Whatever became of Bang Zoom?
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48 posts in this topic

2 hours ago, Bronty said:

I don't know that beating the bushes for acquisitions is 'dealing'.   I don't seem to recall any discussion of him selling books, although perhaps he did?   Regardless I think a lot of parents would have been close minded about it, so its great that he had more open minded parents.

The no-more-than-$50 per book part I recall as well!    Of course $50 for a book back then wasn't anyting to sneeze at, but still.

You're right, he was taking out "comics wanted" ads not selling ads.  But, I believe he discussed selling comics as well.  I know he attended the 1965 NYCC, and I thought he talked about setting up a table at one of those.  Maybe I am misremembering, and the thread's too long for me to go back and look.

EDIT:  I went back and looked, and this is what I found Bangzoom to have said:

"I acquired my first Golden Age comics in 1962 (Superman 9, Batman 23 and World's Finest 2) from a friend who returned home with them after a visit to an older relative.  Those first GA comics got me hooked and I began searching for more old comics. None of my friends shared my passion and there weren't any shops around that sold back issues, so I began seeking out other sources. The letter columns of JLA comics back then were buzzing with older fans reminiscing about the comics of their childhood. I started writing to them, hoping someone would have some old comic books they would be willing to sell.

Eventually I hooked up with Jerry Bails who, in November, 1963, sent me a copy of the fanzine The Comic Reader which was my introduction to comic fandom.  At about that same time, I had made the acquaintance of a friend of my father's who collected Horatio Alger books. I had learned from him the value of advertising your wants in trade journals. So I took a cue from his methods and started advertising for old comics in antique magazines. I began buying collections and then selling off duplicates and any other unwanted issues through fanzines."  

 

Edited by sfcityduck
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Didn't the $7500.00 collection originate from a store that was closing where the owners didn't return unsold issues and kept them for years? I seem to recall that.

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30 minutes ago, comicnoir said:

Didn't the $7500.00 collection originate from a store that was closing where the owners didn't return unsold issues and kept them for years? I seem to recall that.

If that was the case, then shouldn't we be seeing multiple copies for some of these issues, as opposed to just single copies for each of them?  hm

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2 minutes ago, lou_fine said:

If that was the case, then shouldn't we be seeing multiple copies for some of these issues, as opposed to just single copies for each of them?  hm

Maybe he traded the dupes.

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9 hours ago, comicnoir said:

Didn't the $7500.00 collection originate from a store that was closing where the owners didn't return unsold issues and kept them for years? I seem to recall that.

No, they came from a private residence.  He knew what store the OO bought the comics from based on some stamps and also walked through the house, now a medical office, where the OO lived and checked out what he thought would have been the OO’s bedroom. The OO’s name was in a few of the comics on coupons and on a few of the covers as initials.   My belief, based on what BZ divulged (initials were "WTG"), is that the OO was a W.T. Gilchrist.  I base this conclusion on this awe inspiring statement by BZ:

Quote

In theory, I like the idea of comic pedigrees, unfortunately in practice it becomes a little less fun for me. Probably 95% of my collection was purchased from original owners. The 'pedigrees' in my collection are not known by fandom, they're only known by me. When I look at most of my comics, I can spot the Kolmorgan, Foote, Starr, Clarke, and Gilchrist issues immediately. It makes the collecting a little more special.

 

Edited by sfcityduck
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I can just imagine if this collection were to ever hit the marketplace and of course, the big fight :slapfight:  :slapfight: by the various auction houses to secure the rights to sell this collection for either Bang Zoom himself or sadly, for his estate in the hopeful long and distant future.  (thumbsu

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29 minutes ago, Mmehdy said:

Unless you remember a publication like the RBCC..which there should be a thead on about its impact to the GA comic book market,,

Hey Mitch, why don't you start one!! I read the RBCC when the Buyer's Guide ruled the roost for back issue comic ads but would love to hear about those earlier days.

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