office files -- these (meaning, specifically the DC ga books with this particular style of "sample copy" stamp) have always felt a little too common for that to me. Not that they are incredibly common, but you do see them. Don't think they are "checking copies" either. [copies sent to advertisers as proof of ad placement] I wonder if they are copies sent out to prospective advertisers, things of that nature. Could also be example copies sent out to other publishers as examples of quality of the printing work (or perhaps that's what you meant to begin with). Printers don't send their competitors sample work. Yeah, they do. I get them all the time,. [edit -- again, being clear -- talking about a situation where a printer might send Marvel, Fawcett, Fiction House, etc, etc copies of recent DC's they've done as examples of quality, to stump for business. That is extremely common to see from a pub's perspective. The printer sales rep would still call those 'samples' in modern times, come to think of it, so... ]
  10. markseifert

    Wonder WOmen #1 CGC 9.0 on ComicConnect

    Yeah, man, the #1 and #2 are shock and awe books if you're interested in provenance and the history of the business. Incredible. The whole Lasry collection is amazing, obviously, particularly if you're a DC ga fan.
  11. You might be right, but I don't think they are any sort of proof copies or office files -- these (meaning, specifically the DC ga books with this particular style of "sample copy" stamp) have always felt a little too common for that to me. Not that they are incredibly common, but you do see them. Don't think they are "checking copies" either. [copies sent to advertisers as proof of ad placement] I wonder if they are copies sent out to prospective advertisers, things of that nature. Could also be example copies sent out to other publishers as examples of quality of the printing work (or perhaps that's what you meant to begin with).
  12. markseifert

    What are the rarest romance comics?

    Whoa. Nice copy of a great book.
  13. markseifert

    GOLD CONNECTIONS

    From forgotten Westerns to a classic with Bacall:
  14. markseifert

    GOLD CONNECTIONS

    From Brownies to Cookie:
  15. markseifert

    GOLD CONNECTIONS

    From Russia with to Love.