Great article about comic art collecting
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207 posts

Thanks for sharing this.  This was terrific.  It gave me a lot to think about.

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1,016 posts

Thanks for posting. Fun read.  

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1,531 posts

Business in front, party in the back.  :headbang:

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76 posts

I think investing in OA is a good idea because I'll never regret the art I am purchasing after several years of learning to purchase what I like and not just any page that comes along.

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901 posts

I got as far as the paragraph which reads:

"Today I have better taste. In fact, I have better taste than most of you. This is not because I’m smarter or worked harder, this is because I had the luxury of reading and buying and selling comics and art without using exclusively my money. If you are reasonably intelligent and have decent self-awareness (most of you), you can develop taste. If you have nearly unlimited access to comic books and great access to original art (almost none of you), you can develop taste better and faster. "

. . . and couldn't stomach any more of the author's elitist attitude.

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24,463 posts

Ehh, he's kind of a knob but all that's really saying is that you need to read a buncha comics to get a sense of what comics matter to the community

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90 posts

I see "elitist" style as more of a slap to the head of the reader/investor. "I am successful so please listen". We can argue success but he does share a lot of hard truths about what will be worth money down the road, and how to have /develop reasonable investor expectations.  No one is an expert printing money, some are lucky, some are patient, some have opportunities or information that the rest of us don't.  I felt it was suitably cautionary that it takes knowledge (which can translate to "taste") to make investments in this "instrument".

I do like his point that if you love what you buy (good advice) you will have trouble selling what you love when the time is right (if money is the reason you bought in the first place)

 

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3 posts

I would be curious how many collectors have gotten into this with an investment mentality.  Many of the collectors of the 80's and 90's got their fill with comic book speculation, so probably shy away from that mentality when collecting art.  Is the art I own ever going to be as much as a Picasso or "investment" art ... not a chance.  However, I am not going to put as much thought into it as this article suggests I should to get my ROI. To quote the remake of The Thomas Crown Affair, "I just like my haystacks Bobby."

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901 posts
10 hours ago, Heidjer Staecker said:

I would be curious how many collectors have gotten into this with an investment mentality.  Many of the collectors of the 80's and 90's got their fill with comic book speculation, so probably shy away from that mentality when collecting art.  Is the art I own ever going to be as much as a Picasso or "investment" art ... not a chance.  However, I am not going to put as much thought into it as this article suggests I should to get my ROI. To quote the remake of The Thomas Crown Affair, "I just like my haystacks Bobby."

I started collecting artwork in 1982, which was pre-investment-mentality days . . . at a time before the internet was invented.  All I can say is that I've done spectacularly well on re-sale over the years, which had more to do with luck than shrewd collecting on my behalf.  The market changed over the years and I can appreciate more nowadays, with prices having gone the way they have, why the investment angle figures more heavily for collectors shelling out big bucks for their art fix in today's world.

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