Who owns the most perfect Action Comics #1?
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31 minutes ago, N e r V said:

You all should have forgotten about comic books in 1985 and used that 20k in Apple stocks and enjoy being a billionaire a few times over today. Lol

Or wait until the 1990’s and jump on Microsoft...

Or....

Or if you are a Canadian, you probably should have jumped on board some of those MJ weed stocks back in 2017.  lol

You can hold those for 20 years and see where you end up with them once the bigger companies finish building themselves out and the rest of the global markets open themselves up.  Especially on the CBD side as it goes into the higher margin medicinal products and oils, prescription pills, cosmetic products, let alone your infused beverages (wellness drinks & alcohol) and edibles.  hm

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48 minutes ago, N e r V said:

You all should have forgotten about comic books in 1985 and used that 20k in Apple stocks and enjoy being a billionaire a few times over today. Lol

Or wait until the 1990’s and jump on Microsoft...

Or....

You got some N e r V :hi:

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1 hour ago, woowoo said:

You got some N e r V :hi:

Just trying to de-stress and re-focus you...:devil:

 

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Standing up for comics for a minute... Dave didn't do as well as he would have if he'd bought Apple at the time and somehow had the dedication to hold it for for nearly 40 years, but he did pretty well. Split-adjusted, Apple's IPO share price was .39 cents, so a $25,000 investment at IPO would have bought you around 640000. Held hrough many lean years (and offering less enjoyment than an Action #1 for a comic collector), those shares would be would be worth around $12,000,000 today. That doesn't take into account any dividend that Apple would have paid, but the Church Action #1 still holds up okay assuming he's enjoyed owning the book.

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5 hours ago, rob_react said:

Standing up for comics for a minute... Dave didn't do as well as he would have if he'd bought Apple at the time and somehow had the dedication to hold it for for nearly 40 years, but he did pretty well. Split-adjusted, Apple's IPO share price was .39 cents, so a $25,000 investment at IPO would have bought you around 640000. Held hrough many lean years (and offering less enjoyment than an Action #1 for a comic collector), those shares would be would be worth around $12,000,000 today. That doesn't take into account any dividend that Apple would have paid, but the Church Action #1 still holds up okay assuming he's enjoyed owning the book.

Dave buying the MH Action 1 was the equivalent of buying in an IPO.  He got in before Action 1 popped completely out of the range for ordinary people.  Over the course of almost 40 years he's seen an increase of over 300x in potential value.  

That's not going to happen over the next 40 years with Action 1.  It's no longer at IPO stage, it's a blue chip.  

Which brings us to the old saw:  

Past performance is no guarantee of future performance.  

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6 hours ago, rob_react said:

Standing up for comics for a minute... Dave didn't do as well as he would have if he'd bought Apple at the time and somehow had the dedication to hold it for for nearly 40 years, but he did pretty well. Split-adjusted, Apple's IPO share price was .39 cents, so a $25,000 investment at IPO would have bought you around 640000. Held hrough many lean years (and offering less enjoyment than an Action #1 for a comic collector), those shares would be would be worth around $12,000,000 today. That doesn't take into account any dividend that Apple would have paid, but the Church Action #1 still holds up okay assuming he's enjoyed owning the book.

Like many others here, I've spoken with Dave about the books he owns and he clearly enjoys having them.  Once you have enough money to meet your basic needs, what you do with the excess should be determined by how much you enjoy it and not so much on whether you could make a bit more cash, because what good is more cash except to meet more needs and do more things you enjoy?  

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(thumbsu I was specifically responding to a post earlier in the thread implying that buying Apple at IPO instead of the Church Action #1 would have made you a billionaire- or at least would have made you a lot more money than buying this Action #1 has theoretically "made" for Dave. 

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10 minutes ago, sfcityduck said:

Dave buying the MH Action 1 was the equivalent of buying in an IPO.  He got in before Action 1 popped completely out of the range for ordinary people.  Over the course of almost 40 years he's seen an increase of over 300x in potential value.  

That's not going to happen over the next 40 years with Action 1.  It's no longer at IPO stage, it's a blue chip.  

Which brings us to the old saw:  

Past performance is no guarantee of future performance.  

Many times I would've said that the prices on many things -- from sports and rock and roll memorabilia, to vintage cars and fine art-- can't possibly keep increasing. Only to see people pay not just tens of thousands but hundreds of thousands for a guitar used once in a concert.   And people paying not just millions or tens of millions but over a hundred million for a piece of art. 

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Posted (edited)
7 minutes ago, bluechip said:

Like many others here, I've spoken with Dave about the books he owns and he clearly enjoys having them.  Once you have enough money to meet your basic needs, what you do with the excess should be determined by how much you enjoy it and not so much on whether you could make a bit more cash, because what good is more cash except to meet more needs and do more things you enjoy?  

(thumbsu The value of enjoying owning the book is real value. with this post, I'm just pointing out that there's a big gap between "you could have bought $25,000 of Apple stock and you would be a billionaire" to the fact that buying the Action #1 or Apple stock in the early 1980s actually ends up being in the same ballpark in terms of $$ returns. 

Edited by rob_react

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7 hours ago, rob_react said:

Standing up for comics for a minute... Dave didn't do as well as he would have if he'd bought Apple at the time and somehow had the dedication to hold it for for nearly 40 years, but he did pretty well. Split-adjusted, Apple's IPO share price was .39 cents, so a $25,000 investment at IPO would have bought you around 640000. Held hrough many lean years (and offering less enjoyment than an Action #1 for a comic collector), those shares would be would be worth around $12,000,000 today. That doesn't take into account any dividend that Apple would have paid, but the Church Action #1 still holds up okay assuming he's enjoyed owning the book.

 

1 hour ago, rob_react said:

(thumbsu I was specifically responding to a post earlier in the thread implying that buying Apple at IPO instead of the Church Action #1 would have made you a billionaire- or at least would have made you a lot more money than buying this Action #1 has theoretically "made" for Dave. 

Think I covered this ground before but I was just poking fun at Mr. Woo Wee. Comics can in some cases be great investments. Just not at the top overall if all you care about is the amount of zeroes after the items value. There are better ways to make large sums of cash.

Comics, Art, classic cars or whatever also have the “fun factor” attached to them so you get that with them on top of their value.

I know several people that own copies of Action #1 and I can attest to their joy at owning the current iconic book in the hobby. (thumbsu

So the “dentist” was certainly a smart buyer getting himself great copies of Action #1 and Detective #27 in the 1980’s...

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12 hours ago, lou_fine said:

Or if you are a Canadian, you probably should have jumped on board some of those MJ weed stocks back in 2017.  lol

You can hold those for 20 years and see where you end up with them once the bigger companies finish building themselves out and the rest of the global markets open themselves up.  Especially on the CBD side as it goes into the higher margin medicinal products and oils, prescription pills, cosmetic products, let alone your infused beverages (wellness drinks & alcohol) and edibles.  hm

Or logistics with respect to weed transport, that's big too

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7 hours ago, rob_react said:

Standing up for comics for a minute... Dave didn't do as well as he would have if he'd bought Apple at the time and somehow had the dedication to hold it for for nearly 40 years, but he did pretty well. Split-adjusted, Apple's IPO share price was .39 cents, so a $25,000 investment at IPO would have bought you around 640000. Held hrough many lean years (and offering less enjoyment than an Action #1 for a comic collector), those shares would be would be worth around $12,000,000 today. That doesn't take into account any dividend that Apple would have paid, but the Church Action #1 still holds up okay assuming he's enjoyed owning the book.

Also for some numbers clarity and anyone who wants to check my math. The price of the stock in 1985 was $2.00 a share. So $21,000.00 would have netted you roughly 10,500 shares. So it would be over a hundred million dollars. Pretty sure the Church copy has yet to be anywhere near that figure although Supes is pretty super in value. If you want to use your IPO offering numbers I think it’s around 650 million today. But it’s early for me still and I hate math and money.:nyah:

Apple stock has split four times since 1983. 

  • 2-for-1 on June 16th, 1987.
  • 2-for-1 on June 21st, 2000.
  • 2-for-1 on February 28th, 2005.
  • 7–for-1 on June 9th, 2014.

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Also sticking in comics I wonder how the $$$ work out if you invested that $21000.00 in 1985 into other high grade comics? Maybe PCH to any number of under the radar books. I think the percentage gains will favor many other books over the “big” books in the hobby.

What’s $21,000.00 in 1985 with copies of Hulk #181 looking like today? Lol

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Posted (edited)

https://investor.apple.com/investor-relations/faq/default.aspx

"What was the offering price at Apple’s initial public offering (IPO)?

Apple went public on December 12, 1980 at $22.00 per share. The stock has split four times since the IPO so on a split-adjusted basis the IPO share price was $.39."

(I didn't actually calculate the split -adjusted price)

 

Edited by rob_react

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1 minute ago, rob_react said:

https://investor.apple.com/investor-relations/faq/default.aspx

"What was the offering price at Apple’s initial public offering (IPO)?

Apple went public on December 12, 1980 at $22.00 per share. The stock has split four times since the IPO so on a split-adjusted basis the IPO share price was $.39."

Ah, then I was misreading what you posted. :nyah:

Either way it was only $2.00 by 1985 when he bought the Action #1 so the hundred million investment is accurate that I posted. 

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30 minutes ago, N e r V said:

Ah, then I was misreading what you posted. :nyah:

Either way it was only $2.00 by 1985 when he bought the Action #1 so the hundred million investment is accurate that I posted. 

I think you are improperly looking at both a split adjusted price and multiplying for the stock splits.

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, sfcityduck said:

I think you are improperly looking at both a split adjusted price and multiplying for the stock splits.

 

Don’t know then, check my math. I only counted the current share count today by today’s share price. Start with 10,500 shares and figure it out. I’m just now awake enough to go to work now. Three 2 for one and one seven for one split is a lot of shares at $190.00+ a share today.

Edited by N e r V

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1985 10,500 shares start

1987 21,000 shares

2000 42,000 shares

2005 84,000 shares

2014 588,000 shares

2019 588,000 x 193.00 per share =113,484,000.00

What did I miss?hm

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Posted (edited)
14 minutes ago, N e r V said:

1985 10,500 shares start

What did I miss?hm

That at the $22 offering price, one could purchase just over 1,130 shares for $25,000 (if you were allowed to buy at the IPO price).

Now go and do your multiplying

Edited by Crowzilla

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