Golden Age decline
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32 posts in this topic

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29 minutes ago, rjpb said:

No love for Percival Popp, who went from comic sidekick, to starring character with a mere spectre of the Spectre tagging along?  At least Dr. Fate was only reduced to a generic wise-cracking crime fighter by the end of his run.

The earlier, darker stories had a lasting effect on me after reading some of them in the DC 100 pagers, back in the 70s.

Still my favourite parts of the Archive collections.

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Are any of these really a decline? Sure I guess maybe personally to some modern collectors they are, but publishers were just doing whatever sold best and just changed things according to what sold and what didn't, that's all their motivation was. Like how people complain about Robin or kid sidekicks, well that is what sold and what the kids buying the comics wanted so that is what publishers gave them. All these ones that are given as examples of a decline, I am sure far outsold the other ones. People also seem to forget that 99 percent of people buying these comics and the target audience were preteen kids.

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13 minutes ago, RareHighGrade said:

I doubt anyone would disagree that More Fun Comics declined when Dover and Clover became the cover feature.

I'm actually a big fan of both Genius Jones and Jimminy and the Magic Book, and from what I've seen of the respective features, Superboy was a step up from the late episodes of Doctor Fate and the Spectre...

So, yeah.  I disagree.  I would even say that the book improved around the time Dover & Clover became the cover feature.

I will, however, grant that Dover & Clover had NOTHING to do with said improvement... worst thing Henry Boltinoff  ever worked on.

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9 hours ago, sacentaur said:
11 hours ago, tth2 said:

is that the first face palm (cover) in comics?

An earlier issue had a text story that mentioned a palm tree and also had someone's hand on the cover, so I guess that's gotta be it!

Sorry Steve, but Bob Overstreet has given that the dreaded "cameo" notation.  So Hit #49 continues to be "First GA appearance of face palm".  

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8 hours ago, Ken Aldred said:

The earlier, darker stories had a lasting effect on me after reading some of them in the DC 100 pagers, back in the 70s.

Still my favourite parts of the Archive collections.

I loved reading those as a kid. The youngsters don't realize how tough it was to find cheap ways to read GA back then. Fantasy Masterpieces, DC 100 pagers and the 48 page quarter books, and the muddy B/W Alan Light flashbacks were it. 

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Having recently read the last days of the GA Wonder Woman , (issues #86-97 (56-57)), from a historian perspective, tenuous to read.

Recycled scripts, Harry Peter declining health resulting in sub-par artwork.

 

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Yeah, I think that by 1950, it was only really DC (Superman), Fawcett (Captain Marvel), and Quality (Plastic Man), who were still fully committed to regularly publishing superheroes, though even then, they had all taken an arguably more comedic direction to fit in better with the general popularity of comedy comics at the time, among other popular genres.

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I suspect the Korean War and Vietnam War had something to do with Barry Allen helping attract success for superheroes again, as was previously with World War II. The US wasn’t as involved in those wars in the 1950s, but you definitely saw a gradually renewed interest if the publishers were anything to go by, as publishers other than DC were noticeably publishing them in 1955, which was a year before Barry Allen’s debut:

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Zoo Funnies didn’t set a particularly high bar to begin with, but I thought its art was at least decent near the beginning by issue 3. By late 1947 though, it had really degenerated into something else.

Issue 3 (January, 1946):

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Issue 14 (December, 1947):

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