Edge tanning on inside covers...
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Hi Folks, quick grading question for you... assuming a conic is in otherwise NM+ 9.6 condition, how much would CGC downgrade it for light, moderate, and heavy inside cover edge tanning, respectively. Thanks in advance!

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Anyone have any thoughts on this?  Won't hold you to it... just trying to get an idea.  Seems to me to be a fairly common defect on older books...

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38 minutes ago, EastEnd1 said:

Anyone have any thoughts on this?  Won't hold you to it... just trying to get an idea.  Seems to me to be a fairly common defect on older books...

Yes, it's definitely common on older books. And it's actually a fairly complicated issue, but I'll do my best to boil it down if I can...

If the edge tanning is very light and it's confined just to the interior cover, I've seen NM books still retain the same grade. 

If the tanning is more moderate, this would usually result in a downgrade of at least 1 full grade (for example, a 9.4 would be downgraded to a 9.2).

If the tanning is heavy and dark (commonly known as "cooked") it would likely result in a fairly significant downgrade, such as a NM book downgraded to VF. I've also seen a nice looking book in VF condition get downgraded to a VG/FN because of severe interior tanning (it was an early Amazing Spidey, as I recall). Usually when books are in this advanced stage of tanning, the tanning will be visible on the exterior cover and the pages as well.

So it depends a lot on the severity of the tanning. Also, tan interior cover edges are more common with certain publishers (such as Dell, for example) and this is usually taken into account by CGC when determining a final grade. Also, some Pedigree collections are actually known for interior cover edge tanning, and it's one of the things that helps to confirm the pedigree...believe it...or not. 

I hope this helps...  :)

 

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This is very helpful... many thanks!  I have some SA books that have this defect and am deciding whether to submit them or not.  Funny that you mention pedigrees... I recall sending in some SA Big Apple books which commonly have this defect in the early CGC days and they hit the books harder than I was expecting... though admittedly at that time, I and many others were still "adjusting" to the CGC grading standards.  It was that experience that's causing me to ask the question now.  Thanks again!   

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43 minutes ago, EastEnd1 said:

This is very helpful... many thanks!  I have some SA books that have this defect and am deciding whether to submit them or not.  Funny that you mention pedigrees... I recall sending in some SA Big Apple books which commonly have this defect in the early CGC days and they hit the books harder than I was expecting... though admittedly at that time, I and many others were still "adjusting" to the CGC grading standards.  It was that experience that's causing me to ask the question now.  Thanks again!   

You're welcome! 

(I do remember those "Big Apple" books, and they were pretty tan...) 

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How does this happen - particularly to just the inside and not the outside?

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6 hours ago, Gaard said:

How does this happen - particularly to just the inside and not the outside?

It's interesting to note this subject has been a rather hot topic as of late...

There are folks here that actually have much more information on this subject than I do, but the simple explanation is that environmental factors like light, heat and humidity cause a chemical reaction in cheap pulp paper, resulting in the creation of acidic gases which eventually lead to paper degradation (yellowing, tanning, foxing, etc.) Not surprisingly, this can occur on both the interior and exterior of the book...which in my mind would also help explain flaws like cover tanning and brittle pages... :foryou:

 

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20 hours ago, EastEnd1 said:

This is very helpful... many thanks!  I have some SA books that have this defect and am deciding whether to submit them or not.  Funny that you mention pedigrees... I recall sending in some SA Big Apple books which commonly have this defect in the early CGC days and they hit the books harder than I was expecting... though admittedly at that time, I and many others were still "adjusting" to the CGC grading standards.  It was that experience that's causing me to ask the question now.  Thanks again!   

A great study on how toning affects the grade on otherwise very high grade books would be to go online, probably starting with the Heritage permanent auction archives, and searching for the Mannarino collection books. They're a fairly comprehensive S.A. Marvel collection of books that appear to range from 9.0 to 9.6 from the standpoint of wear, but rather profound tanning on the outer margins impacts the actual label grades into the 8.0/8.5 ranges. The edge toning here is fairly pronounced, so the overall grade, understandable. Lighter toning will have less of a demoting effect on the book. Some of the Saginaw Pedigree books also have significant toning on the back, front, or both sides.

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