Screen or pressing or both...
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Posted (edited)

.I submitted 4 comics for grading. My first ever submitted. They came back lower then i expected. Main notes pertained to creases in cover. I would think a pressing would take these out. Question is, looking at the pricing for pressing and screening, wouldn't it be more cost effective to just have them pressed and skip the screening to save the 1% (or $10 min.) fee? Pressing would be just $8. Any input would be appreciated

Edited by Conceptcrew

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are you talking about the Quick Press for $8?

Doesn't that require having at least 15 books submitted?

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Posted (edited)

My answer is based on your post saying this was your first grading submission....

Pressing may or may not remove creases to the cover. A general guideline is if the crease is noted as "breaking color". Pressing only makes a crease flat. It cannot fix a color break. Where this gets a bit complicated is when creases are in white areas of the cover. Very common on the back cover. Vintage comics often are white along the edges, spine, corners. White is the absence of color. And the paper is white all the way through. So you never see a crease noted as breaking color in white areas. But the paper fiber might be damaged. If it is - even though it does not "break color" - it cannot be removed. Only made flat. 

Now to your exact question. Skipping prescreen for pressing is something that only those with experience should consider. Since you are new to the entire grading and pressing thing, you would be wise to pay for screening. Otherwise you may well end up paying to press books that will not benefit from pressing. Or even worse are not safe to press. 

Likewise Quick Press (the cheap $8 service) is for books that only need a light, quick once and done press. It a good service ONLY for those very familiar with what defects are easily improved. 

Until you have learned more - and you learn by sending books in - you should stick to paying for screening and full service pressing. 

Edited by Tony S

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Posted (edited)

Also best to visuslly confirm the crease really doesn't break color if in an inked area, notes don't always include "color break" in noted defect. 😉

Edited by MastrCntrlProgram

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9 hours ago, MastrCntrlProgram said:

Also best to visuslly confirm the crease really doesn't break color if in an inked area, notes don't always include "color break" in noted defect. 😉

Yes - a common mistake is to assume graders notes are an exhaustive list of every defect a book has. Instead, they are just the defects the graders took the time to write down.  So MastrcntrlProgram makes an excellent point. The crease might be breaking color even if the grading note fails to mention it. There might be - even probably will be - other defects  not mentioned in the grading notes. 

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Posted (edited)
On 3/5/2019 at 2:10 PM, csaag said:

are you talking about the Quick Press for $8?

Doesn't that require having at least 15 books submitted?

Yes, 15 minimum on quick press but 25 minimum for prescreen.

edit: so for 25 books you would be looking at $28 per book before any discounts for membership on a modern invoice.  $700 plus $5 invoice fee and shipping.

It can get expensive really quick. Choose your books wisely and take the time to perfect your grading skills. 

 

Edited by Catwomancomics

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All books are black so easy to tell if any of the creases break the color. You can see them by moving the book under the light. Now the spine ticks may have broken the color but nkt too worried about that. These questions are just me learning. I am not going to resubmit these comics but will use the information and experiences of other to help he determine future submissions. Thank you to all who posted.

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On 3/7/2019 at 1:30 AM, Tony S said:

Yes - a common mistake is to assume graders notes are an exhaustive list of every defect a book has. Instead, they are just the defects the graders took the time to write down.  So MastrcntrlProgram makes an excellent point. The crease might be breaking color even if the grading note fails to mention it. There might be - even probably will be - other defects  not mentioned in the grading notes. 

Well said. CGC is a volume driven organization. Graders are encouraged to work as quickly as possible in order to increase that volume, so they don't make a note of every single flaw. If they did, turnaround times would take forever...……….

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