Question about moving comics to mylar
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17 posts in this topic

I've seen a few threads/posts about taking care of your comics (at least the ones that you care about or are worth it), if you're not going to slab them.

They all talk about Mylar and fullbacks. I got some Mylar top loader sleeves, golden age size (figuring they'd be big enough for anything), and some fullbacks. When I tried putting the fullback in to the sleeve, it doesn't go down far enough to close the top flap at its actual crease. So, my questions here are:
1) Did I get the wrong mylar sleeves? I got golden age size ones from BCP, I didn't get the mylites 2. Some of the mylites 2 are on the way now though, but their dimensions don't seem significantly larger than the ones I already have.
2) Do we just not need to close the flaps and that's why it doesn't matter? Just leave them open and display/store as needed?
3) Are the mylites 2 significantly better than any other brand?

 

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So, with mylite2s and fullbacks, they fit without any issues folding them over?

1 hour ago, Thorion said:

I thought Mylite4s were the open top ones that don't fold over? That's the reason I stopped using them decades ago. Mylite2s for me (thumbsu

 

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I committed to mylars back in 2009ish for everything but still have a lot to go back and re-bag.

I posted this in a recent thread, some really great info there...

 

Recommended reading, fantastic thread.

While the images don't display, clicking on the links will show the image. For me, I use the standard Mylar and half backs for everything including moderns with the exception of more expensive silver which get a silver/gold 775 with a full back. Golden age is a completely different ball game though...

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The OP asked about not closing flaps. There was some discussion a couple of months ago with some people saying to leave them open to allow ventilation from outgassed byproducts of oxidation. (We know that happens - you can see it from the yellowing of bags in long-term storage).

 

But what do most here think about leaving the flaps open? Think of the savings on tape if nothing else ;-)

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43 minutes ago, Albert Thurgood said:

The OP asked about not closing flaps. There was some discussion a couple of months ago with some people saying to leave them open to allow ventilation from outgassed byproducts of oxidation. (We know that happens - you can see it from the yellowing of bags in long-term storage).

 

But what do most here think about leaving the flaps open? Think of the savings on tape if nothing else ;-)

I don't like leaving it open. I get really wound up worried that I will screw something up when thumbing through my comics. With it being closed, you have better protection from a toddler running into you with his juicebox.

Anyways, not sure which boards I used but I was able to close my mylytes just fine.

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The mylite 2 silver/gold with the fullback silver/gold combo came in yesterday, both from Gerber. It works great. I had originally ordered gold mylar 4's from BCP and standard fullbacks from Gerber. I think the standard were just too long for the BCP Mylar's. Weird, but, there it is. At least now I know and I have some extras around for an emergency if nothing else.

I've learned quite a few expensive lessons here recently. :) But, better to learn early then when it's really expensive a couple of years down the line. 

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12 hours ago, Albert Thurgood said:

The OP asked about not closing flaps. There was some discussion a couple of months ago with some people saying to leave them open to allow ventilation from outgassed byproducts of oxidation. (We know that happens - you can see it from the yellowing of bags in long-term storage).

 

But what do most here think about leaving the flaps open? Think of the savings on tape if nothing else ;-)

More room for insects to get in.

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On 2/19/2021 at 10:04 AM, xvipah said:

I've seen a few threads/posts about taking care of your comics (at least the ones that you care about or are worth it), if you're not going to slab them.

They all talk about Mylar and fullbacks. I got some Mylar top loader sleeves, golden age size (figuring they'd be big enough for anything), and some fullbacks. When I tried putting the fullback in to the sleeve, it doesn't go down far enough to close the top flap at its actual crease. So, my questions here are:
1) Did I get the wrong mylar sleeves? I got golden age size ones from BCP, I didn't get the mylites 2. Some of the mylites 2 are on the way now though, but their dimensions don't seem significantly larger than the ones I already have.
2) Do we just not need to close the flaps and that's why it doesn't matter? Just leave them open and display/store as needed?
3) Are the mylites 2 significantly better than any other brand?

 

Make sure your storage environment is best for paper storage. Not always easy to do depending on your climate and storage area but that's probably more important than what bags and boards you use.

I once came home from a show with a stack of bronze age comics that were in yellowed, sticky bags. I had to cut open the tops with a scissor because the tape had fused with the bags on a molecular level. The pages of the comics were snow white. That told me they were stored in a cool dry environment, as they should be. 

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2 hours ago, Jeffro. said:

Make sure your storage environment is best for paper storage. Not always easy to do depending on your climate and storage area but that's probably more important than what bags and boards you use.

I once came home from a show with a stack of bronze age comics that were in yellowed, sticky bags. I had to cut open the tops with a scissor because the tape had fused with the bags on a molecular level. The pages of the comics were snow white. That told me they were stored in a cool dry environment, as they should be. 

And stored with less exposure to the air, the bags sealed with tape and stacked together. I'd never store anything in an open top mylar.

Just saw the OP is in FL. To second what Jeffro said, I'd recommend getting a hygrometer and a dehumidifier for your comic room.

Edited by Dick Pontoon
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I'll look in to that for sure. I do live in Florida, so when we're at our most humid the AC is running almost constantly. It does suck a lot of humidity out of the internal air. But I'll definitely get a hygrometer first and see what it looks like in here. Is there a recommended humidity level? Or is it just "as low as possible"?

2 hours ago, Pontoon said:

And stored with less exposure to the air, the bags sealed with tape and stacked together. I'd never store anything in an open top mylar.

Just saw the OP is in FL. To second what Jeffro said, I'd recommend getting a hygrometer and a dehumidifier for your comic room.

 

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On 2/24/2021 at 5:36 PM, xvipah said:

I'll look in to that for sure. I do live in Florida, so when we're at our most humid the AC is running almost constantly. It does suck a lot of humidity out of the internal air. But I'll definitely get a hygrometer first and see what it looks like in here. Is there a recommended humidity level? Or is it just "as low as possible"?

 

 

This is from the American Library Association (you can also search the forums here as well):

 

Store comic books in a clean storage area where temperature and relative humidity (RH) are moderate and stable: 68°F or less, and between 30 and 40% RH. Moisture and temperature speed decay. Low humidity can crack, peel, or curl pages. Avoid attics and basements and provide good air circulation. An air-conditioned room or closet is best.

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