Spin roll? Or normal?
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Yes, that's exactly right. If nearly every copy has the same flaw or flaws, CGC won't hammer it as hard as they normally would---as long as the grader is aware of that fact...  

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1 minute ago, The Lions Den said:

Yes, that's exactly right. If nearly every copy has the same flaw or flaws, CGC won't hammer it as hard as they normally would---as long as the grader is aware of that fact...  

:eek:

That's the tricky part. :D

 

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4 minutes ago, RockMyAmadeus said:

:eek:

That's the tricky part. :D

 

This may not be common knowledge, but sometimes a grader will have to grade books they're not familiar with. I'm more of a Silver Age/Magazine guy, but sometimes I had to grade modern books, which could actually be more difficult in some ways...

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Just now, The Lions Den said:

This may not be common knowledge, but sometimes a grader will have to grade books they're not familiar with. I'm more of a Silver Age/Magazine guy, but sometimes I had to grade modern books, which could actually be more difficult in some ways...

Sure, every era and even many issues from the same era all had their own production flaws. The roller mark that appears as a square indent about 1/8" square near the top and bottom staples of most books from the late Silver to early Modern...? Someone who didn't know what that was would count off for it, but you're be hard pressed (pun absolutely not intended) to find a copy without them, to one degree or another. Same with the "roller crescent" near the top left corner of the back cover of many, many, many Silver age books. Same with the straight line roller marks across the covers of tons of Bronze (mainly Marvel), and the roller tears at the bottom edge of most Direct copies of ASM #361, or the horizontal printer creases found in the bottom right quadrant of every single Direct copy of Cap #241, or the "white spine" along the edge of virtually every single Baxter/offset book from the 80's to now, made when the covers were folded and the edge "split."

All sorts of issues that the unfamiliar might have a problem with.

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On 3/16/2019 at 11:14 AM, RockMyAmadeus said:

And some advice: if you're unsure how a new comic is supposed to "look", go to your local comic store and look at the new books on display...see the wide variety of production quality between publishers, and even within specific issues. The more you expose yourself to large numbers of books, the more familiar you will become with what is common printing variation and "within tolerance" vs. what is post printing damage. And I recommend that for everyone interested in ultra high grade books.

For example, if you saw this book "in the wild":

s-l1600.jpg

You might think the book was badly damaged because of those horrifying tears near the UPC box. But virtually the entire print run of this book was damaged this way (same as The 'Nam #52), because something wasn't calibrated correctly at the printer...so they don't count off "as much" as they would on a regular issue.

after a quick discussion with the seller it was resolved with a 15 dollar deduction to the price so for what I paid I may just skip pressing after all and just enjoy it however it may turn out. 
I keep forgetting to not always try for the 9.8s as desirable as they are and just be happy to have it in my collection (if I got it for the right price). but I will definitely post my results when its sent in to see what CGC sees this as. 

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