American Flagg #1 cover at HA.
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Now we have complete provenance - not sure that drives 1980s art prices yet but it is a plus!

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FYI..my 2019 value of the piece is 25K...they did a nice job on  the american flagg hardcovers...

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1 hour ago, Mmehdy said:

FYI..my 2019 value of the piece is 25K...they did a nice job on  the american flagg hardcovers...

If it sells for 25K...I won't feel bad at all for missing out on it. :flipbait:

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18 hours ago, tth2 said:

Groo remained excellent for a long time.

TMNT was fantastic for about 6 issues.

I can't recall exactly, but I remember loving the first 9 or so issues of TMNT, along with at least 3 of the one shots with individual Turtles. Different artists started coming in, then I was out.

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Posted (edited)
52 minutes ago, Nexus said:

What's your 2039 value?

To be fair, this is a worthy thread of its own. What do people feel their collections will be worth in 20 years?

Mine won't fare so well, but that's why I buy what I love and can (basically) afford.

I have three pieces I'm pretty sure will increase in value exponentially. The other 300 or so- eh, not so much. lol 

Edited by Bill C

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1 hour ago, Nexus said:

What's your 2039 value?

depends if this is made into a movie or series and with so many platforms out there ....there is a great chance it will be picked up...if it does and its great....the sky is the limit on AF1 cover

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On 5/9/2019 at 2:41 PM, Bronty said:

I take great umbrage with your choice of the word 'always.'  ;)

Once in a great while, perhaps.   But the rank and file never saw this as anywhere near those other books, at least not in my neck of the woods 2c

I mean... I think this was more on a par with Stray Toasters or something.   An interesting book for some, and for some, a complete also ran.

Have to say when AF hit it was seen as a big step forward for where the NEW independent comics were heading & definitely considered one of the more innovative alternative books of that early phase of indy books, funny for me it's hard to place it into context now because of how dated the book seems. Almost like watching an old MTV new wave video 40 yrs later.

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Gotcha

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3 hours ago, Frank Mozz said:

Have to say when AF hit it was seen as a big step forward for where the NEW independent comics were heading & definitely considered one of the more innovative alternative books of that early phase of indy books, funny for me it's hard to place it into context now because of how dated the book seems. Almost like watching an old MTV new wave video 40 yrs later.

For those of you who spend gobs of money on old classic art pages—consider this an inadvertent warning about their future value. This is probably the way future buyers may feel about those treasures you have, and may not be interested in spending the kind of money you did on that “old MTV new wave video” you found and treasure. 

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4 hours ago, Rick2you2 said:

For those of you who spend gobs of money on old classic art pages—consider this an inadvertent warning about their future value. This is probably the way future buyers may feel about those treasures you have, and may not be interested in spending the kind of money you did on that “old MTV new wave video” you found and treasure. 

Sad, but undoubtedly true. 

 

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40 minutes ago, delekkerste said:
5 hours ago, Rick2you2 said:

For those of you who spend gobs of money on old classic art pages—consider this an inadvertent warning about their future value. This is probably the way future buyers may feel about those treasures you have, and may not be interested in spending the kind of money you did on that “old MTV new wave video” you found and treasure. 

Sad, but undoubtedly true. 

So if we just bide our time, Kirby, Ditko and Romita pages will all be worthless?

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Posted (edited)

 

1 hour ago, tth2 said:

So if we just bide our time, Kirby, Ditko and Romita pages will all be worthless?

Talking artist is in some ways a fallacy; as we all know its a subject matter driven market (and leaning more that way every day as we age out).

You say Kirby and Ditko but what you seem to suggest fundamentally is "fantastic four and spiderman".   

Amerikan Flagg isn't spiderman.   

 

Edited by Bronty

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7 hours ago, Rick2you2 said:

For those of you who spend gobs of money on old classic art pages—consider this an inadvertent warning about their future value. This is probably the way future buyers may feel about those treasures you have, and may not be interested in spending the kind of money you did on that “old MTV new wave video” you found and treasure. 

I think the closest thing to compare the OA market to would obviously be the comic market itself, for year people have predicted the DOOM of golden age comic market and in reality its as strong as ever, ( the original generation that bought those books new is all but gone) yes there will be trends in OA like any hobby, HOT artists, Hot characters etc, but anyone who thinks classic Kirby, Ditko, Smith, Adams, Big John, McFarlane, Miller, Lee & many other artists OA is going to hit the skids based on the changing generational demographics might want to rethink that thought. Staying on topic  AF was a niche indy book at best & while I agree very few characters or OA from that era will stand the test of time in terms of long term investment potential ( yes there are a few exceptions from that indy era)  that market will have very little impact to the overall stability of OA in my opinion its two entirely different types of OA markets being compared.  IMHO OA from The big dog artists & characters of the silver, bronze and to some extent copper & modern age will be in demand long after most of us are dust in the wind & remain good solid investments & if I am wrong OA is still cool as f@ck to own & hang on your wall.

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1 minute ago, Frank Mozz said:

I think the closest thing to compare the OA market to would obviously be the comic market itself, for year people have predicted the DOOM of golden age comic market and in reality its as strong as ever, 

It hasn't been doomed, but its certainly been reduced to the lowest common denominator.    Your well known characters, your classic covers are a fortune.    Everything else is pretty well worthless.     

To your point, that same trend is occurring in OA (and other places).   

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Posted (edited)
6 minutes ago, Frank Mozz said:

I think the closest thing to compare the OA market to would obviously be the comic market itself, for year people have predicted the DOOM of golden age comic market and in reality its as strong as ever, ( the original generation that bought those books new is all but gone) yes there will be trends in OA like any hobby, HOT artists, Hot characters etc, but anyone who thinks classic Kirby, Ditko, Smith, Adams, Big John, McFarlane, Miller, Lee & many other artists OA is going to hit the skids based on the changing generational demographics might want to rethink that thought. Staying on topic  AF was a niche indy book at best & while I agree very few characters or OA from that era will stand the test of time in terms of long term investment potential ( yes there are a few exceptions from that indy era)  that market will have very little impact to the overall stability of OA in my opinion its two entirely different types of OA markets being compared.  IMHO OA from The big dog artists & characters of the silver, bronze and to some extent copper & modern age will be in demand long after most of us are dust in the wind & remain good solid investments & if I am wrong OA is still cool as f@ck to own & hang on your wall.

My take is that no one will give a dam about "big dog artists" with only the fewest exceptions (Frazetta perhaps, etc)... they will care about pages from "big dog characters and big dog stories."   

The art will get reduced to the subject matter.    Moreover, this is ultimately illustration not fine art and so that's precisely as it should be.

 

Edited by Bronty

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38 minutes ago, Bronty said:

My take is that no one will give a dam about "big dog artists" with only the fewest exceptions (Frazetta perhaps, etc)... they will care about pages from "big dog characters and big dog stories."   

The art will get reduced to the subject matter.    Moreover, this is ultimately illustration not fine art and so that's precisely as it should be.

 

I guess we will have to agree to disagree I would note that the same argument has been and to some extent is still is being used with Golden age comics for almost as long as I can remember & yet that era of the hobby along with Silver & Bronze is seeing real growth. I feel it very nieve to think one day ( how long are we talking here?) nobody will care that Jack Kirby did that FF page or that Neil Adams did that splash or Todd Mcfarlane did that cover but will be buying it for the ch content alone ie because the Fantastic Four, Green Arrow & Spiderman are on the page. I Just don't see that ever being that being case be it illustration art or not. 30 yrs from now some kid will pick up DKR read it and fall in love and they will want that  Batman page, cover etc not because its a Batman page but because its a MILLER Batman page, granted a HC AF cover, maybe not so much. There will always be trends but like it or not the great comic illustration artist are here to stay IMHO

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3 hours ago, tth2 said:

So if we just bide our time, Kirby, Ditko and Romita pages will all be worthless?

They will probably do what happens in other markets. The price hits a point, but then, people stop buying it. The price sits there because the Owners figure one day, people will change their minds. But, they don’t. They gather dust like piles of old Beanie Babies that once had huge premium prices on them. Smart owners slowly and quietly then sell what they can for what they can get.

No, they will not be worthless, just not worth the offered price.

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1 hour ago, Bronty said:

 

Talking artist is in some ways a fallacy; as we all know its a subject matter driven market (and leaning more that way every day as we age out).

You say Kirby and Ditko but what you seem to suggest fundamentally is "fantastic four and spiderman".   

Amerikan Flagg isn't spiderman.   

 

What about EC prices? They have not gone up commensurate with some of the Big Two’s stuff, even though they aren’t cheap. Different generation, and I suggest it’s a generational thing. I was originally going to add the Spirit, but that’s an unusual case because so much of it survived with Eisner.

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1 hour ago, Bronty said:

 

Talking artist is in some ways a fallacy; as we all know its a subject matter driven market (and leaning more that way every day as we age out).

You say Kirby and Ditko but what you seem to suggest fundamentally is "fantastic four and spiderman".   

Amerikan Flagg isn't spiderman.   

 

AF to 1980s is Westerns to 1950s. So awesome "then", so forgettable "now" (except for the same original demographic that's now 35 years closer to death).

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