Curious what everyone's plans are?
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I plan to keep collecting and enjoying my collection until I die.  I have about 7000 comics and still buying.

I don't know whether my kids will be interested in inheriting them - maybe my son.

Otherwise, as the time approaches, I'll make sure my heirs are well-informed of any value they may still have, and of liquidation options.

The thrill is very much alive with me. 

Except the prices.  Those don't thrill me.  It's hard to get excited about paying $200 for a book you know could have been had for $50 not many years ago.

I'm actually hoping to hit at least one more buyer's market with some disposable income.

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2 hours ago, PopKulture said:

I've seen a few references to changes on the Bay recently. What are some of the big ones that affect sellers? hm

they have a new "managed payment program" that everyone will have to sign up for , there is a thread about it somewhere here on the boards, i heard everyone

who sells will have to give eBay their SSN and CC info 

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I intend to keep collecting for the next 20 years. Twice now I've sold a great and massive collection of Golden and Silver Age- and I was reluctant both times- and guess what? I just started a new collection eventually and now that's where I'm at. And as I don't anticipate any need to sell, I would like to keep building it for the sheer joy of comic books. I don't have children yet and am certainly not gonna enforce them to be into stuff that I like but it's still possible they might get into comics and have an appreciation for them? So that's basically my plan: keep building and enjoying it each step of the way as long as I can. We'll see what the future brings eventually, right?

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7 minutes ago, 1950's war comics said:

they have a new "managed payment program" that everyone will have to sign up for , there is a thread about it somewhere here on the boards, i heard everyone

who sells will have to give eBay their SSN and CC info 

Well, that is going to throw a monkey wrench into sellers like myself who sell a few items here and there. No way are they getting my SSN so I can sell a few non-comic things here and there. They always have to fix things that aren't broken...  O.o

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Do NOT leave your books to children who have no interest in comics.   They will get ripped off trying to sell them.

 

I intend to gradually sell off my books on eBay and/or here when I retire at 65 to maximize their value.   If I don’t spend all the money, then the kids can have it.

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10 minutes ago, Phicks said:

Do NOT leave your books to children who have no interest in comics.   They will get ripped off trying to sell them.

 

I intend to gradually sell off my books on eBay and/or here when I retire at 65 to maximize their value.   If I don’t spend all the money, then the kids can have it.

One thing that concerns me is "I'm going to sell them all when I retire" is something a lot of people on this board have said, and I think you're all around the same age...

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3 hours ago, Savoyard23 said:

I plan to keep collecting and enjoying my collection until I die.  I have about 7000 comics and still buying.

I don't know whether my kids will be interested in inheriting them - maybe my son.

Otherwise, as the time approaches, I'll make sure my heirs are well-informed of any value they may still have, and of liquidation options.

The thrill is very much alive with me. 

Except the prices.  Those don't thrill me.  It's hard to get excited about paying $200 for a book you know could have been had for $50 not many years ago.

I'm actually hoping to hit at least one more buyer's market with some disposable income.

But that's just it, you don't always know when the time is approaching.  Any of us could be hit by a bus, god forbid, or some other unexpected event, and it will be too late for estate planning or collection dispersal planning.  Just like we should all have wills we should all have some basic plan to sell stuff and some  basic plan to inform our family and friends of value.  Even if it's just a note on boxes of slabs with 'send to comiclink and burn the rest' or whatever.

Edited by thehumantorch
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11 minutes ago, thehumantorch said:

But that's just it, you don't always know when the time is approaching.  Any of us could be hit by a bus, god forbid, or some other unexpected event, and it will be too late for estate planning or collection dispersal planning.  Just like we should all have wills we should all have some basic plan to sell stuff and some  basic plan to inform our family and friends of value.  Even if it's just a note on boxes of slabs with 'send to comiclink and burn the rest' or whatever.

Yeah, you're right.  No argument.  I'm actually working on an app to track the value of my collection, among other things...but I should definitely at least make a list of what's valuable.  Everyone should.

I don't have many real big books.  I have a lot of long runs of mid-grade stuff.  So if I got hit by a bus, honestly, the life insurance and other assets would swamp the value of the collection and my kids would be OK.  Which I guess is how I justify being slow to catalog the collection for them.

It would be better to make it easy for them, though, for sure.

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15 minutes ago, Savoyard23 said:

Yeah, you're right.  No argument.  I'm actually working on an app to track the value of my collection, among other things...but I should definitely at least make a list of what's valuable.  Everyone should.

I don't have many real big books.  I have a lot of long runs of mid-grade stuff.  So if I got hit by a bus, honestly, the life insurance and other assets would swamp the value of the collection and my kids would be OK.  Which I guess is how I justify being slow to catalog the collection for them.

It would be better to make it easy for them, though, for sure.

Ironically here's a new thread about inheriting an uncle's collection

Passing your collection to a family member is a valid plan but it can still become a dilemma for the new owner.   

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21 minutes ago, Savoyard23 said:

Yeah, you're right.  No argument.  I'm actually working on an app to track the value of my collection, among other things...but I should definitely at least make a list of what's valuable.  Everyone should.

Even if it's for home insurance/theft coverage purposes, it's recommended to catalogue everything with estimated values ... so if you need to make an insurance claim, you'll have it all. I've been starting to do this and it kinda kills two birds with one stone. I've actually been meaning to ask CGC if they have all of our historical submissions on their system that maybe we can get our hands on as proof of valuables for insurance purposes. Our submissions drops off after several months, but would be great to get a list of all submissions from the beginning of time ... similar to PSA where they have all of your records from years back.

Edited by MagicMan_2017
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Wow I can't even fathom the idea of someone being uninterested in such a cool item as a big key issue of a major comic character that's a household name. Especially if it's well preserved in a shiny graded slab passed on by a family member. When have super-heroes or comic characters not been intrinsic to society in some degree ever since the early newspaper comic strip days? I don't know that the bottom will ever fall out of this hobby considering older collectibles are still thriving. I mean I have no interest in Elvis memorabilia but if something were to fall on my lap through inheritance I'll learn to like it with the quickness! If you're talking about a bunch of long boxes of unremarkable filler drek that just eats up space that's one thing but otherwise I suspect future generations will appreciate value. 

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1 hour ago, MGsimba77 said:

Wow I can't even fathom the idea of someone being uninterested in such a cool item as a big key issue of a major comic character that's a household name. Especially if it's well preserved in a shiny graded slab passed on by a family member. When have super-heroes or comic characters not been intrinsic to society in some degree ever since the early newspaper comic strip days? I don't know that the bottom will ever fall out of this hobby considering older collectibles are still thriving. I mean I have no interest in Elvis memorabilia but if something were to fall on my lap through inheritance I'll learn to like it with the quickness! If you're talking about a bunch of long boxes of unremarkable filler drek that just eats up space that's one thing but otherwise I suspect future generations will appreciate value. 

Gotta say, if I inherited an expensive Elvis trinket, I'd sell it as fast as possible.  Hope you're right though.

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31 minutes ago, Poekaymon said:

Gotta say, if I inherited an expensive Elvis trinket, I'd sell it as fast as possible.  Hope you're right though.

Eh...I don't know about that. Maybe maybe not. People have been speculating on Elvis stuff outliving its value for some time. It still alive and well. I think the legend will only grow. This country has a big growing professional class that skews young. They're going to have disposable income for a looong time. That's great news for any collectibles market. 

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40 minutes ago, MGsimba77 said:

Eh...I don't know about that. Maybe maybe not. People have been speculating on Elvis stuff outliving its value for some time. It still alive and well. I think the legend will only grow. This country has a big growing professional class that skews young. They're going to have disposable income for a looong time. That's great news for any collectibles market. 

I was reading a few years ago about how things like Elvis impersonators/tribute artists and trips to Graceland were beginning a decline due to a growing lack of cultural connection to Elvis. I was a child of the Eighties and I vividly remember Elvis everywhere- there were commercials for hotlines about Elvis being alive, television movies about Elvis, Bill Bixby hosted tv specials about if he was alive, Weekly World News covers, even corner stands on the road selling those velvet Elvis paintings. I swear, there was so much of it! What I didn't realize about it until much later was just the cultural impact Elvis had and when I was, say, 6 or 7 (I was born in 1979), Elvis had only been dead almost a decade. However, as time has moved on, less and less young people are exposed to him in the same capacity- partly that's because of his estate mishandling his work, partly that's because of a public narrative that Elvis was a thief from African-American culture, partly it's because of the Elvis impersonator's comedic mannerisms infiltrating the subconscious perception of Elvis. So I have to respectfully argue that the value of Elvis collecting *has* gone down and the decline of Elvis conventions and such bear this out. We can equate this to another topic about comics and the lack of new, younger collectors interested in building collections being created. 

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1 hour ago, wisbyron said:

I was reading a few years ago about how things like Elvis impersonators/tribute artists and trips to Graceland were beginning a decline due to a growing lack of cultural connection to Elvis. I was a child of the Eighties and I vividly remember Elvis everywhere- there were commercials for hotlines about Elvis being alive, television movies about Elvis, Bill Bixby hosted tv specials about if he was alive, Weekly World News covers, even corner stands on the road selling those velvet Elvis paintings. I swear, there was so much of it! What I didn't realize about it until much later was just the cultural impact Elvis had and when I was, say, 6 or 7 (I was born in 1979), Elvis had only been dead almost a decade. However, as time has moved on, less and less young people are exposed to him in the same capacity- partly that's because of his estate mishandling his work, partly that's because of a public narrative that Elvis was a thief from African-American culture, partly it's because of the Elvis impersonator's comedic mannerisms infiltrating the subconscious perception of Elvis. So I have to respectfully argue that the value of Elvis collecting *has* gone down and the decline of Elvis conventions and such bear this out. We can equate this to another topic about comics and the lack of new, younger collectors interested in building collections being created. 

then lets have a worldwide contest.

say the name elvis and see how many people say "who?"

 

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3 minutes ago, wilbil said:

then lets have a worldwide contest.

say the name elvis and see how many people say "who?"

 

That's not what I'm saying whatsoever. Everyone knows or has an idea of who Elvis is.

My point- which was simply me learning this organically- is that the cultural relation to Elvis has declined among younger people.

I have an educated opinion. I'm a Rockabilly musician and my relentless touring around the world doing it (it's not a hobby) is what's contributed to paying for my Golden Age collection. I have actual friends who are ETAs' including Doug Church "The Voice of Elvis". I've hung out with Charlie Hodge, met Scotty Moore and Priscilla and played Memphis and Nashville several times. I don't need anyone to challenge me to see if Elvis is still known, even on a surface level. You are correct- most everybody knows OF Elvis. That wasn't the point. 

I could be wrong. I'd like to be wrong, wilbil. I just remember reading a bunch of articles about it and then I talk to various guys I know in the music field. Because of the nature of your contest challenge, I went and quickly looked up such articles and found them- and I admit, an article can be wrong. But here's a quote from one of them:

"The simplest theory for the seeming decline in Elvis interest is the aging of the fan base. According to a 2012 Las Vegas Redevelopment Agency report, more than 40% of Las Vegas tourists are 50 or under—and likely too young to have strong memories (or any memories) of Presley when he was alive."

Now if we can go back to comic book talk I'm happy! Unless I'm the guy you want to challenge about Rock & Roll :takeit:

 

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It’s clear music or sports real life celebrities bank ability fades with the aging/death of their fans. Fictional characters don’t as quickly share their fate (until copyright protections wear out after 120 years or so). Collect comics not Elvis memorabilia. 
 

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