Jack Kirby's Silver Age output sans Stan Lee!
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Wow, when you think about it, how many times did Kirby re-invent Captain America:

 

1) The Guardian

2) Fighting American

3) Private Strong

4) OMAC

5) any others?

Edited by AtlasFan

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Given all of the Adenture Comics issues in which Kirby’s GA appears feature Curt Swan Superboy covers, it doesn’t surprise me. Unless somebody has the TPB you posted, I doubt anybody wants to damage their books folding them over for a scan.

 

They can just post the Superboy covers, or of course interior scans from reading copies.

 

(shrug)

 

Dont forget Kirby's Green Arrow run in World's Finest as well.

 

Ahhhhh, issues #96-99! I thought Kirby was already gone by the time Green Arrow moved over to World's Finest.

 

(shrug)

 

Wow, when you think about it, how many times did Kirby re-invent Captain America:

 

1) The Guardian

2) Fighting American

3) Private Strong

4) OMAC

5) any others?

 

The first two were excellent characters; the other two, not so much.

 

:preach:

Edited by Hepcat

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Here is some of my Stan-Free Kirby. The previously mentioned DC "House" work.

 

SAKirby002.jpg

 

...and all the books with The King's Green Arrow. These issues were among the very first DCs I ever added to my current collection.

 

SAKirby003.jpg

 

Those are really impressive groupings! Pre-1960 DCs are incredibly difficult to find.

 

:)

 

 

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@Atlasfan: Many thanks for the Thor "prototype": it is also incredibly well drawn, surely more than the very first issues of Thor, and we know that Colletta inks unfortunately did not match so well Jack's style.

 

Why do you consider OMAC a sort of "Captain America"? It seems to me he does not have the same connotation as a "patriotic" hero as Cap and the others.

Fighting American, also, as good as it is, it was deliberately created as a parody (explicitly explained by Jack).

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@Atlasfan: Many thanks for the Thor "prototype": it is also incredibly well drawn, surely more than the very first issues of Thor, and we know that Colletta inks unfortunately did not match so well Jack's style.

 

Why do you consider OMAC a sort of "Captain America"? It seems to me he does not have the same connotation as a "patriotic" hero as Cap and the others.

Fighting American, also, as good as it is, it was deliberately created as a parody (explicitly explained by Jack).

 

Remember that OMAC stands for One Man Army Corps. One Man Army = Super Soldier. OMAC was created by the government in a very similar way that Captain America was. The only difference was that OMAC was an outcast in a dystopian future and fought against his creators.

 

Fighting American was not created as a parody, but evolved (devolved?) into a parody of a Red-bashing superhero after the first issue didnt sell so well. He was the most obvious Cap clone.

Edited by AtlasFan

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Remember that OMAC stands for One Man Army Corps. One Man Army = Super Soldier. OMAC was created by the government in a very similar way that Captain America was. The only difference was that OMAC was an outcast in a dystopian future and fought against his creators.

 

Fighting American was not created as a parody, but evolved (devolved?) into a parody of a Red-bashing superhero after the first issue didnt sell so well. He was the most obvious Cap clone.

 

Thanks for the explanation. Well, I think – besides the military implications of the name "Army Corps" – the fact that OMAC has no particular patriotic connotation pretty distinguish it from Captain America and the super-patriot hero in general, like the original Shield and all the others from the "Golden Age".

OMAC, per what you say (I never read it) is closer to Warlock than Captain America.

 

I am familiar with Fighting American and I consider it brilliant, especially after the change. Jack Kirby explained it in the terms that the cold war was being taken too seriously, and aside from sales they had this idea of adding humour to tone down the excessively dramatic connotations.

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Really cool page, an excellent thread resurrection.  Doing it, Kirby was obviously influenced by surrealist and cubist fine art.  It makes me wonder what he could've done with the alternative dimensions of the Dr. Strange stories.

 

Edited by namisgr

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6 hours ago, namisgr said:

Really cool page, an excellent thread resurrection.  Doing it, Kirby was obviously influenced by surrealist and cubist fine art.  It makes me wonder what he could've done with the alternative dimensions of the Dr. Strange stories.

 

Makes me wonder when Kirby learned of the fourth dimension and the cubist/surrealist art that could be influenced by the concept, because he also drew it in Blue Bolt #5 (October 1940, Novelty Press):

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Edited by Electricmastro

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Now I miss my old copy of Alarming Tales! The Blue Bolt is fantastic. I think I’ve seen some of it before, but wow! 

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15 minutes ago, KirbyJack said:

Now I miss my old copy of Alarming Tales! The Blue Bolt is fantastic. I think I’ve seen some of it before, but wow! 

 

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26 minutes ago, KirbyJack said:

Now I miss my old copy of Alarming Tales! The Blue Bolt is fantastic. I think I’ve seen some of it before, but wow! 

And of course, he drew the fourth dimension once again in Fantastic Four #51 (June 1966, Marvel Comics):

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DEcMo5kK1X7Rrg_5FFnwIj3G2db3V2USSwd25YL7
 

DBI6BHTrSK3bcJvPBX42cOAm4heKIR_4LwCjLNdT

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Tommy Troy’s transformation into The Fly from Adventures of The Fly #1 (August 1959, Archie Comics):

PiST6-EUQtAthrImIz_InTPPJzjwsl2FPcRP1kVl

Edited by Electricmastro

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