CDNComix

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  1. I was tongue-and-cheek with the movie prediction. But I do believe that the release of that movie will spike it up. Who of a certain age doesn't like Scooby?
  2. And the upcoming movie in 2020 will definitely rocket it past Hulk #181 in a few years.
  3. Fit to be Tied Published by: self-published; Contributors: Jim Valentino; Diane Prosperi Valentino and various members of her family; Date: 1981; Price: free commemorative; Page count: 12 pages; Size: digest; (5.5 x 8.5); Kennedy #: 741; Print information: one printing; 150 copies; Like Curt Metz's Amabolis Insania (shown in the first few pages of this thread), Fit to be Tied was produced to commemorate the marriage of an underground/newave artist to their beloved: Jim Valentino to Diane Prosperi. Unlike Amabolis Insania, there is no fancy gold embossing or specialty print stock used to produce Fit to be Tied. It was imply was unnecessary, because after reading it you can tell that both the bride and groom were (and probably are) deeply in love.
  4. Holy Sh*t! Published by: Non-Organization Comics; Contributors: unknown; Date: 1980; Price: one dollar fifty cents; Page count: 28 pages; Size: comic; (6.5 x 10.0); Kennedy #: 993; Print information: unknown; I first I saw and became of the existence of this publication until it appeared on-line sale on-line about 2 years ago. I did not end-up winning that copy but managed to find another since. Holy Sh*t is listed in the Kennedy Guide, but I guess I just skimmed over it for years. The colour front cover is silk-screened which is unfortunate for trying to ball-park how many were printed. Colour litho print orders for undergrounds usually had a minimum of 500 - 1,000 copies, if not more. While some silkscreen runs can number as low the dozens.
  5. Fresh Comix #1 Published by: self-published; Contributors: Topper Helmer; Bruce "Ol' Chris" Chrislip; Date: 1974; Price: no cover price; Page count: 16 pages; Size: small comic; (7.0 x 8.5); Kennedy #: 779; Print information: one printing; 500 copies; There's nothing really "underground" about Fresh Comix. It's more of a DIY comic-zine that has the attitude of an underground.
  6. Cap'n Crudd's Tales of Ol' Monterey Bay & Other Worlds Published by: Oblivia Pictures; Contributors: D. B. L.; Heath, Richard Heath; Date: 1971; Price: no cover price; Page count: 16 pages; Size: small comic; (5.5 x 8.25); Kennedy #: 378; Print information: unknown; I was reviewing this book just prior to posting and noticed the 1971 credit date. It seemed that a book of this "type" was published so early in 1971. Sure enough its Kennedy citation makes note of the same fact and suggests that it may been printed a later date - 1978ish.
  7. Up from the Pitts Published by: Kat and Heap; Contributors: Jim Phillips; Dennis Hood; Date: 1978; Price: no cover price; Page count: 24 pages; Size: comic; (7.0 x 10.0); Kennedy #: 2116; Print information: one printing; 2000 copies; Another supposed 2,000 copy book that's tougher to find then its run size would suggest. I really like the artwork and sense of humour that the duo put into their effort. I tried to determine if this is the same "Jim Phillips" who was involved with some or all of the following: Slug Comics, Eternal Truth or several early surf productions, but I could not in time for this posting.
  8. Cerebus the Aardvark #1 Counterfeit Published by: unauthorized edition; Contributors: David Sim; Deni Lobert; Date: 1982; Price: one dollar; Page count: 28 pages; Size: magazine; (7.5 x 10); Kennedy #: cited in abovegrounds #22; Print information: unknown Yesterday I posted this information in a Cerebus thread, but waste not want not. I managed to purchase a raw example of the Cerebus #1 fake. Previously in this thread I had to snag on-line images of the fake and compare those to images of my real example. I would like to revisit most stated tells using side-by-side images of my real and fake examples of Cerebus #1. Any effects from camera and lighting conditions should apply equally when both books are viewed together. I hope this comparative run-down will assist those of you planning to buy an on-line example based on its posted images. 1. Inner Cover Gloss This is the best tell because it is the easiest from both potential buyer and seller to check and understand. Earlier in this thread I had to resort the curling back the front cover of my real example back onto the inner cover to show this comparison. It's now pretty easy with an example of each. Real examples have glossy outer covers but the inner covers have a matte finish. While fake examples a glossy inner cover stock that matches the gloss of the outer cover: 2. Front Cover Print Quality As discussed earlier in this thread, the quality of the black print on the front cover should not be used as a criteria for determining whether a book is fake or real. I do concede that a healthy percentage of real examples do have scummy/dirty black print on the front covers, but many examples are just a sharply printed as the "better" printed fake. If I did not label the side-by-side image below, would you be able to distinguish by black print quality which was real and which was not? 3. Red Hue on the Cover Yes, the "red" on the covers of fake examples is lighter and less rich than those of real ones. I believe this is the tell that Sim uses to spot a fake at 10 feet away at past signing events. But on-line images and the conditions under which they were taken has a big effect. It would be difficult to tell one way or the other when buying on-line because reality could be shifted. Also as pointed out earlier by ecgt, the effect of fainting from UV light exposure may also be a factor. I could distinguish a colour difference between my copies but when an image was taken with a camera this difference virtually disappeared in the final result. I have placed a fake book back cover up (on the left) directly alongside the real book front cover up (on the right) and aligned the cover design. Not much of a difference and almost looks to be the same book and not two: 4. Screened red dots This is a decent tell, but it confuses most and should be viewed in person with the item in hand. On-line images may be blurry or produce moire patterns that obscure the reality of the image. The best areas to view the difference is on the front cover: upper shield glare of center bottom red solider and chest of the white soldier above will have extra red print in white areas around the black print when compared to a real example: 5. Staples I forgot about this one, but it is a great tell that was first published in the Kennedy Guide back in 1982. Real examples have bright silver staples and the staples of the fakes that were produced in 1982 are bronze in colour: 6. Darkened Screened Images of Cerebus This is a really well-known tell and may be the second most useful after cover gloss. Most inner images of Cerebus appear darker on the fake when compared to the print of the real example. In fact, some images almost appear to a dark solid grey opposed to a screened grey. One of the best spots to check in on the "Dragon Page", where you do not even need the print of the real example to compare it to - it’s just way too dark to be correct: 7. Possible New Tell - Extended Cover Back Page Design with White Line Although its unconfirmed and probably too good-to-be-true: my fake has a white line along the page edge of inner back cover. This has to do with front/back registration and the jogging/squaring of print stock prior to printing and cutting. This is because for whatever reason the design of the last back cover page was extended about an inch and half from the original film. You can see a darker wavy printed ribbon in from the edge both on the fake and on the real example, meaning this change make post original film. There is a small chance that this white edge always appears on the back inner cover of all fakes. I doubt that with time that the “white line” will become a true tell, but never know and you heard it here first! 8. New Tell: Phantom Registration Markings On the back cover on real examples there is a noticeable black registration target mark and faint lines extending from the red title border into the black margins. This supports that the width of the book was extended with solid black print post-film/plate the design should have ended at the red border. I am not too sure of the reason for the extension, so ask Sim. These marks also appear very faintly in the fake examples which are printed in red not black. These markings are difficult to spot on the fake to the point of not being there. As far as I know, I may be the first to report there presence. 9. Stars Wars Ad On real examples the reverse image of the Stars Wars ad shows through to the back cover just below the upper red title. It's difficult to see and may not be too useful if trying distinguish what is and what is not real on-line.
  9. I managed to purchase a raw example of the Cerebus #1 fake. Previously in this thread I had to snag on-line images of the fake and compare those to images of my real example. I would like to revisit most stated tells using side-by-side images of my real and fake examples of Cerebus #1. Any effects effects from camera and lighting conditions should be minimized and apply equally when both books are viewed together. I hope this comparative run-down will assist those of you planning to buy an on-line example based on posted images. 1. Inner Cover Gloss This is the best tell because it is the easiest for both potential buyer and potential to check and understand. Earlier in this thread I had to resort the curling back the front cover of my real example back onto the inner cover to show this comparison. It's now pretty easy with an example of each. Real examples have glossy outer covers but the inner covers have a matte finish. While fake examples a glossy inner cover stock that matches the gloss of the outer cover: 2. Front Cover Print Quality As discussed earlier in this thread, the quality of the black print on the front cover should not be used as a criteria for determining whether a book is fake or real. I do concede that a healthy percentage of real examples do have scummy/dirty black print on the front covers, but many examples are just a sharply printed as the "better" printed fake. If I did not label the side-by-side image below, would you be able to distinguish by black print quality which was real and which was not? 3. Red Hue on the Cover Yes, the "red" on the covers of fake examples is lighter and less rich than those of real ones. I believe this is the tell that Sim uses to spot a fake at 10 feet away at past signing events. But on-line images and the conditions under which they were taken has a big effect. It would be difficult to tell one way or the other when buying on-line because reality could be shifted. Also as pointed out earlier by ecgt, the effect of fainting fdue to UV light exposure may alsobe a factor. I could distinguish a colour difference between my copies but when an image was taken with a camera this difference virtually disappeared in the final result. I have placed a fake book back cover up (on the left) directly alongside the real book front cover up (on the right) and aligned the cover design. Not much of a difference and almost looks to be the same book and not two: 4. Screened red dots This is a decent tell, but it confuses most and should be best viewed in person with the item in hand. On-line images may be blurry or produce moire patterns that obscure the reality of the image. The best areas to view the difference is on the front cover: upper shield glare of center bottom red solider and chest of the white soldier above will have extra red print in white areas around the black print when compared to a real example: 5. Staples I forgot about this one, but it is a great tell that was first published in the Kennedy Guide back in 1982. Real examples have bright silver staples and the the staples of the fakes that were produced in 1982 are bronze in colour: 6. Darkened Screened Images of Cerebus This is a really well-known tell and may be the second most useful after cover gloss. Most inner images of Cerebus appear darker on the fake when compared to the print of the real example. In fact, some images almost appear to a dark solid grey opposed to a screened grey. One of the best spots to check in on the "Dragon Page", where you do not even need the print of the real example to compare it to - its just way too dark to be correct: 7. Possible New Tell - Extended Cover Back Page Design Although it's unconfirmed and probably too good-to-be-true: my fake has a white line along the page edge of inner back cover. This has to do with front/back registration and the jogging/squaring of print stock prior to printing and cutting. This is because for whatever reason the design of the last back cover page was extended about an inch and half from the original film. You can see a darker wavy printed ribbon in from the edge both on the fake and on the real example, meaning this change make post original film. There is a small chance that this white edge always appears on the back inner cover of all fakes. I doubt it, but you heard it here first! 8. New Tell: Phantom Registration Markings On the back cover on real examples there is a noticeable black registration target mark and faint lines extending from the red title border into the black margins. This supports that the width of the book was extended with solid black print post-film/plate the design should of ended at the red border. The reason for the extension I am not to sure, ask Sim. But it does provide another tells. These marks also appear very faintly in fake examples but in red print and not black. These markings on the fake are difficult to spot to the point of not being there. As far as I know, I am the first to report this. 9. Forgot One: Stars Wars Ad I good collecting friend of mine just pointed out that I forgot a tell that also was described by Kennedy in his guide. On real examples the reverse image of the Stars Wars ad shows through to the back cover just below the upper red title. It's difficult to see and may not be too useful if trying distinguish what is and what is not real on-line.
  10. Mississippi Mud Comics #1 Published by: Winston Harold Bray; Contributors: Joel Weinstein; Jim Blashfield; Winston Harold; Dennis L. Cunningham; J. Ross; Robert A. Kertell; Dana Hoyle; Date: 1981; Price: dollar twenty five; Page count: 20 pages; Size: magazine; (8.5 x 11); Kennedy #: 1272; Print information: one printing; 1,000 copies; Mississippi Mud is a literary/arts periodical from Portland that started out as a mimeographed handout in 1973 that evolved over 25 years into a slick and glossed magazine publication. In 1981, a single all-comix issue that deserves more attention was produced as part of this transformative journey. For years, I had assumed that the "Dennis L. Cunningham" that played a role in its content was the same person as "Dennis A. Cunningham" who worked with Richard Corben on Tales from the Plague and Weirdom - they are not.
  11. The Notorious Hatte Brothers Gang (first and second printings) Published by: Recent Future Productions; Contributors: Basil Hatte; Loondancer; J.W. "Roldo" Lake given thanks credit in second printing; Date: 1980 and 1981; Price: no cover price; Page count: single folded sheet that forms 4 pages; Size: large mini; first printing (5.5 x 7.25); second printing (5.5 x 7.50); Kennedy #: 957; Print information: first printing number of copies unknown; second printing 250 copies; Bail Hatte and Roldo were members of the "Free Kluck" team in Winnipeg, Manitoba. The team as a membership and individually were responsible for dozens of Canadian underground comix in the late 70s and early 80s. What could make Hatte Brothers interesting to some collectors is the way the first and second printing can be distinguished. The the back cover of first printing has trees designed using plaid zip-a-tone and credit is given to Roldo in the second printing for something (making the books?).
  12. Guts #1, #2 and #3 Published by: Lafler Productions; Contributor: Steve Lafler (#1-3); Steve Beaupre (#1-3); Bill Riley (#1); D. Cottrell (#2); Carl Mayfield (#2); Chazzz (#2); Linda Di Silvestro (#3); Rob Huffman (#3); Marcel Tulloh (#3); Date: 1981 (#1); 1982 (#2 and #3); Price: 65 cents (#1); one dollar (#2); dollar fifty (#3); Page count: 24 pages (#1); 32 pages (#2); 36 pages (#3); Size: magazine; #1 and #3 (7.75 x 10.75); #3 ((7.75 x 10.75); Kennedy #: #1 (936); #2 (937); #3 (post guide); Print information: #1 (one printing of 1000 copies); #2 (one printing of 2500 copies); #3 (unknown); You would not be alone in thinking that books with print runs above 1000 copies should not be an "Post Your Obscure Undergrounds" thread. I believe that something happened with the Guts series because copies do not appear on the market as the run numbers as stated by Kennedy would suggest. It took me way longer to piecemeal a set together than I would have thought. Its availability mimics a British underground publication.
  13. Comet Tales #2 - Special Capt. Cannibas Issue Published by: Rocket Comics; Contributor: Mike Robinson; Larry Nibert; Date: 1983; Price: 3 dollars; Page count: 32 pages; Size: comic; (6.75 x 10.0); Kennedy #: post guide; Print information: one printing; 500 numbered copies; Comet Tales is a better than most sci-fi pro-zine started in 1982 by James M. Pack. The second issue features a head-turning colour cover that causes some sellers in the on-line market attempting to justify an asking price of two hundred dollars plus. The second issue also features a letter from Larry Blake whom collaborated here-and-there with Nibert and Pack on the odd project, including the debut issue of his ultra-rare zine Afterworld.
  14. It's Me Published by: Laughing Man Productions; Contributor: Mark S. Fisher; Date: 1983; Price: no cover price; Page count: 12 pages: heavy stock sheet folded as 4 hand coloured pages with 8 pages of B&W inner guts; Size: mini; (4.25 x 3.5); Kennedy #: post guide; Print information: 100 signed and numbered copies; how many were hand coloured is unknown; In 1983, Mark Fisher produced about 10 titles under the banner of his Laughing Man Productions. This unfortunately is the only issue from that grouping that I own or have even seen. Although I purchased the item about 2 years ago, it was only today that I noticed the wonderful surprise in between the folded sections of the cover - see last image.