How to spot restoration....?
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Just got a new instrument and it is a sweetie. A stereo microscope. It is 20power and 40power. Has substage lighting and top lighting. Have been looking at a few of my books through it and I must say it is most useful.

 

scope.jpg

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I've been considering one of those; I know CGC has one also. I've been holding out for one with either a LARGE base, big enough to move a comic back and forth on, or with no base at all but a "boom" or swivel arm that allows you to move the eyepieces back and forth over a surface.

 

What were you using for magnification before this?

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What were you using for magnification before this?

 

I have a few loupes I use ranging in power from 5x to 20x. But the stereo imaging is really really amazing. I understand about the boom. I use it for other things as well and like the substage illumination and the stage itself. But I can rig up my own boom for cheap and plan to do so. The body is easily rackied off the post and I can put it on my homemade book with no problem.

 

If you can spare the couple of hundred or so I highly recommend it. Amazing instrument.

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Yours cost a few hundred? Where'd you buy it? I see them on EBay all the time, I figured I'd be able to get one for between 100 and 200 if I looked long enough...I've just stopped looking. Need to start again.

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Yours cost a few hundred? Where'd you buy it?

 

No - it cost 200. I tried once on ebay and got sniped badly and said "[!@#%^&^] - with the shipping cost I'll just go to Scope City here in San Francisco" - which I did - they had the one I got but only a display model so they knocked off some $$$ and got it for 200. You can see their internet catalogue at www.scopecity.com. Mine is a Parks 103 TB. Certainly not a top of the line or a zoom - but the image is gorgeous - very crisp and clear.

 

 

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Have you been able to get a feel for the features on a stereo microscope that are bare-minimum must-have and which are boy-I-sure-would-like-to-have-THAT! You mentioned zoom--does the one you bought have a single level of magnification? This one looks like the type I want regarding a boom, but I have no idea if it would be lacking features I would later regret not having:

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2519281270&category=26411

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That one looks good. It is not a zoom. A zoom would have continuous magnifcations - just like the zoom lens on a camera. It is similar to mine. You change the objective and you get different magnications.

 

The one I have has two magnifications: 20x and 40x. The eyepieces are 10x. The objectives are 2x and 4x. So I can rotate the objective to go from 20 to 40. I know I can get eyepieces for it that will increase or decrease the mag. They have to be matched of course but not too hard to find.

 

The true zoom feature is going to add a bit to the price and after that snipe and looking at Completed Auctions, I realized a decent zoom scope would be more than I felt was needed $$$ wise.

 

 

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I can't believe how many stereo microscopes there are on E-Bay that cost over $200 ! They must be used by some mainstream scientific or medical practice...who buys them mostly, do you think? Eye doctors?

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I can't believe how many stereo microscopes there are on E-Bay that cost over $200 ! They must be used by some mainstream scientific or medical practice...who buys them mostly, do you think? Eye doctors?

 

On ebay - I tend to think more hobbyists but maybe not. I use mine also for cleaning encrusted ancient coins (no one even THINK about "coinee"ing me or I shall quote the entire works of not only Lewis Carroll but Edgar Allen poe AND Saul The Barber!

 

Look at folks like us. Specialists in a hobby with certain proclivities that a stereo microscope would be a boon to. Lord knows how many unknown hobbies are out there where such an instrument could also render service.

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....this is a subject frequently discussed on the boards, but i thought it would be good to start up a knowledge base on the subject.................

 

.......some resto i find hard to detect my self (especially trimming) and would appreciate some input from those with more experience........... grin.gif

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What does the two different lighting levels (substage and top) on your scope do for you?

 

Also, which zoom level have you found to be most useful for comics so far--20x, 40x, or both? I'm wondering what the maximum useful magnification for comics is.

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The substage is useful for translucent/transparant objects. Just enjoy looking at various things. Dead insects, etc.

 

The top lighting illuminates opague (aka comic books) onjects from above. Am also gonna get a gooseneck spotlight as an addition so I can cast light at varying angles.

 

I've found 20x is best for general comic work but want a touch lower as well - but the 40x - once you identify a suspicious area - can be VERY handy for - dare I say it - microscopic examination. I would like to get down to 10x and up to about 60x. Can do that with some eyepieces along the way but right now the 20/40 really is wroking nicely.

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Now how's THIS for ironic! This is the very same seller that always offers those cheesy $14.00 (can be bought for $5.00 in novelty stores/catalogs) hand held black light, "fool-proof" restoration detectors (for identifying color touch). How do you suppose he "missed" the entire black area of the spine (painted with acrylics) with cases of those "fool-proof" gadgets in his home?

 

 

web page

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::What IS Gloss?::

The glossiness of paper comes from a couple of things: the amount of "calendering" paper has gone through (basically a process that can smooth out the surface and bring out a sheen) and the "hardness" of the paper - in paper manufacture, clay minerals (mainly kaolinite) are in the mix and make for a paper that can take a very smooth glossy finish. One way to think of it is stones. A soft stone like Calcite (Mohs 3) will never take a brilliant polish the way the much harder star ruby (Mohs 9) will.

 

Now some paper come through with a gloss added in manufacture, and some of the real slick modern books may be of such ilk. But overall, calendering and clay minerals are what is responsible for that glossy coating. It is inherent to the paper itself and cannot be recreated with a spray.

 

::Advisability Of Re-Glossing::

Anything that completly coats the surface of a cover may well be considered irreversible, unless it is dissolvable by certain 100% evaporating no-residue solvents like Naptha. However, that requires that the substance that created the fake gloss did no damage to the paper. And it can take some time (sometimes a few years) for the damage to appear. I understand restoration, firmly believe it is an important and necessary aspect of maintaing the longevity of the comics that really need it (a color touch is NOT what I am talking about! ) but I consdier reglossing a more drastic restoration step than a piece (or even several pieces) replacement. A more benign gloss is a methyl cellulose solution, but it really doesn't recreate that gloss we are used to in the 50's and later books. And while it does no real harm to ther paper it would require a water wash to remove it, which brings the cover into a whole new realm of restoration.

 

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POV---Ive got a glossy question for ya---ever notice how some of the older books only have gloss on the characters and not th ebackground areas? Im not sure if Im talking about white covers only---but how does this happen?

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ever notice how some of the older books only have gloss on the characters and not th ebackground areas?

 

I've noticed similar on my pre-code horror. One thing I HAVE noticed - but not really studied until you brought it up - is that those four color combinations that have a high percentage of 100% (pure) 4/c color (yellow, magenta, cyan or black) have higher reflectivity as the ink is more heavily distributed than a color that has, say, a maximum of 50% of any on those 4 colors, as that lesser intensity would be broken up by a considerable dot pattern.

 

If this is too "printer-geeky" let me know and can try to elaborate.

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this is an awesome thread, what about spotting married covers and pages? Is there a reference source for page counts? And what are the Howard Keltner indexes?

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If this is too "printer geeky" let me know and can try to elaborate

 

I would find it quite interesting if you could go into it sharing greater detail with us. Thank you P.R.

 

Gerald

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A couple of things:

1) Here are some more references.

J.S. Mills, R.White. The Organic Chemistry of Museum Objects 2nd ed. Butterworth-Heinemann, London 1994.

 

H. Kühn. Conservation and Restoration of Works of Art and Antiquities. Butterworths, London 1986.

 

J.M. Cronyn The Elements of Archaeological Conservation Routledge, London 1990.

 

2) A good way to spot (some) cleaning is to look on the inside of the covers. If the red ink from the outside cover has bled through to the inside, it has likely been cleaned or had tape removal. The solvent that the paper is immersed in solublizes the inks and allows for migration. Red is the most common ink, but green and blue do it as well.

 

3) Great discussion on trimming, but one addition is that the right edge and bottom edge should form a "V" pointing out of the book, while the top edge should form a "V" pointing into the book.

 

 

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how can red or green inks bleed through the covers when these was no red or green ink ever used in the printing of the cover, hmmm???

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