Zonker

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  1. I haven't been around much lately, all is well, just life keeping me busy. Occasionally though a comics thought occurs to me that would make for a good old school CGC Forum discussion, and not too long ago, I came across this Denny O'Neil quote looking back on the introduction of Ras al Ghul : At the time, I thought that was somewhat interesting, maybe all those Batman murder mysteries and gothic tales I remember fondly from the early 1970s were written just because O'Neil didn't know any better? But that cannot be right, there was a large period of time from mid-1969 to the 1973 re-introduction of the Joker in Batman #251, when the Batman costumed villains just didn't appear at all, no matter who was scripting. Within the next dozen issues of #251, Catwoman, Scarecrow, the Penguin and the Riddler all would return, but prior to that point, we hadn't seen Catwoman since Batman #210, the Joker since Detective #389 and Scarecrow since Detective #390, all in the first half of 1969. The primary new adversaries introduced, memorably so, during the 1969-1973 period were Ras al Ghul and Man-Bat. And a couple of old-time villains (Two-Face in Batman #234 and Dr. Tzin-Tzin in Detective #408) made return appearances in this time. But while each of these antagonists had an exotic visual appearance, none of them really presented as a traditional costumed super-villain. And it wasn't just an O'Neil thing, the trend started 6 months before he arrived in Detective Comics #395, and was consistent between his stories and those written during the same period by Frank Robbins and others. It even extended beyond the Julie Schwartz editorial office, as I don't think there were any traditional costumed Batman villains in Brave & Bold or World's Finest during this period either. Certainly DC was trying to distance itself from the Batman TV show during that time, but the comics stories had already started to get more serious (less "camp") by 1968, prior to the villains being banished. So.. Was there something more to the disappearance of the costumed villains during mid 1969- mid 1973? Have I overlooked any classic Bat-villain appearances during this period? Any favorites among the non-costumed villains? (not expecting to find any closet fans of the Ten-Eyed Man, but I always thought Colonel Sulphur had potential!)
  2. Sword of Sorcery Complete Run Currently listed as a 10-day auction, but happy to accept reasonable offers. Very early work by Walt Simonson, Howard Chaykin & Jim Starlin. Sword of Sorcery #1 Mike Kaluta draws the cover. Inside Denny O'Neil adapts Leiber's story "The Price of Pain Ease." Pencil artwork is by a young Howard Chaykin. Inks in this issue and most following are by a group of artists collectively known as the Crusty Bunkers, essentially whoever was in Neal Adams' studio at the time. Very Good / Fine: structurally this is much nicer, but there is some mild foxing staining around the edges of the back cover. Sword of Sorcery #2 The cover is penciled by Chaykin and inked by Bernie Wrightson. In this issue O'Neil adapts Leiber's story "Thieves' House" as "Revenge of the Skull of Jewels." Chaykin provides the interior pencil artwork. Fine condition: pages tanned. Hint of a color-breaking crease near the top right corner of the front cover, slight tanning around the edges of the back cover. Sword of Sorcery #3 Cover and interior pencils by Chaykin. The story "Betrayal" is apparently a Denny O'Neil original. Fine condition: there is a tiny colr-breaking crease at the lower right corner of the front cover. Sword of Sorcery #4 Cover by Howard Chaykin. The story is Denny O'Neil's adaptation of Leiber's "The Cloud of Hate." Chaykin Inc is credited with the interior artwork, and it is possible that Walt Simonson penciled several of the pages uncredited. Regardless, Simonson pencilled & inked the second story, an original Fafhrd short story by Denny O'Neil. This issue is in Fine/Very Fine condition. Very slight ink transfer staining on the back cover. Sword of Sorcery #5 Cover by Walt Simonson, who also penciled the interior artwork for O'Neil's adaptation of the Fritz Leiber story "The Sunken Land." The second story is an original Gray Mouser short story written by George Effinger and penciled by Jim Starlin. Al Milgrom inked each of the two stories in this issue. Fine/Very Fine condition.
  3. Big Lot of 50 DC Comics from the 1970s-1980s. FREE SHIPPING within the USA 1 Action Comics #535 early Omega Men crossover. Air Wave backup story. Fine Plus condition: slight crease lower right corner of the front cover, 25 cent price stamped on back cover. 2 Action Comics #536 Omega Men with the New Teen Titans cameo. Aquaman backup story. Very Fine. 3 Adventure Comics #447 Cover and interior Aquaman art by Jim Aparo, with a backup story featuring the Creeper. Fine condition, slight ink transfer along the spine of the back cover. 4 Adventure Comics #465 Dollar Comic format. Deadman, Flash, Aquaman with Don Newton art and the Justice Society of America. Fine / Very Fine condition. 5 Adventure Comics #466 Last Dollar Comic format. Jim Aparo cover. Mike Nasser Flash story. Tells the story of the final Golden Age Justice Society adventure. Fine Plus. 6 Adventure Comics #469 Plastic Man and Starman origin part 1 by Steve Ditko. Fine condition. 7 Adventure Comics #470 Plastic Man and Starman origin part 2 by Steve Ditko. Fine condition: creases on the back cover. 8 All-Star Squadron #9 cover by Joe Kubert. Fine/Very Fine. 9 All-Star Squadron #11 WWII adventures of the Justice Society & comrades. Joe Kubert cover. Hitler & FDR appear. Very Fine. 10 All-Star Squadron #12 more WWII with the JSA. Joe Kubert cover. Very Fine. 11 All-Star Comics #64 Wally Wood cover & interior art. Fine condition: "30" is pencilled on center top edge of the back cover 12 Brave & Bold #130 Jim Aparo art. Green Arrow, the Atom, Joker & Two-Face appear. Fine Plus: 25 written at the midpoint of the top edge of the back cover. 13 Brave & Bold #173 co-starring Batman & the Guardians of the Universe. Cover & interior art by Jim Aparo. Fine condition: faint color-breaking creases at the lower right corner of the front cover. 14 Brave & Bold #176 Batman & the Legion of Super-Heroes. Very Fine. 15 DC Comics Presents #36 Superman & Starman, cover and interior art by Jim Starlin. Fine / Very Fine condition. 16 Detective Comics #480 written by Denny O'Neil, interior art by Don Newton on Batman and Murphy Anderson on Hawkman. Cover by Jim Aparo. Very Fine condition. 17 Dynamic Classics #1 reprints Neal Adams' Batman from Detective Comics #395 and Walt Simonson's Manhunter from Detective Comics #437. Fine Minus condition: edge wear and back cover soiling. 18 Green Lantern #150. Fine Minus condition, tanned pages, wear around the edges. 19 Green Lantern Corps #220 Gil Kane cover & art. Fine Plus condition. 20 Hercules Unbound #3 Wally Wood inks. Fine condition. 21 Hercules Unbound #6 Wally Wood inks. Very Good / Fine condition: vertical crease front cover. 22 Hercules Unbound #7 Walt Simonson & Wally Wood art. Fine / Very Fine. tanning around the edges. 23 Hercules Unbound #8 Walt Simonson & Wally Wood art. Fine condition: wear around the edges, tanning. 24 Justice League of America #142 Part of Steve Englehart's JLA run featuring his DC counterpart to The Avengers' Mantis, here known as "Willow." Fine condition: slight color-breaking crease at upper right corner of the front cover. 25 Justice League of America #165 Death of Zatanna's mother. Fine/Very Fine 26 Justice League of America #188 Hanukkah story. Very Fine 27 Justice League of America #190 Brian Bolland cover. Fine Plus condition: several spine ticks. 28 Kamandi #9 written & penciled by Jack Kirby. Very Fine Minus condition. 29 Mister Miracle #23 written by Steve Gerber, interior art by Michael Golden. Cover by Marshall Rogers. Very Fine condition. 30 Mister Miracle Special #1 cover & interior art by Steve Rude. Fine condition: color breaks at the lower right corner of the front cover and the upper left corner of the back. 31 New Teen Titans #6 (1981, first series) Marv Wolfman & George Perez. Fine condition: spine & edge wear. 32 New Teen Titans #37 (1983, first series) Marve Wolfman & George Perez. Guest-starring the Outsiders. VF/NM. 33 Secret Society of Super-Villains #4. Very Fine. 34 Shade the Changing Man #3 Steve Ditko story & art. Fine/Very Fine condition. Number "30" written in pencil at the top right corner of the back cover. 35 Stalker #3 Steve Ditko pencils, Wally Wood inks. Fine condition: slight color break near top right corner front cover. 36 Strange Adventures #243 reprints Carmine Infantino's Adam Strange from Mystery in Space #83, and a Murphy Anderson story from Strange Adventures #131. Fine Plus condition: there is a hard crease at the lower right corner of the front cover that does not break color, but does go throughout the book. 37 Superboy & the Legion of Super-Heroes #203 First Mike Grell issue. Nick Cardy cover. Very Good / Fine condition: color-breaking creases lower right corner of the front cover. 38 Superboy & the Legion of Super-Heroes #238 Jim Starlin wraparound cover. Reprints Adventure Comics #359-#360 by Jim Shooter, Curt Swan & George Klein. Fine Plus condition. 39 Superboy & the Legion of Super-Heroes #241 Jim Sherman art. Earthwar saga begins. Fine condition: slight spine wear. 40 Superboy & the Legion of Super-Heroes #243 Mike Grell cover. Earthwar saga. Fine Minus: slight chipping top edge of the back cover. 41 Superboy & the Legion of Super-Heroes #250 Jim Starlin art (as "Steve Apollo") Fine Minus: discoloration around the edges of the back cover. 42 Superman #277. Fine condition: thin color-breaking creases lower right section of the front cover. 43 Superman #312 Curt Swan art. Fine Plus condition. 44 Superman #313 Curt Swan art, Neal Adams cover inks. Fine condition: color break at top right corner of the front cover. 45 Superman #314 Curt Swan art, Neal Adams cover inks. Fine Minus condition: wear at the corners. 46 Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #158 Nick Cardy cover. Fine condition, color breaks on the back cover. 47 Tarzan #208 2nd DC issue, Giant sized. Joe Kubert cover, story & interior artwork. Gray Morrow art on the John Carter of Mars back-up feature. Fine condition: there is a hard crease on the back cover. 48 Teen Titans #34 Nick Cardy cover and interior inks. Fine Minus condition. Color-breaking creases run vertically up the spine. 49 Warlord #14 cover, story & interior artwork by Mike Grell. Fine condition: slight spine roll. 50 Warlord #28 written and penciled by Mike Grell. Fine condition: mild spine wear.
  4. Put me down for #174 as the "first." The cover announces the new direction, even if the interior contents didn't really deliver (that happens a lot, of course!) Kind of like the 1970 re-launch of All-Star Western Comics: That first issue is all reprints, then the 2nd issue has the introduction of El Diablo (Gray Morrow art) and the beginning of the short-lived Outlaw series (Tony DeZuniga art). Or the re-launch of the Phantom Stranger series, where the title starts out mostly reprinting the 1950s stories, then gradually evolves to all-new stories, with Neal Adams art and the classic Adams-inspired Jim Aparo run.
  5. Every now and then I'll come across something cool that pertains to the themes in this old thread, and I'll post it here. Found this one on the Jack Kirby Museum Website and it touches a couple of the bases already mentioned here: Kirby's ambitions for his Fourth World series and the value DC publisher Carmine Infantino saw in the perceived "prestige" of the Green Lantern / Green Arrow series, even if the sales were not all that great! Enjoy! Originally published in the fanzine Comic & Crypt from 1971 =================================================================================================================================== C&C: What led you into becoming Editorial Director? Infantino: An accident. I was drawing here. I think I was drawing the BATMAN and DEADMAN. It was during that story that the second guy at MARVEL was slaughtering NATIONAL. I think his name was Kirby or something, and the gentleman who happened to be in charge at the time asked me if I would care to stop in and help re-organize. We discussed it and I finally did. I thought it would be interesting. C&C: Well you tried the new trend books. They failed but I had them all and I thought they had possibilities, especially BATLASH. Infantino: In BATLASH what bothered me the most was that I wrote it. I plotted every one of them and Sergio took it from there and wrote them down. Then Denny would dialogue them later. C&C: When a friend of mine met Mr. Weisinger, he was told by him not to go into comics; that it was a dying field. He told him rather to go into painting, and to get out of comics. (This was about five years ago – MS) Kirby: You should have told him not I’m to knock anything he hasn’t tried. C&C: Was that the type of attitude that was around then? Infantino: No. I think it was a personal attitude. C&C: Has the atmosphere changed? Are new ideas welcome? Kirby: It’s a different company today. If a company feels that there is an essential need somewhere they get the right executive to fill that need. In other words, to expedite that need. You use that need to revitalize the company. Comics are in a transition, as far as I see it. I think this is the most interesting time for comics. C&C: How long have you had the idea for the NEW GODS? Kirby: Well, I guess for several years it’s probably been in the back of my mind, but I’ve never sat down and worked it out though I’ve always known it’s been there. C&C: Do FOREVER PEOPLE come from the same place as the NEW GODS? Kirby: Yes, but they don’t call the things you see the same things that I do. In other words, I would say great or swell, and you guys would say cool. It’s not New Genesis to them, it’s Supertown. That’s how they see it. There is, though, a lot more to it than that and I think you guys are going to find it pretty interesting. C&C: According to the sales, the superhero book is on the rocks. Kirby: I pay attention to the sales occasionally only because I plot the books, and sometimes the sales are my only link with the fans. I feel that the superhero surf is going somewhere. What I’m trying to do is follow its exact trail; that’s my job. I want to entertain you guys and find something new for you – if not just for you, for myself – the challenge of my job is to keep me from getting bored. I feel that if I would want to buy my own book, I have met that challenge. C&C: The themes in NEW GODS and FOREVER PEOPLE are expansions of the old themes from MARVEL. It seems that you had more ideas, but they wouldn’t let you continue with them. Kirby: That’s more or less true. It’s not that I was cramped, but there were limitations which stopped me from going on. Over here I have the chance to go beyond them; I feel. that whatever story there is to this “gods” business, the “new” Gods or the “old” Gods, I feel. that there is a story to them. I feel that there was an actual replacement of the “old” Gods by new ones which are relevant to what we see and hear. In other words, Thor may have been great in medieval times, but I feel, somehow, that we have transcended. Once it had a certain glamour, but now we need a new kind of glamour. Not that it isn’t fantastic, but we don’t see it in the same light anymore. I think we see things differently, the same things with an altered interpretation. You know what Thor looked like, what Mercury looked like, what Zeus looked like, and all the rest of them. It’s like everything that’s done and seen. What I’m trying to do is show the things that haven’t been done or seen. Kirby: We have our “new” GOD today – technology. A new way at looking at things that I have got to represent. How do I represent that new technology? I’ve got Metron. How do I represent the kind of feelings we have today? Maybe some of us are analyzing ourselves, trying to find out why we’re a violent society and how we could be nonviolent, so we all become Orion. Why do these feelings live like that inside of us? Not only do we associate ourselves with them, but these are conflicts. But why do we have conflicts like that inside of us? So we try to analyze it, just like Orion does. That’s what the GODS are. They are just representations of ourselves. At that time, you take a crummy Viking, remove the glamour, and what the heck was he? Some poor guy in bear skins, who never took a bath. He had a beard with lice in it and he says: “Look at me, I’m a really cruddy object.” And I felt the same way. The GIs feel the same way sometimes when they’re sitting in some hole but suddenly he says: “What the heck am I doing? What am I a symbol of?” And then he begins to idealize the version of all the bravery that goes into the fight. Maybe he begins to see himself as Thor and his captain as Odin. Then he sees what he’s fighting for. He sees why he’s in that hole, why he’s in the dirt, why he’s dressed in that stupid uniform. It’s not only functional – it’s symbolic of what he is; he comes into a whole new world and he feels pretty good about it. That’s what it’s all about. To make everything we see and know around and in us, and give it some meaning. Kirby: And the GODS are nothing more than that. They are making us see some value in us and we have ­ we have that value. So in order to express that value, we make “new” GODS. We can’t be Thor. We can’t be Odin, anymore. We’re not a bunch of guys running around in bear skins; we’re guys that wear spacesuits and surgeon’s masks. A surgeon is godlike because he handles life and death. If you want to idealize him that’s the way to do it. A nuclear physicist is Metron. A mathematician is Metron. A guy who works a projection booth in a theater is Metron. He’s involved in technology. We’re trying to know everything and we’ve got the equipment to do it. That’s where Metron’s chair comes in. It’s one of our gadgets. That damn chair can do anything! C&C: There is so much meaning in the strip. I read it and I enjoyed it but I couldn’t place all these things into it, but it’s there. Kirby: It’s there because I’m trying to interpret us. Nothing more than that. I’m trying to interpret what we’re in. What kind of times we live in. And we should have these versions. I can see this guy in a spacesuit. There is no reason why he shouldn’t be able to go to Mars. Maybe in ’75. Because we can do it. The materials are there. They’ll be common. And to put it all in one word that’s Metron. And New Genesis. You name it. That’s New York or Chicago; just an idealized version of that. It’s the city. C&C: Did you ever mention this to MARVEL? Kirby: No. I was involved in what I was doing there and I feel that this would never have fit into what they were doing. This is a whole new interpretation and it cannot be told with shields and swords; it must be done with what we know and deal with what we worry about. C&C: So was THOR; when it came out as a mythology in the olden times it was relevant and real to the people then, because people were using the same things: swords, shields, etc. Kirby: Yes, THOR was very real to the guy in the middle ages and not only that if you think about it; THOR was a religion as well. THOR is not a comic book story – Norse mythology was a religion, just as Greek mythology was. I was being superficial when I did THOR and if I showed it to a guy who was really involved with it he would tell me it wasn’t good enough. C&C: Why? Kirby: Suppose I was to make an interpretation of things you really believed in. It would be weak because those things are on such a grandiose scale, I can’t draw them. ============================================================================= C&C: Who got the idea for the Neal Adams GREEN LANTERN book? The sales are dropping. I know they went up and now they’re dropping a little bit. I don’t know how true it is. Infantino: Who said that? C&C: Neal Adams. I heard that you are keeping it for prestige. I’d like to know how it got started. Infantino: The GREEN LANTERN was ready to be turned out when we were told to drop it. Even though I wanted a few more issues. I said to Julie: “There’s something you wanted to try.” I want this book as different as you could possibly make it. We sat down with Denny and came out with it. The book was slowly rising. It went real high at one point. Then it sagged off again. If this book can give to us the public relations, if it can take this business and give us the solid citizen reputation it should have not been considered junk, as it used to be. It will be worth everything we are putting into it.
  6. Neal Adams and Denny O'Neil started their Batman run with "The Secret of the Waiting Graves" in Detective Comics #395 (cover dated January 1970) Together and separately, O'Neil & Adams did some of my all-time favorite Batman stories including Detective #397, #400, #402, #404, #405, #406, #407, #408, #410, #411, #414, #418, #425 and Batman #219, #224, #225, #227, #232, #234, #235, #237, #240, #241, #242, #243, #244, #245, #251, #253, #255. Before that, the Neal Adams Bat era really began with Brave & Bold #79-86. O'Neil & Adams also did B&B #93. Also worth checking out is Detective #437-#443 from 1974, Archie Goodwin's brief editorship of Detective Comics, when it became a precursor to the Legends of the Dark Knight series of 15 years later.
  7. Hey Mikey! Typo on the name. It was John Calnan. Here is his obit
  8. I LOVE the fact this thread is so old that greggy is here commenting in complete sentences on the actual contents of a comic book! And, for the record, I called out Conan #24 The Song of Red Sonja back in September 2002.
  9. Frank Miller! David Mazzucchelli! Alan Moore! Gene Colan! Don Newton! Norm Breyfogle! J. Michael Straczynski! Paul Dini! 15 Copper to Modern Age Batman Books Detective Comics #503. Jim Starlin cover. Book length story with Batman, Robin & Batgirl versus the Scarecrow. Very Fine Minus condition: some mild color loss and/or ink transfer around the edges of the front and back covers. Detective Comics #516 - Don Newton art. Batgirl back up story. Very Fine condition: just some minor spine tick marks. Detective Comics #517: Gene Colan/Tony DeZuniga art. Batgirl back up story. Very Fine condition: there is some non-color-breaking creasing at the lower left corner of the back cover. Batman Annual #8 - Trevor von Eeden artwork & painted cover. Ras al Ghul and Talia appear. Fine condition: some wear around the edges. Batman Annual #11 - Alan Moore story featuring Clayface III, with George Freeman artwork. Very Fine condition. Batman #406 is written by Frank Miller, with art by David Mazzucchelli. It is Part 3 of the Year One storyline. Fine / Very Fine condition: Primary defect is a very slight bend (non-color-breaking) along the top edge of the comic. Detective Comics #590 An American Batman in London. Story by John Wagner & Alan Grant. Art by Norm Breyfogle. Very Fine condition: tiny color-breaking crease at the lower left corner of the back cover. Detective Comics #614 Story by Alan Grant. Art by Norm Breyfogle & Steve Mitchell. Fine/Very Fine condition: minor wear at the upper right corner of the front cover. Adventures of Superman #467 "Dark Knight Over Metropolis" guest-starring the Batman. Written & penciled by Dan Jurgens, with finished ink art by Art Thibert. Very Fine / Near Mint condition. Minor spine tick marks Batman #465 Official roll-out of Tim Drake as the new Robin. Story by Alan Grant, art by Norm Breyfogle & Steve Mitchell. Near Mint Minus condition. Detective Comics #654 Sam Kieth cover. Story by Chuck Dixon, art by Mike Netzer & Scott Hanna. VF/NM condition. Detective Comics #783 Death and the Maidens preview by Greg Rucka & Klaus Janson. Ras al Ghul appears. VF/NM condition. Detective Comics #843 Story by Paul Dini. Art by Dustin Nguyen & Derek Fridolfs. Zatanna appears.Near Mint condition. The Brave & the Bold #27 Batman & Dial H for Hero. Story by J. Michael Straczynski, art by Jesus Saiz. Near Mint Minus condition. Detective Comics #868 The Joker appears. Story by David Hine. Art by Scott McDaniel & Andy Owens. Near Mint condition.
  10. 12 Jack Kirby Fourth World comics: New Gods, Forever People, Mister Miracle, Jimmy Olsen NOW SOLD! From 1971-1974: A lot of 12 original Jack Kirby "Fourth World" comics chronicling the behind-the-scenes war on Earth between the forces of Darkseid's Apokolips and Highfather's New Genesis. All the comics are complete. All covers and pages held together by the original staples. No water damage. Average condition is Fine, details noted below. In this lot you get: Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #137 featuring the New Newsboy Legion. Fine condition: minor wear around the edges, and a mild vertical crease on the front cover that barely breaks color in a few spots. Forever People #2 Darkseid appears. First appearances of Mantis and Desaad. Fine condition: a 1/4 inch spine split at the bottom of the spine and a couple of other nicks along the spine. Forever People #4 Darkseid appears. First appearance of Sonny Sumo. Also features a Golden Age Simon & Kirby Sandman reprint from Adventure Comics #85 (1943). Fine condition: several spine stresses, very slight spine roll. New Gods #4 features Orion, Metron, Black Racer, Highfather and Darkseid. Also included are pin-up page illustrations of Lightray and Kalibak. Featured as well in this issue is a Golden Age Simon & Kirby reprint starring Manhunter from Adventure Comics #73 (1942). Fine Plus condition: there is a 1/4 inch tear near the upper left corner of the back cover. Forever People #5 The Forever People meet "Sunny Sumo." Darkseid makes a cameo appearance. The other new story in this issue features the first appearance of Lonar. Also included in this issue is a Golden Age Simon & Kirby Sandman reprint from Adventure Comics #84 (1943). Fine condition: a small color-breaking crease at the lower right corner of the front cover and some minor soiling along the lower edge of the back cover. Forever People #6 Darkseid appearance, first use of the Omega Effect. Also features a Golden Age Simon & Kirby Sandman reprint from Adventure Comics #75 (1942). Fine condition: minor wear along the bottom edge of the back cover. Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #147 features a Neal Adams cover. The Jack Kirby story "A Superman in Supertown" follows the Man of Steel as he takes a Boom Tube to New Genesis and meets Highfather. This storyline is a follow-up to Kirby's story from Forever People #1 where Superman gets his first look at Supertown. Also features a Golden Age Simon & Kirby Newsboy Legion reprint from Star-Spangled Comics #13 (1942). Very Good / Fine condition: there is a 1/2 inch horizontal tear at the midpoint of the left edge of the back cover. New Gods #10 Forager & Mantis appear. Fine condition: tiny color flecks out front & back covers. (See the letter E in the New Gods front cover logo.) Mister Miracle #11 with appearances by Barda, Oberon, and the Female Furies. Fine condition, with minor pen markings on the front cover Mister Miracle #15 First appearance Shilo Norman. Very Good / Fine condition: the color-breaking crease at the lower right corner of the front cover actually goes all the way through the book. Mister Miracle #16 with Barda, Oberon and Shilo Norman. Fine Minus condition: slight color-breaking creases at the lower right corner of the front cover. Mister Miracle #17 with Barda and Shilo Norman. Fine condition, slight wear around the edges.
  11. Batman Family 17-20 - Michael Golden issues NOW SOLD! From 1978, the final four Batman Family issues. Average condition is Fine. In this lot you get: Batman Family 17 Mike Kaluta cover. Jim Aparo art on the Batman story. Huntress guest-stars. Great 20-page teamup between Man-Bat and Kirby's Demon, Etrigan, drawn by Michael Golden. Fine Minus condition- mild wear around the edges, particularly the upper edge of the front cover. Batman Family 18 Mike Kaluta cover. Batman story illustrated by Michael Golden and P. Craig Russell. Huntress solo series begins. Fine Plus condition: note the slightly faded color along the left edge of the front cover (at the spine). Batman Family 19 Mike Kaluta cover. Batman story illustrated by Michael Golden and P. Craig Russell. Very Good condition: there is a tear at the lower right corner of the front cover. Batman Family 20 Jim Starlin wraparound cover. Batman story illustrated by Michael Golden, featuring a cross-over by Ragman. Golden also contributes the art to a Man-Bat story that features a Batman cameo and a re-appearance of old Batman supporting character Jason Bard. Fine condition- there is a thin hard crease at the upper right corner of the front cover.
  12. 9 DCs from 1966-1970s NOW SOLD! A lot of late-1960s, early 1970s Silver to Bronze Age transition issues. Each of these have certain problems keeping them out of high grade, so consider them readers copies only. Showcase #65 featuring the Inferior Five. Written by E. Nelson Bridwell, drawn by Mike Sekowsky. Very Good / Fine condition: minor wear around the edges. Adventure Comics #359 featuring Superboy and the Legion of Super-Heroes. "The Outcast Legion" is written by Jim Shooter and drawn by Curt Swan and George Klein. Very Good condition: staples have some rust, and some transfer to the paper at the centerfold Secret Six #3. Written by E. Nelson Bridwell, drawn by Jack Sparling. Very Good / Fine condition: color-breaking creases at the lower right corner and upper right corner of the front cover. Bat Lash #1 written by Denny O'Neil & Sergio Aragones, with art & cover by Nick Cardy. Very Good condition: wear around the edges, pages and back cover are tanned. This is a subscription copy, with the characteristic lengthwise crease running vertically on the back cover. Metal Men #37 written and drawn by Mike Sekowsky. Good / Very Good condition: pen marking on front cover, color-breaking creases at the bottom right corner of the front cover, a 3/4 inch spine split starting from the lower left corner. Challengers of the Unknown #75 written by Denny O'Neil, and drawn by Jack Sparling. Joe Kubert cover. Very Good Plus condition: color-breaking crease at the lower right corner of the front cover. Slight discoloration of the staples. Showcase #85 featuring the first appearance of Firehair, written and drawn by Joe Kubert. Very Good condition: color-breaking creases at the lower right corner of the front cover. Spine wear. There is a 1 inch tear near on the top edge of the back cover. Teen Titans #25 written by Bob Kanigher and drawn by Nick Cardy. Very Good Plus condition: wear along the spine & a color-breaking crease at the top left corner of the back cover. Star-Spangled War Stories #150 featuring Enemy Ace written by Bob Kanigher and drawn by Joe Kubert. Fine Minus: there is some tanning around the edges
  13. SOLD! Jack Kirby's Fourth World Sampler: Forever People, New Gods, Mister Miracle & Jimmy Olsen! First appearances of Desaad, Mantis, Kanto, Forager & Himon. Plus Golden Age Simon & Kirby reprints in 4 of these Giant sized issues. From 1971-1974: A lot of 9 original Jack Kirby "Fourth World" comics chronicling the behind-the-scenes war on Earth between the forces of Darkseid's Apokolips and Highfather's New Genesis. All the comics are complete. All covers and pages held together by the original staples. No water damage, no staining. Forever People #2 Darkseid appears. First appearance Mantis. First appearance Desaad. Very Good / Fine condition: some mild color-breaking creasing on the front cover. Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #144 The Newsboy Legion takes on the Loch Ness Monster. Also features a Golden Age Simon & Kirby Newsboy Legion reprint from Star-Spangled Comics #10 (1942). Fine condition: very slight spine roll, tiny color-breaking crease at the lower right corner of the front cover. Mister Miracle #7 First appearance Kanto. Also features a Golden Age Simon & Kirby Boy Commandos reprint from Boy Commandos #3 (1943). Fine condition: some discoloration around the edges. Superman's Pal Jimmy Olsen #148 Neal Adams cover. Final Jack Kirby issue. Also features a Golden Age Simon & Kirby Newsboy Legion reprint from Star-Spangled Comics #14 (1942). Fine condition: tanning around the edges. New Gods #9 First appearance of Forager (Bug). Also features a Golden Age Simon & Kirby Manhunter reprint from Adventure Comics #78 (1942). Very Good Plus condition: there are non-color-breaking vertical bends on this comic, from the comic being folded lengthwise at some point in its prior life. Mister Miracle #9 Darkseid appears. The origin of Scott (Mister Miracle) Free. First appearance of Himon. Fine condition: there is a 1/4 inch tear near the lower right corner of the front cover. New Gods #10 "Earth-- the Doomed Dominion!" Fine condition: slight spine roll, some ballpoint pen writing at the upper left corner of the back cover. New Gods #11 Darkseid appears. Deaths of Kalibak and Desaad. Final Jack Kirby issue. Fine Plus condition. Mister Miracle #17 "Murder Lodge" with Barda & Shilo Norman. Fine Minus condition: slight wear around the edges.