New to OA Collecting, Advice, tips?
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On 2/25/2019 at 8:14 PM, BCarter27 said:

People, keep your art out of the sun... particularly the color stuff--

NVcR9poy_2502191617341gpadd.jpeg

338fcb875b37076ca5f530a4551db43b.jpg

 

AlH86koh_1105182020491gpaiadd.jpg

Were these directly in the light?  Was it in a frame?  Do you have more details about how this was stored?

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On 3/9/2019 at 4:39 PM, Webhead2018 said:

So question for all. I have an original commisson on art board drawing that is 9x12. I originally wanted to frame it. But I have no place to hang art. So I was wondering what is best way to protect the piece still without framing it. Like get some sort of slab like thing, bag and board like a comic etc.....

Depending on how nice and rare a piece, for my best pieces I get a mylar with an acid free backing board.  I put microchamber paper between the art and the board.  I bought all of this stuff from bagsunlimited.  Then I put this in an acid free storage box.  I am going away from the itoya portfolios.

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39 minutes ago, Peter L said:

Were these directly in the light?  Was it in a frame?  Do you have more details about how this was stored?

Unfortunately, I don't have more information about the conditions they were displayed in, but are just two recent examples I came across.

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4 hours ago, Peter L said:

Depending on how nice and rare a piece, for my best pieces I get a mylar with an acid free backing board.  I put microchamber paper between the art and the board.  I bought all of this stuff from bagsunlimited.  Then I put this in an acid free storage box.  I am going away from the itoya portfolios.

And keep it in a dark, dry place.

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People don't get your art signed after the fact. Just don't. It's not worth the risk.

IMG_2176.thumb.jpg.d29b368e0531b3371327bd3d337af849.jpg.b0129eaeb3031bb23befed7130a92a75.jpg

 

And it you MUST get the art signed, let it only be the penciller and inker. AND HAVE THEM DO IT IN THE MARGIN! GAH!

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15 hours ago, Doc67 said:

DO NOT consign your art to Heritage to pay for auction winnings!  Consign to Comiclink and pay for the Heritage bill with the advance from CLink.

Not about Allen specifically, an overall comment on the hobby: Consigning forward to pay for things you can't afford today, wow, never crossed my mind to be so fiscally imprudent. You've either got the juice or you don't. Wow.

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2 hours ago, vodou said:

Not about Allen specifically, an overall comment on the hobby: Consigning forward to pay for things you can't afford today, wow, never crossed my mind to be so fiscally imprudent. You've either got the juice or you don't. Wow.

I don’t get it. If I want something at an auction and don’t want to spend more money - what’s wrong with sending other pieces, getting an advance and paying for the new art? How is that fiscally imprudent? Selling something to buy something else? If that’s the case - being in any hobby is fiscally imprudent?

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49 minutes ago, RICKYBOBBY said:

I don’t get it.

All hat, no cattle.

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Posted (edited)
8 hours ago, RICKYBOBBY said:

I don’t get it. If I want something at an auction and don’t want to spend more money - what’s wrong with sending other pieces, getting an advance and paying for the new art? How is that fiscally imprudent? Selling something to buy something else? If that’s the case - being in any hobby is fiscally imprudent?

Well, pretty much, most hobbies involving collecting and buying things is not fiscally prudent. They are not as fluid as stocks or bonds,and there is a big gap at-a particular point in time between what you can sell it for and what you bought for. Lots of attempted flips probably flop. 

Well, whadayaknow? I just hit a 1000 posts.

Edited by Rick2you2

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Rick2you2 said:

Well, pretty much, most hobbies involving collecting and buying things is not fiscally prudent. They are not as fluid as stocks or bonds,and there is a big gap at-a particular point in time between what you can sell it for and what you bought for. Lots of attempted flips probably flop. 

Well, whadayaknow? I just hit a 1000 posts.

Well I totally agree! Being involved in the hobby is being fiscally prudent. It’s a luxury to participate.

If someone likes a piece that comes up for sale usually people try to sell something they are okay parting with. If you happen to win the piece before you can sell - then why not send in your piece for an advance ( assuming you are happy with what they evaluate your piece at)?

Not everyone is sitting on a wad of cash - but maybe some art.

Edited by RICKYBOBBY

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From my experience...

If you see a piece you love but feel it’s too expensive, it likely is. You may see it year after year. But year after year the price will continue to move up and you’ll still feel it’s too expensive. Seems to be the way things are going lately. Some pieces are always out of reach.

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Posted (edited)

Know exactly what a piece is about before you buy it. Take the time to double check through quick research right then and there if you have to. And if it is a deal that looks too good... it probably is. which brings us to the first part of my post. The time i broke that rule def reinforced my belief in it! All part of my tuition LOL! lol

Edited by The Cimmerians Purse
English language

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On 4/6/2019 at 9:42 PM, BCarter27 said:

People don't get your art signed after the fact. Just don't. It's not worth the risk.

IMG_2176.thumb.jpg.d29b368e0531b3371327bd3d337af849.jpg.b0129eaeb3031bb23befed7130a92a75.jpg

 

And it you MUST get the art signed, let it only be the penciller and inker. AND HAVE THEM DO IT IN THE MARGIN! GAH!

This is a special case where, yes, you can get the signature of world famous actor who played Conan in the film this particular comic book (to which you have the cover art for) was adapting. But....make sure it's not on the goddamned art, and located in the margin or the back.

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7 hours ago, PhilipB2k17 said:

This is a special case where, yes, you can get the signature of world famous actor who played Conan in the film this particular comic book (to which you have the cover art for) was adapting. But....make sure it's not on the goddamned art, and located in the margin or the back.

Well, I see plenty of negative space for a John Milius (aka Walter Sobchak) signature next week just to balance it out.

 

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When storing art in mylar bags, should we still exercise extreme caution with storing them in non acid-free environments like mounting boards if framed, etc?  I don't know how much 'protection' the mylar bags are actually providing. Currently I have my art in 2mm bcw mylar sleeves, no artboard backing, but then the mylar bags are tape-mounted to paper or boards and mats that might not be acid-free. I do cover up the frames during they day when I am not at home just to protect against UV damage, but none of them are in direct sunlight anyways. All of the pages are modern, so they're still in pretty good shape for the most part. What are some recommendations in this scenario? 

Edited by Mike R V
Wrong word

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3 hours ago, Mike R V said:

paper or boards and mats that might not be acid-free.

The long-term solution is to use AlphaRag boards in your backing/matting (which are essentially thick Microchamber/zeolite impregnated.)

http://www.conservationresources.com/Main/section_16/section16_01.htm

http://www.conservationresources.com/Main/section_16/section16_02.htm

The quick solution would be to get some 11x17, 12x18, or 13x19 pieces of Microchamber and slide them into the mylar behind the pages. This will help trap any off-gassing from the art itself or the very, very little that might be leaking in from the top of the open mylar. (And I'm being very OCD here, mind you. The reality is if you have it flat in the mylar, you are already much better off than most other storage.)

I am a proponent of Microchamber for any pieces encapsulated in mylar. That's why the LOC recommends "airing" pieces out. And even CGC uses Microchamber paper to trap off-gassing within the mylar tomb of a CGC case.

Microchamber interleaves-

https://www.bagsunlimited.com/product/7401/archival-bmicrochamber-paperb-br18-x-24-x-0025-thickbrremoves-acids-and-odors-in-paper-brarchival-acid-free-font-colorredindefinite-storagefont

https://www.bagsunlimited.com/product/6192/archival-bmicrochamber-paperbbr-11-x-17-x-0025-thickbrremoves-acids-and-odors-in-paper-brarchival-acid-free-font-colorredindefinite-storagefont

https://www.bagsunlimited.com/product/7521/archival-bmicrochamber-paperbbr-13-x-19-x-0025-thickbrremoves-acids-and-odors-in-paper-brarchival-acid-free-font-colorredindefinite-storagefont

and bond papers-

http://www.conservationresources.com/Main/section_15/section15_04.htm

are cheap enough to consider.

Newer Bristol boards are generally more archival than older boards and papers.

 

NOTE: A further word of caution about off-gassing... Beware of custom stained-wood cabinets and bookshelves. Been there, done that. Ended up with a tanned book collection! I'd put everything in archival gallery boxes and leave the doors off for the first year after staining. And line the shelves with the aforementioned Microchamber paper.

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2 hours ago, BCarter27 said:

The long-term solution is to use AlphaRag boards in your backing/matting (which are essentially thick Microchamber/zeolite impregnated.)

http://www.conservationresources.com/Main/section_16/section16_01.htm

http://www.conservationresources.com/Main/section_16/section16_02.htm

The quick solution would be to get some 11x17, 12x18, or 13x19 pieces of Microchamber and slide them into the mylar behind the pages. This will help trap any off-gassing from the art itself or the very, very little that might be leaking in from the top of the open mylar. (And I'm being very OCD here, mind you. The reality is if you have it flat in the mylar, you are already much better off than most other storage.)

I am a proponent of Microchamber for any pieces encapsulated in mylar. That's why the LOC recommends "airing" pieces out. And even CGC uses Microchamber paper to trap off-gassing within the mylar tomb of a CGC case.

Microchamber interleaves-

https://www.bagsunlimited.com/product/7401/archival-bmicrochamber-paperb-br18-x-24-x-0025-thickbrremoves-acids-and-odors-in-paper-brarchival-acid-free-font-colorredindefinite-storagefont

https://www.bagsunlimited.com/product/6192/archival-bmicrochamber-paperbbr-11-x-17-x-0025-thickbrremoves-acids-and-odors-in-paper-brarchival-acid-free-font-colorredindefinite-storagefont

https://www.bagsunlimited.com/product/7521/archival-bmicrochamber-paperbbr-13-x-19-x-0025-thickbrremoves-acids-and-odors-in-paper-brarchival-acid-free-font-colorredindefinite-storagefont

and bond papers-

http://www.conservationresources.com/Main/section_15/section15_04.htm

are cheap enough to consider.

Newer Bristol boards are generally more archival than older boards and papers.

 

NOTE: A further word of caution about off-gassing... Beware of custom stained-wood cabinets and bookshelves. Been there, done that. Ended up with a tanned book collection! I'd put everything in archival gallery boxes and leave the doors off for the first year after staining. And line the shelves with the aforementioned Microchamber paper.

Thanks for the advice! I'll be getting those microchamber papers for sure, so thanks for providing the links! They will only be in their current frames for about a year until I get them replaced with actual archival quality framing. They are sealed with tape over the flaps in their mylar bags. I was just afraid the adhesive from the tape or other materials from the other contacting surfaces would leak in and start destroying the piece within that year before replacing the frames with a more permanent setting.

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6 hours ago, Mike R V said:

When storing art in mylar bags, should we still exercise extreme caution with storing them in non acid-free environments like mounting boards if framed, etc?  I don't know how much 'protection' the mylar bags are actually providing. Currently I have my art in 2mm bcw mylar sleeves, no artboard backing, but then the mylar bags are tape-mounted to paper or boards and mats that might not be acid-free. I do cover up the frames during they day when I am not at home just to protect against UV damage, but none of them are in direct sunlight anyways. All of the pages are modern, so they're still in pretty good shape for the most part. What are some recommendations in this scenario? 

Keep them in an environment which is moisture-free and in the dark. I would not place them in any area where they could get any sunlight, and your covering may not be adequate.Artifical light (except for "artificial sunlight" bulbs) is not a potential source of harm. 

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49 minutes ago, Rick2you2 said:

Keep them in an environment which is moisture-free and in the dark. I would not place them in any area where they could get any sunlight, and your covering may not be adequate.Artifical light (except for "artificial sunlight" bulbs) is not a potential source of harm. 

I've made these thick black foam board coverings that block out most of the light, if not all. There might be a tiny bit of refracted light getting in from somewhere, but not much. The top images, frames were too big so I didn't have a chance yet to make side closures like the bottom image, so those would be the ones to get minimal light if any. Is that enough protection or should I go ahead and add those sides in?

20190907_224250.jpg

20190908_153914.jpg

Edited by Mike R V
Added description.

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